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Walk us through a run

troutfisher

troutfisher

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troutfisher

troutfisher

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Chopwood

Chopwood

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Mark three cuts on the log.

Warm up

Set throttle lock, put motor at TDC, switch on

Set the saw two inches out fom the end of the log, with the powerhead about one inch back from the end of the log.

Set the starter handle in the notch I have in the top cover.

Left foot even with the starter handle, right foot depends on how high the log is.

hands on the wood.

Start, hands as quick to the saw as you can. Pull hard as I can for about a foot of cord (my saws start really easy). Be quick to the rear handle.

Shove the saw in the wood.

Push hard, pull up hard, push harder on the third cookie.

Shut the saw off.

Walk back to the truck.
 
troutfisher

troutfisher

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"Left foot even with the starter handle, right foot depends on how high the log is."

There's a lot going on in that bit of advice there. It has taken me a long time to stop moving my feet, I still step once in a while. I guess it just comes from hours of practice... learning where to stand in relation to the block and the saw, how far to bend down (I've tried bending my knees and crounching more, I've also tried keeping my legs straighter and bending my back more), and lifting the saw just high enough to clear the block.
 
timberwolf

timberwolf

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From some WW canoing instruction I do I think a good approach is to break everything into steps.

Do each as a separate excercise

Dropping hands from log to saw
Starting saw
Hitting the first mark
Making first down cut
making first changeover
Making upcut
making second changeover
last down cut.

Focus on each segment by it's self ignoring all others, then work to start combining steps together.

So often students new to canoeing come down a rapid and say "how was that", it's really hard to anylize as a whole but if broken down to focus on one or two things at a time it's much easier to identify areas to work on and ways to improve.

Having the dedication to practice I find to be the hardest part, just way to many otherthings in life all demmanding time.
 
troutfisher

troutfisher

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When I first started thinking about racing, I went to a show and videod the Hotsaws. Once I had that video I could sit at home and time the runs, dead starts, individual cuts, changeovers. Then if you get a pic of the results sheet, you''l know what time won and what time took last place. That gives a person a real good scale to measure their progress by, know what to work on, and know when they're ready to give it a shot.
 
HS Climber

HS Climber

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Yes technique wise.

but what about if they had a bad start but there saw is faster then the other guys.

or if their saw that day is not running as hot. but he won every other race besides that day.

you kinda have to look at a few shows to compare.
 
Chopwood

Chopwood

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Yes technique wise.

but what about if they had a bad start but there saw is faster then the other guys.

or if their saw that day is not running as hot. but he won every other race besides that day.

you kinda have to look at a few shows to compare.
If you have a bad start, you aren't winning (or probably placing) in the east. Regardless of how fast your saw is.

No one wins all the races.

You can watch the shows and see who has the gear and the skill. Around here, the Gingras brothers, J-Sim and J-Seb Bertrand, Pfenniger and a couple others win most of the contests. They have good saws and don't make mistakes.
 
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