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What are you building with your milled wood? merged

Discussion in 'Milling & Saw Mills' started by stonykill, Apr 12, 2007.

  1. BigOakAdot

    BigOakAdot ArboristSite newb

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    IMG_0798.JPG IMG_0799.JPG IMG_0800.JPG IMG_0803.JPG IMG_0804.JPG IMG_0797.JPG Got a couple Xmas coffee tables out this year. Well one was a gift another one I sold to a friend. No special woodworking here just a ton of router sledding and lots and lots of sanding.

    My friend is a manager at sherwin Williams and they carry festool now. I got to use the ro 90 sander. It's a relatively small head but boy does that thing crank. It was tough to control on rotary mode while sanding end grain with 40 grit paper. Definitely got those router marks off faster than my dewalt palm sander.

    I know they're so expensive but I'm tempted to drop the money and get the ro 150. 6" head and that way I can buff off my finishes instead of wiping it off with towels. Get a more professional look and save boat loads of time on sanding. I basically only make slab furniture and can't imagine ever needing a high end festool other than their sander.

    Anyone here use festool stuff at all?

    The table with the embedded river rocks was for the customer. Wasn't too excited about it but now that it's done I do enjoy the look. Thought it may take away from the natural beauty of that beast cherry slab but I'm happy with it. Plus that's what they wanted and were paying for so I can't complain.

    The other one is just filled with epoxy. Pics were taken on my old crappy iPhone and not much natural light hence why it doesn't pop like the other table. His house has some serious natural light and really looks nice. I expect these to really darken up. Hope you guys like it!

    Andrew
     
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  2. Bmac

    Bmac ArboristSite Lurker

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    Andrew

    Very nice look to those tables. Must be a ton of work to flatten and smooth all that end grain. Also a ton of epoxy. Which epoxy do you use?

    I use the Festool ROTEX 125 sander, love it. Very aggressive. Was thinking of getting the smaller head RO 90 for tighter spaces but can't justify the expense. I also use the festool RAS 115.04 instead of an angle grinder for shaping. That is very aggressive. Dust collection with festool sanders is also off the charts, this feature alone is worth the increased cost.

    I have a few other festool tools, but the sanders are the best ones I own, and I think the best sanders on the market. The festool I want right now is the domino, expensive but from all I've read it's a game changer for furniture.

    Finally, I assume those end tables are made from oak? Red or White?
     
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  3. BigOakAdot

    BigOakAdot ArboristSite newb

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    If you're referring to the above two coffee tables they are both cherry believe it or not. It was when I first got my grandberg mill, and I found a guy locally who saw the potential in such a large cherry tree that was in decline.

    It was codominant so I decided to just free hand the 5' or so that was one solid trunk and got 3 beautiful cookies out of it. Had some ant rot where each leader grew from hence the rock areas and epoxy in the other table you see above.

    It took me so long to sand the marks from the router sled. I forgot what a pain in the ass it is to sand end grain.

    As for epoxy I used "us composites" table top epoxy 1:1 ratio. It actually went bad halfway through pouring those voids (it was relatively old and the resin became gritty). I was in a panic because it needed to be done for a party last Saturday and I was crunched for time. Amazon came to the rescue and had "pro marine supplies" epoxy that arrived in less than 24 hours even during Christmas time. It was slightly more expensive but I was in a pinch.

    I would recommend both but as I'm sure a lot of you know by now, always do multiple small pours to eliminate bubbles and heat. I'll be picking up more us composites because like I said it's some of the cheaper stuff I've found on the web. Hope that helps.

    Ps that cherry rocking chair is to die for. I strive to have even some of the woodworking skills that you do bmac.
     
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  4. KiwiBro

    KiwiBro Hold my beer and film this...

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    Heck no. CAD is bad enough without getting started on Festool woodworking gear. I avoid that stuff like the plague.
     
  5. KiwiBro

    KiwiBro Hold my beer and film this...

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    Also can pour during falling temps so the wood itself isn't burping, and carry a heat gun or gas/camping burner/torch to pop bubbles as they surface. And let the mixture sit a wee while to help bubbles out of the brew before applying.
     
