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Tree paint other then tree paint?

Discussion in 'Forestry and Logging Forum' started by bitzer, Apr 8, 2019.

  1. bitzer

    bitzer Bullshit Timber Expert

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    In a pinch could a guy get away with a good enamel? I've got ten acres to mark this week and I know I'll be a can or two short. My best priced paint will take a week to get here. I know the ground marking(inverted style) doesn't last long on trees. Maybe a year at best it seems. Any thoughts? Experience? Bs just for fun?
     
  2. northmanlogging

    northmanlogging The gyppo's gyppo

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    Most land owners out here just use regular cheap spray paint, lasts a ffar while, you just need to be up close and personal with the tree to make it work.

    Where as tree marking paint you can be 6 or so feet back and make it work
     
  3. bitzer

    bitzer Bullshit Timber Expert

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    Yeah you were right about having to paint close up. Like right on the tree. Only had to use one can of enamel. Should be fine I'd think
     
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  4. Markus

    Markus ArboristSite Operative

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    Which trees do you paint? The ones to be cut or saved? Or perhaps the boundary lines of the site?
    I'm curious because we don't usually mark individual trees over here, unless they are for something special like poles.
     
  5. ChoppyChoppy

    ChoppyChoppy Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Use survey tape here.

    On the last timber sale, they marked the boundary in one color and seed trees (ones to keep) in another. Everything else was to be cut.
     
  6. bitzer

    bitzer Bullshit Timber Expert

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    Typically the trees to be cut are marked. Rarely are just the save trees marked, but that does happen. Usually in an oak shelterwood cut. Sometimes the paint is just drying on a sale when I get there and sometimes it's been years. Flagging tape doesn't last very long. Either the weather or the neighbors get to it. Boundaries get painted too.
     
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  7. Markus

    Markus ArboristSite Operative

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    Thanks. Property boundary lines are often painted here but no much else.
    We use flagging tape, some use plastic but the company I work for uses tape made of paper, it can even be boiled with the pulp without harming the process, unlike plastic.
    Seed trees are left to the harvester operator to choose, but usually we do clear cuts and replant the following year.
    We flag boundaries, marches/creeks and sometimes the path we wish the forwarder to use to get most of the wood out to the landing, that's mostly to guide them around wet areas where they can get stuck or damage water ways or to show a way through rough terrain etc.
    So our flagging is to show where to cut but it's up to the logger or operator to choose which trees to cut and which to save.
     
  8. Skeans

    Skeans Addicted to ArboristSite

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    We hardly use paint here most of the jobs it’s not allowed it’s all flagging with marking ribbon, certain colors and color combos mean different things. Blue water line or buffer zone from creek, Pink harvest area, Pink/Blue combo end of harvest zone, these are about all I’ve seen thinning. If I’m flagging trails for cutting in the early morning I’ll use green, white, or a red with white strip depending what the trail is as well as try to leave the ribbon for the forwarder operator on the main trails.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  9. catbuster

    catbuster Catskinner. And buster.

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    We tape trees, stake grades and boundaries and paint proposed excavation & existing hazards/stuff in the way.
     
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  10. madhatte

    madhatte It's The Water Staff Member

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    We paint either cut or leave trees, whichever there are fewer of. Leave treed are painted orange or red (DANGER! DON'T CUT!) where cut trees are blue (it's cool y'all). Often we use paper tap for temporary marking because it's gone in a couple of years no matter what. Flagging for boundaries is temporary or between timbered areas; our boundaries are marked using weather resistant hi-viz orange cards called flashers. Road repairs are marked with both paint and flagging and landings are flagged. VMA's (vegetation management areas) are likewise only flagged.
     
  11. Westboastfaller

    Westboastfaller Addicted to ArboristSite

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    "Tie a Yellow ribbon.. 'round the old Oak tree"
     
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  12. northmanlogging

    northmanlogging The gyppo's gyppo

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    It's a fact (cue bubbly red head with braces)

    Tie a yellow ribbon, was originally about getting out of prison, riding the bus home... if there was a yellow ribbon just keep on riding
     
  13. bfrazier

    bfrazier ArboristSite Operative

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    I'm sure one blue paint is just as good as another for most private lands, but the paints the USFS uses for timber marking have multiple chemical trace elements that react to reagent testing in various ways (like turning another color). This is done to prevent people from just over spraying that "leave tree marking" with the take tree color and stealing the timber.
     

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