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Were number 1 in fatalities

Huskybill

Huskybill

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on yahoo the logging industry is number one in fatalities. Not a time to be number one but it’s true. I’m sure that OSHA will be all over this report. It mentions about needing medical assistance when your deep in the woods.

Working for a elevator engineering company they took the deaths on the job seriously to a whole new level. Today they have a very low number in fatalities.

I like the saying from the national timber fellers association “ is what I’m about to do safe”
Ask yourself,,,,,on every task. We never know what that tree will take path wise. Don’t let our ego get in the way. Clear a exit path around the trunk before felling. I’m no pro nor consider myself one but I did everything I could to be safe when felling.

The most dangerous jobs are, (once rated)
1. Coal mining,
2. Logging
3. Elevator mechanic

Be safe, don’t work alone, inspect your gear, climbing equipment. Godbless
 
Capitalist

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Logging has been number one for many years by a wide margin.

Different statistics lump different things together and it changes them.

For instance tree removal is lumped in with landscaping workers.

Last I knew logging was 120 fatalities per 100,000.

As an example it is I believe twenty times more dangerous than being a police officer, firefighter, or emt.

The statistics are too lumped together imo.

I would like to see it broken down by specific job title of every group.
 

sb47

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It would seem to me the farther you are from medical help, the higher the chances are your survival rate will drop for serious injuries. The medical industry calls this the golden hour. Working many miles from medical help slows down response time for paramedics to even arrive.
 
Huskybill

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I carry a first aid kit in every car. A bigger kit in the truck. My leather belt has holes all around it to the buckle. I purchased larger Guase patches from the pharmaceutical store.

I wanted that foam that melts into the wound to stop the bleeding but they wouldn’t sell it to me. I should of taken a paramedics course. My dad was a medic in the army.
 
KiwiBro

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I carry a first aid kit in every car. A bigger kit in the truck. My leather belt has holes all around it to the buckle. I purchased larger Guase patches from the pharmaceutical store.

I wanted that foam that melts into the wound to stop the bleeding but they wouldn’t sell it to me. I should of taken a paramedics course. My dad was a medic in the army.
tampons and pads
 

sb47

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I carry a first aid kit in every car. A bigger kit in the truck. My leather belt has holes all around it to the buckle. I purchased larger Guase patches from the pharmaceutical store.

I wanted that foam that melts into the wound to stop the bleeding but they wouldn’t sell it to me. I should of taken a paramedics course. My dad was a medic in the army.

They say a tampon is good for puncture wounds that bleed heavily. Stuff it in the hole and it will swell and stop the bleeding. I bet a Kotex pad would make a good gauze as well.
 
David Gruber

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I just read an article from US News that had fishing industry as most dangerous as far as number of injuries per 100k workers with logging/forestry 2nd. That was injuries and fatalities combined still not the top 10 list I like to be on
 
Skeans

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It would seem to me the farther you are from medical help, the higher the chances are your survival rate will drop for serious injuries. The medical industry calls this the golden hour. Working many miles from medical help slows down response time for paramedics to even arrive.
At least in Oregon part of working in the woods is being able to call life flight directly out to a job site, is it perfect no but sure increases our chances of survival.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

sb47

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At least in Oregon part of working in the woods is being able to call life flight directly out to a job site, is it perfect no but sure increases our chances of survival.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
If your out very far, life flight is the fastest way out to very remote places for sure. It's great you can call them out directly. Finding a suitable landing area may present some challenges though. And they are far more equipped to deal with serious injuries and probably have better trained paramedics as well. I would rather ride in a helicopter then bounce around in a ambulance for hours down bumpy dirt roads.
 
rarefish383

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When I went to Philmont Scout Ranch with my son, they had a rule, no Scouts or leaders over 250 pounds. I asked why 250, what if the guy is 6'6" and a star athlete. They said it had nothing to do with the individuals condition. 250 was the limit they put on how much 2 people can carry on a litter. So, if you are looging in the boondocks, there are lots of factors on getting medical attention.
 
rarefish383

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I put this here out of respect to the EMS Captain that lost his life reported in another thread. If he died removing a tree in his yard, that is not a logging accident. That could help skew the numbers if statisticians lump all chainsaw/tree accidents into logging accidents. It just may be the way the media classifies it.
 
Huskybill

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My dealer had a land clearing business. His partner cut a limb that crushed his partner between the limb and trunk. Not good.

We have some big state forests here. I’ve been deep in some of them. Vermont has Huge national forests. There’s no shortage of timber there. My cj7 Jeep has been all over my area.
When the trails ended we walked.

At my age 69 yo I can’t picture myself side stepping trees as I’m felling them anymore. I really enjoyed doing firewood. I’m my own boss, hard work, I’m in nature’s beauty all day long.
 
rarefish383

rarefish383

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I don't get why guys climb some of these trees? Given, we don't see the surrounding area on the ground in that clip...
Like you said, we don't see the surroundings. I grew up in, and retired from a Residential Tree Service. We very seldon threw a whole tree across a yard, even if there was room. We would rope the top out, and block the tree down in firewood size pieces. The majority of our work was in the high rent areas of Washington DC. You just didn't tear up those lawns. Some guys at AS say we were crazy to spend the time to do that. It's obvious they don't make the money we did. Wealthy people pay crazy money to have things done their way. We've had customers comment on neighbors yards that had trees dropped across them and were patched up, top soil, seed,straw. Several years later the imprint was still in the yard, and the contractor grade seed was a different color. If we had too we would dig up a bush to drop the blocks in and replant it when we were done. Personally, if someone took the time to take the tree down in small pieces and not damage anything, we called them a pro. If they told the customer the only way to do it was throw it across the yard, and patch up the damage, we called them a fly by night hack.

In the above video I call the climber lazy. He tied his pull line just as high as he could reach. To get the limb to break over he had to cut his notch off, pulling the butt out and smacking himself all about the head and shoulders. If he had of taken 5 minutes and used a 12' pole saw o put his pull line in the top of the limb, his ground man could have pulled it free and he wouldn't have got slapped.
 
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