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Peak Industries


Water mist cooling to help prolong life of rings and pistion life when milling ideas.

andy at clover

andy at clover

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If what you're talking about OP is actually akin to "climate control" for the saw.....maybe it would have some positive effect.

It does seems like an awful lot of hassle for a machine that is designed to manage some fairly heavy heat swings.
They don't add those cylinder fins and flywheel fans for nothing!
I've run on 80*-90* days and although not ideal..... I suffered much more than the saw...:(
 
Assembler

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If you are going to build it, post lots of photos. I agree that a mist aimed at the head only would bring the temperature of the motor down as the water evaporation would pull more energy out of the motor.

If you purpose build a mill and weight isn't an issue, you could just use a water cooled dirt bike engine... think hotsaw, but for milling.
Yes a water cooled bike engine would be very nice however I'm not there yet. I still can pack and use the chainsaw in the woods. The dirt bike would not be as portable however would hold up better once fabricated up.

I will be pleased if the temperature can be reduced with out doing to much fabricating..........lol.
 
Assembler

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If what you're talking about OP is actually akin to "climate control" for the saw.....maybe it would have some positive effect.

It does seems like an awful lot of hassle for a machine that is designed to manage some fairly heavy heat swings.
They don't add those cylinder fins and flywheel fans for nothing!
I've run on 80*-90* days and although not ideal..... I suffered much more than the saw...:(
Yes I agree that the less fabrication the better as I think I will still use as a bucking saw with a 42" bar form time to time.
The real goal is to reduce the operating temp. for the long cuts during the day no matter what the air temp. is. Any reduction in temp. will be good to reduce the heavy heat swings that may damage parts.

I’m going to wait awhile to see how this coronavirus continues to evolve before doing much more work on the saw.

I hope to make the fabrication parts just bolt on and off. I still have the factory gas tank and all the parts on it if I don't like how it turns out.
I’m going to wait awhile to see how this coronavirus continues to evolve before doing much more work on the saw.
 

Duce

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How about using a portable room air conditioner. Use a tube running from a/c cool outlet, connected to saws top cover (not filter cover), no need for exhaust a/c tube. That should reduce cylinder temp. :popcorn2:
 

BobL

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I have a temp gauge on my exhaust port of my 880.
hotidle.jpg
It's instructive and interesting to watch the gauge while milling and how long it takes to cool down afterwards - it takes a lot longer than you think.
What it also shows is, the harder the wood and blunter the chain the hotter it runs
I don't think there would be many people on this site milling in as hard a timber and as hot a weather as I do.
Keep the chain sharp, richen the mix/air ratio and open up the exhaust port is all you should need.
 
andy at clover

andy at clover

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I have a temp gauge on my exhaust port of my 880.
View attachment 808217
It's instructive and interesting to watch the gauge while milling and how long it takes to cool down afterwards - it takes a lot longer than you think.
What it also shows is, the harder the wood and blunter the chain the hotter it runs
I don't think there would be many people on this site milling in as hard a timber and as hot a weather as I do.
Keep the chain sharp, richen the mix/air ratio and open up the exhaust port is all you should need.
I ove your industrious use of Bike components Bob! Good Stuff!
 
Assembler

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I have a temp gauge on my exhaust port of my 880.
View attachment 808217
It's instructive and interesting to watch the gauge while milling and how long it takes to cool down afterwards - it takes a lot longer than you think.
What it also shows is, the harder the wood and blunter the chain the hotter it runs
I don't think there would be many people on this site milling in as hard a timber and as hot a weather as I do.
Keep the chain sharp, richen the mix/air ratio and open up the exhaust port is all you should need.
It is true that you may run your saw in hotter conditions. Looks like this shows that reducing the cylinder temp. by 100 - 225 degrees could help no matter the what the warmer conditions are.

Don't know yet if a small water spray would reduce the temp much as it appears not many are willing to do it yet. My self included. The idea is for a reduction in temp. for the whole cut.
 
rarefish383

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No disrespect, but I think you are creating a problem that doesn’t exist. I mill with a 45 year old Homelite Super 1050. Just let it idle between cuts. Might be 8 years ago that I bought a new Stihl 660 to give the old Homelite a break. But, I still take the Homelite with me in case I hit steel or something in a log. All of my saws have seen commercial service, so they are not Harry Homeowner specials. Even being retired I still go through 5 gallons of mix a month, lots more in the summer.
 
rarefish383

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No disrespect, but I think you are creating a problem that doesn’t exist. I mill with a 45 year old Homelite Super 1050. Just let it idle between cuts. Might be 8 years ago that I bought a new Stihl 660 to give the old Homelite a break. But, I still take the Homelite with me in case I hit steel or something in a log. All of my saws have seen commercial service, so they are not Harry Homeowner specials. Even being retired I still go through 5 gallons of mix a month, lots more in the summer.
 
grizz55chev

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Sorry for the double post. Not yelling at you.
Huh? Lol, I’m half deaf from running my saws, as well as having selective hearing. You could delete the double post, but I like the way you did it anyway. The subject of water on an air cooled engines is an example trying To outthink the engine designers. Keep it simple , run it how it was built to run, problem solved.
 
