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The Kayak Thread

slowp

slowp

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I know of one person on here who is trying out kayaking. Here's some pictures I just took, since we're going this afternoon. Since the weather differs quite a bit depending on the location in the valley, we usually have a plan A and a plan B.

Here's my longest boat, I have 3, all plastic. I got this one slightly used for half price and added the flame decor so it would go faster. We call it Da Flame. The two hardest things about kayaking are getting it on top of the car, and getting out of the kayak after hours of paddling. The latter is when I am prone to tip over. I have Yakima Racks with Hully Rollers in the rear and Mako Saddles in the front. I've done and had done by a guy trying to be "helpful" a lot of damage to the paint job on the car loading and unloading the boats. I've got a pretty good system using the wheels on the back of the kayak. But they sure slow it down in the water!:)


I'm not a purist. I have a rudder on all the kayaks. The rudder is controlled by pedals that I have my feet resting on. It is always fun to say, "Left Full Rudder." while paddling. Here's the rudder and a shot of the pedals. The pedals are adjustable for different lengths of legs.




Here's a picture showing the deck rigging and cockpit.

It is a comfy kayak. If you paddle with a comfy kayak, you can keep up with people in fast, uncomfy boats. They have to stop frequently to stretch out. :) The bungee is for holding gear on that you want to have handy, like little coolers. It is also for holding the end of the paddle, should you tip over and have to get back in. A piece of safety gear that I carry is a paddle float, which inflates and goes over a paddle blade, you then tuck the other paddle end under the bungee and you have an outrigger, which will sort of stabilize the kayak while you flop your way back in. Tis a hard thing to do, so I try only to tip over when practicing flopping back in.

Finally, my answer to the question "Can you do a roll?" "Yes, halfway."
 
nilzlofgren

nilzlofgren

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The easiest way I found for getting out of a kayak without tipping over, is to lean back, pull both legs out of the opening at the same time. Then you can put your left leg over the left side, right leg over the right side, than just stand up, so You are straddling the kayak. than just step over. Getting in is the same. just straddle the kayak, than just sit down. Than simply lean back and insert your legs. works every time with out a problem. Also, sometimes when I'm paddling I'll lean back and pull my feet out, and let them dangle over the sides. you can even paddle from that position.
 
slowp

slowp

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We went to plan B. Plan A lake was down too far. It is time for draining the lakes a bit to make room for the winter rain/maybe flood. We paddled across a lake, and up the Tilton River till we hit rapids, verbally abusing each other for not taking a camera along.
I have problems getting out, because I get pretty :censored: stiff from sitting.
My friend has problems cuz his knees get stiff. Getting out is the hardest thing to do.
 
yooper

yooper

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My brother in law left his kayak in my barn last year so I took it out on lake superior a few times this Summer. was neet to explore some of the local rivers. I did take it out one day when we had 4 foot waves:dizzy: ......thought I would try to serf with it but only swam.:buttkick: my buddy does it all the time but don't think I will try it again. I will stick to the calm weather with no waves.
 
slowp

slowp

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My brother in law left his kayak in my barn last year so I took it out on lake superior a few times this Summer. was neet to explore some of the local rivers. I did take it out one day when we had 4 foot waves:dizzy: ......thought I would try to serf with it but only swam.:buttkick: my buddy does it all the time but don't think I will try it again. I will stick to the calm weather with no waves.
Yah. I spent a couple years on da udder side of da lake on Chequamegon Bay.
Got a smaller, 14 foot boat and had it out on da bay in similar conditions. It bobbled around like a cork! Had a lot of fun in da big waves. We picked a day with onshore winds so if you went over, you'd have the help of the wind to get back in. Yesterday here was so calm, I enjoyed getting rocked by the powerboat waves.

Everytime I was set to paddle to the sea caves, a storm would come in and we'd have to cancel. We did paddle under an arch up by Cornucopia. If I had stayed there, I'd have tried to but a houseboat for the summer. Being a PNWer, I hated the humid summers and felt at home out on the main lake where the temperature was just right.

I guess I have been assigned the task of organizing an Oregon adventure. I have been told to plan it at the same time as the Rogue Brewery Beer Sale.
Hmm, I better look up and see if they still have beer sales.
 
slowp

slowp

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I have one of The Carolina, which is a slow, bombproof boat. The one I had out in the 4 foot waves. But alas, I haven't taken the camera along much due to fear of getting it wet. I promise, next time, which might come sooner. The weather forecast is pretty cheery looking for this week. Maybe more fall foliage tours.



The Carolina is pretty stable, or has what they call primary stability. It doesn't go over easily, but doesn't have much secondary stability--once you go, you go over. I put the beginners in it when we take along people for the first time. It too, is a cheap plastic boat. I drilled holes in it to hold a rod holder. Then I plugged the holes with p-tex after I decided not to fish in it.
One friend ran it up on rocks at full speed. :cry: I've dropped it a few more times,:cry: :cry: and it keeps holding up. It is 14 feet long. I bought it new.

OK, gonna see if I have pictures on here of the kayaking group under the bridge.
 
