ArboristSite.com Sponsors
 
 


trimmer with circular blade

Discussion in 'Hand Held Equipment and Tools' started by abs111999, Oct 17, 2019.

  1. abs111999

    abs111999 ArboristSite Operative

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2009
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    13
    Location:
    west
    Whats a good model of trimmer for 90% hard use with carbide circular blade for cutting sagebrush and similar crappy
    use?? Probably a commercial model...will get hard use.
     
  2. ATH

    ATH Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2006
    Messages:
    3,741
    Likes Received:
    2,489
    Location:
    Ohio
  3. abs111999

    abs111999 ArboristSite Operative

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2009
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    13
    Location:
    west
    cant find that on sale
    what about something less than 400 with a circular blade...
    I see the Renegade Blade...good reviews...it fits on the Stihl 130/131 and many others...
    its a fully round blade.... I dont want that triangle type..
     
  4. ATH

    ATH Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2006
    Messages:
    3,741
    Likes Received:
    2,489
    Location:
    Ohio
    You'll get what you pay for... yes, there are $400 saws that you can put a circular blade on, but it won't cut more than an inch consistently.

    It is more at entreprenadbutiken than when I posted early in the year, but still a lot less than anywhere in the States that I found it (didn't find it for less than $1299...)
     
  5. alderman

    alderman Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2005
    Messages:
    3,739
    Likes Received:
    1,852
    Location:
    Western Oregon
    I’ve had good luck with the Shindaiwa C350 and C45 brushcutters. They handle a blade well. I purchased used for less than $200.
    Often homeowners with pro equipment don’t put many hours on them and they are in very good shape, much cheaper than new.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  6. tilenick

    tilenick ArboristSite Guru

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2011
    Messages:
    514
    Likes Received:
    206
    Location:
    Columbus, Ohio
    I have used a still fs 90 or 95 for years with a circular blade, cuts down 1 inch saplings with a couple of chops, and the blade is re-sharpenable I think I got it from the dealer as well.
     
  7. ironman_gq

    ironman_gq Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2008
    Messages:
    1,560
    Likes Received:
    504
    Location:
    Iron Range MN
    Stihl 131 will handle it pretty well, I've got a shindy c344 that works great as well. Mine with a carbide blade takes just about anything up to 4" without too much fuss
     
  8. John Lyngdal

    John Lyngdal ArboristSite Operative

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2017
    Messages:
    432
    Likes Received:
    668
    Location:
    Eugene, OR
    I have a carbide blade on my FS250 and it does a fine job on small brush.
    Don't think I'd use on on a smaller trimmer, but whatever you purchase bicycle bars are a must.
     
    ATH likes this.
  9. ATH

    ATH Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2006
    Messages:
    3,741
    Likes Received:
    2,489
    Location:
    Ohio
    Back to the 555FX - the harness that thing comes with is pretty sweet. Very easy to use the tool all day.

    Oh...and it doesn't slow down for 1" stuff - right through like there was nothing there.

    Just depends on what you need to cut and how often you are going to use it. I justified buying mine because I had a contract to get rid of 5 acres of invasive shrubs. Saved LOTS of time there.
     
  10. Mad Professor

    Mad Professor Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2007
    Messages:
    8,247
    Likes Received:
    4,444
    Location:
    North East USA
    How well do the stihl and echo multi tools handle brush blades?

    I need to control invasives: multiflora rose, barberry, buckthorn. Not much thick stuff, I'll use a chainsaw with crappy chain for that.

    I'm looking at multi tools as would also like/need a pole saw attachment, and use the brush cutter head with a string trimmer
     
  11. ironman_gq

    ironman_gq Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2008
    Messages:
    1,560
    Likes Received:
    504
    Location:
    Iron Range MN
    http://www.airecut.com/products

    The tri wing blade is what you want for that kind of stuff, it'll handle anything under 1/2" and won't clog up if you get into grassy stuff.
     
  12. Mad Professor

    Mad Professor Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2007
    Messages:
    8,247
    Likes Received:
    4,444
    Location:
    North East USA
    Do they have USA distributors?
     