  6. Sawyer Rob

    Sawyer Rob Addicted to ArboristSite

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    When you mix epoxy, you are suppose to "fold it", NOT whip air into it...

    SR
     
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  7. AaronB

    AaronB ArboristSite Operative

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    I made this end table out of white oak and walnut that I milled at my Father-in-laws house, gave the table to the in-laws as a present. Basically he got part of his tree back as a table.d

    EndTable076.jpg EndTable082.jpg
     
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  8. TOlsen

    TOlsen ArboristSite Lurker

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    Nice end table. I love the rays in that quarter sawn oak. Are they just as visible from other angles? When I get them in a pice they seem to come and go depending on light and viewing angle.
     
  9. Cease232

    Cease232 ArboristSite Guru

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    Nice Greene and Greene!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
     
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  10. twoclones

    twoclones ArboristSite Guru

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    I'm doing a lot of restoration work on my 1962 Willys pickup truck (original Tornado engine and drive train). When converting to a flatbed I decided to use rough, full dimension sycamore for the bed to give it the look of a sawmill owned truck. Not quite finished with the headache rack area but the flatbed is functional.

    There are 24 d-rings recessed into the floor of the bed for securing my chainsaw carvings and milled slabs.
    [​IMG]

    Before the sides and tail gate were installed, I was delivering cedar slabs to the hardwood retailer.
    [​IMG]

    Sides and tailgate fold down and are pulled together tightly with 'draw latches'. No rattling here.
    [​IMG]

    I'm working on a matching cargo platform for the front of this trailer made from a 1949 Willys pickup truck.
    [​IMG]
     
  11. BigOakAdot

    BigOakAdot ArboristSite newb

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    Nice work fellas! I like the rays on that end table as well. That truck is looking bad ass!

    And yes good tips above for the epoxy. I use a propane torch and it takes care of all the bubbles. Usually do a very light coat first to seal the wood to prevent bubbles and the lack dye from leaking into the grain.
     
  12. Bmac

    Bmac ArboristSite Lurker

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    Here is a new project, these stools are a creation of Charles Brock, he calls them Bowtie Stools. The look is pretty cool and I love the curves in the legs. This one is made out of black walnut I milled, on the floor behind this one you can see a stool I made out of cherry I milled

    bowtie stool 2.JPG bowtie stool 8.JPG

    Here are some close ups of the joints.
    bowtie stool 3.JPG bowtie stool 6.JPG bowtie stool 9.JPG
     
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  13. Brian72

    Brian72 ArboristSite Guru

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    Wow! Those are awesome!

    Sent from my E6782 using Tapatalk
     
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  14. Rosss

    Rosss ArboristSite Operative

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    Wow those are beautiful!!

    How did you dry the cookies? I think they turned out really well.
     
  15. Brian72

    Brian72 ArboristSite Guru

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    Gorgeous! Love the walnut accent pieces.

    Sent from my E6782 using Tapatalk
     
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  16. Brian72

    Brian72 ArboristSite Guru

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    Kitchen table built for my son. Walnut and red oak.[​IMG][​IMG]

    Sent from my E6782 using Tapatalk
     
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  17. flatbroke

    flatbroke ArboristSite Operative

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    You folks are pretty talented. I can only dream. Also it seems almost every downed tree I come across, (only oak) has termites in it to some degree. How do you deal with that.
     
  18. Brian72

    Brian72 ArboristSite Guru

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    Just grab some wood and some tools and go to town. A little research can get you plenty of knowledge. I never built a table before. I got the itch and built 2. Took me a while but I got it figured out. As far as bugs, maybe get some advice from a local exterminator.

    Sent from my Moto E (4) using Tapatalk
     
  19. BigOakAdot

    BigOakAdot ArboristSite newb

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    Air dried them for 3 + years. I don't own a moisture meter, well one that works right, but if I had to guess they still had some moisture in them. I made my personal coffee table from one of those cookies over a year ago and it held up fine so I figured they were good to go.

    Glad you liked them.
     
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  20. Czech_Made

    Czech_Made ArboristSite Operative

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    Love it, kudos for keeping the old iron on the road, sir.
     

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