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slowp

slowp

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Here's the picture under the bridge that is over the Cowlitz River. We paddle up the lake, under the bridge, and then up the river. There's a long paddle through a gorge. The current gets stronger and stronger, then if things are right, you go around a bend and there's a dam looming ahead. Dams look huge when looked at from kayak level. The Carolina is on the left, the really fast NC fiberglass one is in the center, and the purple one that my friend wants to sell me is on the right. After this trip, the couple in the purple and the Carolina boats went out and bought some really nice, but really spendy boats. They got hooked.
 
Gologit

Gologit

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Hey, Kayak Guru

Neat pictures. Is primary or secondary stability more important? And why? And which would be the preferred one for a rank beginner? I understand about metacentric height from when I fished but primary and secondary stability are new to me.

Remember, talk slow....cause I listen slow. :)
 
slowp

slowp

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Neat pictures. Is primary or secondary stability more important? And why? And which would be the preferred one for a rank beginner? I understand about metacentric height from when I fished but primary and secondary stability are new to me.

Remember, talk slow....cause I listen slow. :)
Metacentric? Never heard that. What is it in simple terms? Primary is good for getting up confidence (I am no expert on this) but I think if you want to go out in the big waves, secondary is important for bracing (plopping your paddle down to keep from doing a half roll) and most of the spendy kayaks are more of a secondary type. My cheapos are rounder, the other type has a sharper cut--hull shape. I'm sure you can read up on this. A roundish flattish hull is good for putzing around in.

I think the Pygmy Kayak site explains all this well...chines and such.
http://www.pygmyboats.com/

The scary book to read is called something like Sea Kayak, Deep Trouble.
 
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Gologit

Gologit

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Metacentric? Never heard that. What is it in simple terms? Primary is good for getting up confidence (I am no expert on this) but I think if you want to go out in the big waves, secondary is important for bracing (plopping your paddle down to keep from doing a half roll) and most of the spendy kayaks are more of a secondary type. My cheapos are rounder, the other type has a sharper cut--hull shape. I'm sure you can read up on this. A roundish flattish hull is good for putzing around in.

I think the Pygmy Kayak site explains all this well...chines and such.
http://www.pygmyboats.com/

The scary book to read is called something like Sea Kayak, Deep Trouble.
Metacentric height is part of the stability formula for boats and ships. It helps determine how far you can roll without going clear over...at least that's my understanding of it. It helps when you're figuring stability with different fuel, ballast, and deckload configurations. That's about all I know about it except for my uncle's warning that replays in my ear..."If you stack those pots any higher on deck the SOB is going to roll over like a gut-shot dog". He must have been right...he died in bed.

I plan on just "putzing around"...gently and quietly. Mostly lakes and harbors....and the neighbor's bass pond to practise in. I've had all the high seas adventures I ever want to have.

I looked at the Pygmy website...neat stuff and very informative. I was too busy reading kit instructions and drooling over the finished boats to read up on chines and such but I'll get back to it this week-end.

Got more pictures? :popcorn: :cheers:
 
slowp

slowp

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I can take some of the accessories, like the paddle float and how it is used
(a dryland simulation). I was going to do that yesterday after work but got ambushed by a logger in the parking lot about how I Really Need You To Mark Some Trees For A Landing Cuz We're Going To Need It Right Away, and then trying to explain something to one of our people who could not understand, so forgot and left my camera at work. I haven't taken the digital camera out on voyages much so don't really have many pictures.

My friend's Jack Russell sometimes rides on the front of his yellow fast boat. It slows him down a bit. Then the dog falls or jumps in the water, gets pulled out, gets cold, and gets stuffed in the cockpit to warm up. I think he should have a couple more terriers to take with him and then maybe I could keep up easier.:) Wow, 3 of those little beasts stuffed in a cockpit, probably fighting, that would be exciting and informative to watch!
 
slowp

slowp

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Accessorizing is fun. Here are paddle float pictures.

Here's the paddle float as it looks prior to blowing it up. I roll it up and tuck it under the bungees/lines on the deck.


Then you inflate it partially and stick it on the end of the paddle, then blow it up till it is full. Mind you, in a real situation you're doing this in the water.


You tuck the other end of the paddle under the deck bungees and hope you can get back in the boat ok. For me, it is a hard thing to do, but doable.
The cockpit will be full of water too, which makes the boat even tippier when you are back in it. Bailing time. Here's the paddle end. This boat has an indentation just for this purpose.
 
Gologit

Gologit

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Accessorizing is fun. Here are paddle float pictures.

Here's the paddle float as it looks prior to blowing it up. I roll it up and tuck it under the bungees/lines on the deck.


Then you inflate it partially and stick it on the end of the paddle, then blow it up till it is full. Mind you, in a real situation you're doing this in the water.


You tuck the other end of the paddle under the deck bungees and hope you can get back in the boat ok. For me, it is a hard thing to do, but doable.
The cockpit will be full of water too, which makes the boat even tippier when you are back in it. Bailing time. Here's the paddle end. This boat has an indentation just for this purpose.
Good pictures and a great explanation. Thanks. Now it makes sense.
 
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