  13. alderman

    alderman Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2005
    Messages:
    3,739
    Likes Received:
    1,852
    Location:
    Western Oregon
    I’ve purchased them off eBay. Over the years I’ve used quite a few different blades and the Aire cut is my favorite. Very seldom gets tangled as long as you keep the rpms up. One word of advice, as designed they blow stuff into the air so wear a face shield. I wear safety glasses as well. Stings to catch a hard chunk in the face.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
    sliderulacuracy and ATH like this.
  14. ironman_gq

    ironman_gq Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2008
    Messages:
    1,560
    Likes Received:
    504
    Location:
    Iron Range MN
  15. Hsvhobbit

    Hsvhobbit New Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2019
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Alabama
    I’ve got a stihl fs110r and have settled on forester blades for my brushwork. The 9” carbide chipped quickly if I hit rocks or wire (fenceline clearing) but otherwise stayed sharp better than the steel toothed versions. Downside other than chipping was it required a diamond file to sharpen. I’ve gone back to the plain steel version. They have chainsaw style teeth so little learning curve to keep them sharp. With the 9” blades I can zip thru a 1” sapling like nothing and up to 3” goes pretty quickly. In fairness if I’d realized I’d do this much bladework I’d have gone for a fs250’class trimmer.
     
  16. Hsvhobbit

    Hsvhobbit New Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2019
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Alabama
    Never mind my comments on my fs110 I’ve just killed the second gearbox this afternoon.

    I’m going to be researching a much heavier duty model for my own brushwork. Research will start at the fs240 and go up from there. Sadly list on the monster 560 is something like $1600ish.
     
  17. Ax-man

    Ax-man Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2003
    Messages:
    2,297
    Likes Received:
    559
    Location:
    NE Illinois
    If that 560 is the new version of the 550 clearing saw that I have it is overkill unless you really need a pro heavy duty clearing saw . I have a 450 also and like it much better than the 550 but still it is also pricey and kind of over kill for average brush cutting . Not trying to be arrogant but the only reason I have these top of line Stihl clearing saws is because we had pasture clearing job to get rid of Osage Orange trees a long time ago. After cutting and chipping the bigger trees we would go back over the area with those clearing saws with the big tri cut blades to knock down tall grass and the small stuff we didn't get with a chain saw to get the area down to ground level . Those clearing saws made short work of that task but we could have gotten by with smaller machines.

    You mentioned the 240 that would be a good choice or the 250 . They are popular. I don't have one but do have it's older version that I think is an FS 200K which is kind of close as far as an engine and it has plenty of power for doing light brush work . I have worked on a few of those FS 250 's at my part time job and after I fixed them to get them running right I was impressed with that 250. Not to heavy ,easy to maneuver and the engines sound like they have more than enough power to get the job done and the price isn't too bad for a mid range clearing saw/brush cutter . I would like to have one but just don't need it. One of those 250's I worked on had a 9 inch carbide blade on it and you could tell it has seen some abuse from cutting with a dull blade . The main drive was still good just a neglected carb was all it needed to get it back running and it sounded sweet to my ear.

    I am glad you mentioned a diamond file to try and sharpen those carbide tipped blades . I have some diamond files but forgot about them . Those blades aren't that outrageous to buy but it might be worth a try to see if the teeth can be touched up . I never tried it only because the consensus is that once they are dull you throw them out and put on a new one. I tried the steel ones a long time ago and was very disappointed but these carbide blades are the ticket for cutting small brush.

    Might add this . Get one of those harnesses verses a shoulder strap if your going to run a brush cutter for extended periods of time . It is easier on the back because of the side to side motion swinging one of those brush cutters. If it wasn't for a harness I couldn't run a brush cutter for very long these days because of the strain it puts on my back.
     
  18. Hsvhobbit

    Hsvhobbit New Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2019
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Alabama
    I hear you on the harness. I got one for my pole trimmer (131) and it’s been a godsend even for my trimmer. I use the brush blades pretty heavily working on clearing some badly neglected fenceline and I guess the strain from the 9” blades was just too much for the gear head. That’s my main reason for needing to upgrade.
    All too often when clearing saplings I’ll use the trimmer when I probably should break out the chainsaw but i sure like not having to fuss with thorn vines. Easier on my knees as well.

    As to sharpening the forester blades it seems silly to throw away one just because it’s dull. They really do sharpen up easily even the carbide ones. My main gripe about carbide is the teeth just chip too easily on rocks/wire and working around overgrown fenceline it’s just too easy to hit that junk.
     
  19. ATH

    ATH Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2006
    Messages:
    3,741
    Likes Received:
    2,489
    Location:
    Ohio

Share This Page