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Were number 1 in fatalities

Ted Jenkins

Ted Jenkins

Firewood by TJ
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i would bet there are other areas that are dangerous too, but logging and tree work are very bad. You get paid extra for doing jobs with out preparation so cutting corners has its reward until it rips your arm off or kills you. About a year ago a young guy from my town was doing some work out of town and was limbing on a down slope until the log crushed him. Apparently he was in too big of a hurry to stay safe. I have heard that story before. Thanks
 
Marine5068

Marine5068

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on yahoo the logging industry is number one in fatalities. Not a time to be number one but it’s true. I’m sure that OSHA will be all over this report. It mentions about needing medical assistance when your deep in the woods.

Working for a elevator engineering company they took the deaths on the job seriously to a whole new level. Today they have a very low number in fatalities.

I like the saying from the national timber fellers association “ is what I’m about to do safe”
Ask yourself,,,,,on every task. We never know what that tree will take path wise. Don’t let our ego get in the way. Clear a exit path around the trunk before felling. I’m no pro nor consider myself one but I did everything I could to be safe when felling.

The most dangerous jobs are, (once rated)
1. Coal mining,
2. Logging
3. Elevator mechanic

Be safe, don’t work alone, inspect your gear, climbing equipment. Godbless
one of the most dangerous occupations is actually in the Navy working aboard an aircraft carrier.
Or so it was reported.
 
rarefish383

rarefish383

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Some where, maybe in insurance info, I read that most accidents aren't accidents, they are caused by human failure, and it usually takes 3 points of failure to cause the accident. When I was at UPS, I was on the safety committee. We had one class that started with an actual film of one of our delivery drivers. He was sitting at a red light, the light turned green and he pulled off, and a young kid hit him in a sports car at over 100 MPH, killing both kids in the car. The whole accident was on a red light camera. The police did not charge the UPS driver. The question to the class was whose fault was the accident. I was the only person in the class that said our driver. Not because I'm that smart. I just know, that UPS always blames our drivers. When I was asked to explain, I used the 3 points of failure. In the video, the driver was looking at his computer board when the light turned green, looked up and took off. That was two points of failure, he wasn't paying attention, and he didn't look Left, Right, Left before taking off. A third point of failure was the kid going 100MPH

In the above video, I knew before I clicked on it what was going to happen. You had a top that was entangled in another top. A tag line that was set too low to have any leverage on the top. Points of failure? Tag line should have been high enough that the ground man could have pulled the top free, while the hinge was still attached, using the hinge to guide it. Tying the tag line too low. The climber had to cut his hinge completely through before it came free, then the ground man just pulled the butt out a few feet.

No one likes to be told they caused an accident. But, when you sit down and analyze one, you might find things that would have prevented it. It doesn't always take 3 points of failure, but, when you go back and start looking, you usually can find three things.

Most people say, that's just stupid, nobody is going to do all of that stuff. They are right, it's hard work to pay attention every minute you are awake. But, if more people did, there might be a lot less accidents.
 

JTM

ArboristSite Guru
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Dec 7, 2011
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North Alabama
Arborists are not in the same industry classification as logging. So if you read about fatal occupational injury rates you need to know how they are derived. The Bureau of Labor Statistics uses the NAICS code to report fatal injury rates by industry. Arborists fall under Landscaping Services. Logging has its own code. So you can see there might be some disparity when comparing the two, from the BLS data anyway.
 
Dave P 71801

Dave P 71801

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South Arkansas
This is something I don’t talk about much but I think by far I had the most deadly job there is from July of 2001 till April of 2007 I served as an EOD tech (Explosive Ordinance Disposal) in the USMC during that time I was deployed on 5 combat tours (3 in Afghanistan & 2 in Iraq) my battalion had a 75% casualty rate and I lost a lot of friends and 95% of my hearing.
 
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