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Tree ID Please

Omaha419

Omaha419

ArboristSite Lurker
Joined
Sep 10, 2015
Messages
38
Age
39
Location
West Virginia


Initially thought it was Box Alder, but the heartwood is much different. Not too bad to split. Kind of stringy. If there’s a knot, forget about it. Eastern Panhandle of WV. Thanks.


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Omaha419

Omaha419

ArboristSite Lurker
Joined
Sep 10, 2015
Messages
38
Age
39
Location
West Virginia
Looks like Elm to me. Not sure if would be American due to the blight. Maybe Grey Elm. Have you tried to split it yet?
Straight pieces with no knots are moderate. I’ve been splitting so much Ash lately that I’ve gotten spoiled.
If there’s a knot, I have to noodle it.


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panolo

panolo

Seldom right...Always opinionated!
Joined
Oct 14, 2016
Messages
935
Age
43
Location
Central MN
Elm for sure. PIA to splits but burns nice. If you don't have a hydraulic let it dry before you bounce the maul off it.

Just saw the leaf and it sure looks like American elm at that.
 
Omaha419

Omaha419

ArboristSite Lurker
Joined
Sep 10, 2015
Messages
38
Age
39
Location
West Virginia
Thanks everyone for the replies. Sadly this was a beautiful tree, but it’s right where we are building a garage.


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stumpy75

stumpy75

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Joined
Mar 5, 2011
Messages
822
Location
Toledo, OH
Elm, probably American, as I think I can see a ring of white just beneath the bark on the end grain pic. The leaf is right too. Some American Elms do survive for quite a while before usually succumbing to the disease.
 
stumpy75

stumpy75

ArboristSite Guru
Joined
Mar 5, 2011
Messages
822
Location
Toledo, OH
I haven't seen a live American Elm since I was a kid.
They are rare around my area, but they do exist. There seems to be more in the New England states than around me. The SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry has been trying to develop a disease resistant variety for a lot of years, and have had some good success lately. They have sought out the remaining trees to try to find out what makes them resistant.

https://www.esf.edu/pubprog/elm/default.htm

As a student there a long tome ago, I remember a presentation on what the research was at that time. They tried all the normal ways of trying to keep a tree from dying, but the final slide(remember those??) showed the prof standing on a freshly cut stump...
 
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