Assembler

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No disrespect, but I think you are creating a problem that doesn’t exist. I mill with a 45 year old Homelite Super 1050. Just let it idle between cuts. Might be 8 years ago that I bought a new Stihl 660 to give the old Homelite a break. But, I still take the Homelite with me in case I hit steel or something in a log. All of my saws have seen commercial service, so they are not Harry Homeowner specials. Even being retired I still go through 5 gallons of mix a month, lots more in the summer.
There is no disrespect taken as most (about 96 %) will have this out look as being to much trouble to deal with. Point taken.
Peak and duration temperatures is the point I'm trying to address.
 
Assembler

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There is no disrespect taken as most (about 96 %) will have this out look as being to much trouble to deal with. Point taken.
Peak and duration temperatures is the point I'm trying to address.
Yea the McCulloch 125 saw I have is at least 50 years old. I don't think the water jet spray is needed the first few min. of running the saw. I have a barque temperature gauge I could use for contact temp. measureing and a electric windshield water pump to apply water spray to increase the factory cooling. The point is to keep the peck temp. down say a 100 - 200 degrees to reduce the break down of oil and parts over a longer cut. I will have to use metal lines and parts where it gets warm is the key. This saw will be mostly used for milling.
 
Maintenance supervisor

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Water steam is hot and it could end up heating up the saw, water alcohol mix might be better .
Turbo guys would build a wire basket in front of an intercooler and put dry ice in it ,as the car goes down the track ambient air is cooled by the dry ice and reduces the intercooler charge, i dont see why putting a basket with dry ice in it on the starter cover wouldn't have the same effect ? Guys with roots blowers would pack it around the manifold between runs. The local grocery store sells it here.
 
Assembler

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Water steam is hot and it could end up heating up the saw, water alcohol mix might be better .
Turbo guys would build a wire basket in front of an intercooler and put dry ice in it ,as the car goes down the track ambient air is cooled by the dry ice and reduces the intercooler charge, i dont see why putting a basket with dry ice in it on the starter cover wouldn't have the same effect ? Guys with roots blowers would pack it around the manifold between runs. The local grocery store sells it here.
The idea here is to pull off more BTU's from the outside of the cooling fins. Water will pull off a lot more BTU's then just air going by the cooling fins of the air cooled cylinder of the saw. My plan at this time is to take a 2 liter water tank and feed the water to a windshield washer pump to spray onto the cooling fins of the saw. This should lower the temp around a 100 degrees or so. No one's doing it so my saw will be the first test. I will have three 2 liter tanks one for gas, one for oil and one for water cooling mounted on top of the large mill set up.
The dry ice would also work for extra cooling. I'm not going to do it unless I go hot saw.
 
Assembler

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The idea here is to pull off more BTU's from the outside of the cooling fins. Water will pull off a lot more BTU's then just air going by the cooling fins of the air cooled cylinder of the saw. My plan at this time is to take a 2 liter water tank and feed the water to a windshield washer pump to spray onto the cooling fins of the saw. This should lower the temp around a 100 degrees or so. No one's doing it so my saw will be the first test. I will have three 2 liter tanks one for gas, one for oil and one for water cooling mounted on top of the large mill set up.
The dry ice would also work for extra cooling. I'm not going to do it unless I go hot saw.
If someone offers money in a hot saw contest it would be very fun to take some dry ice to really pull out the heat out from a hot saw for say a 8 - 10 minute run. I would also try to get the chain speed way up if possible and not blow things up. Someone would have to do the machining for me as I spent some $$ all ready for the saw and large 5 ft. mill setup.

This is not high on my list to do however would be kinda fun to do.
 
Assembler

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The idea is to reduce the operating temperature of the cylinder fin cooling area by 100 – 400 degrees to prevent or reduce over heating during a long milling cut. This is even more important when the air temperature is about 85 degrees or more. As a plus continue to run the water mist cooling during the 2 - 3 minute cool down period after a long cut is made.
It would be hard to reduce the temperature by 400 degrees unless there is a water jacket around the cylinder area or as some one pointed out maybe dry ice?
 
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