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Where are the tonnage specs coming from ?

milkie62

milkie62

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How are some of these companies coming up with the tonnage that they are claiming for their splitters ? It would seem that some of these high 30 ton to low 40 ton models would need in the range of a 6" cylinder. There is no way a TSC splitter is putting out the power that their bigger ones are touting.
 
kevin j

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It’s simple: marketing BS,

most people compare if there’s a number they think they’re comparing two models. And if that number is bigger than a competitor we can sell our machine.
The most common way is they take the highest rated component maybe 3500 psi or 3700 psi and multiply that times cylinder area and get an inflated tons. Even though the system is operating say at 2400 psi.

very few actually operate in 3000 to 3500 psi range because the cost and availability of components changes considerably at the 3000 psi point. Not to say that lower quality components can’t be pushed a higher pressure, it’s just that for industrial components 3000 is a traditional boundary where hose and pump technology changes somewhat.

Basically just compare cylinder diameter between different models and ignore all the tonnage ratings. And look at pump size and cycle time and probably most important is ergonomics and overall quality.

I asked a floor salesman one time how they were claiming X number of tons with the 4 inch cylinder and the pressure. he had apparently gone to product sales class. And memorized everything but understood nothing, because his explanation was ‘our cylinder is so much more efficient than the other companies’
 
Chippy Chopper

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It’s simple: marketing BS,

most people compare if there’s a number they think they’re comparing two models. And if that number is bigger than a competitor we can sell our machine.
The most common way is they take the highest rated component maybe 3500 psi or 3700 psi and multiply that times cylinder area and get an inflated tons. Even though the system is operating say at 2400 psi.

very few actually operate in 3000 to 3500 psi range because the cost and availability of components changes considerably at the 3000 psi point. Not to say that lower quality components can’t be pushed a higher pressure, it’s just that for industrial components 3000 is a traditional boundary where hose and pump technology changes somewhat.

Basically just compare cylinder diameter between different models and ignore all the tonnage ratings. And look at pump size and cycle time and probably most important is ergonomics and overall quality.

I asked a floor salesman one time how they were claiming X number of tons with the 4 inch cylinder and the pressure. he had apparently gone to product sales class. And memorized everything but understood nothing, because his explanation was ‘our cylinder is so much more efficient than the other companies’

Ditto.

How the Foxtrot do you think a 9 hp Honda can generate 25+ tons of force and get something done...??? Ain't happening.

Multiply the surface area of the cylinder plunger (R x R x 3.14156) times the actual working pressure, divided by 2,000 (for tonnage). It will be more like 10-15 tons. :dizzy:

Darn salesmen..............
 
Marine5068

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When I bought my house with old woodstove(since upgraded), I started cutting my own firewood and bought a small, electric 4 ton splitter. It is an awesome machine and has split over 50 cords of wood.
surprising what it could do. I use it to do small amounts or kindling or indoor splitting now.
I've since bought a Forest King farm model hydro splitter rated at 30 tons.
I know it can't be pushing 30 tons of force at the blade so its definitely false advertising.
It does good though and was on sale so I'm happy with it.
0603823_1.jpg maxresdefault.jpg
 
kevin j

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Well a porta power can generate 25 tons just at a much slower speed. It’s purely pressure times area as your formula above Then force times speed is the horsepower required.

SO Many times I get asked if I put a bigger engine on my existing splitter will it cycle faster? No. More speed requires a larger flow, which then takes more horsepower to turn that larger pump at the same maximum pressure.
 
milkie62

milkie62

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I wonder if you had a guage on say a TSC splitter and then show the math. Would they have to allow you to return it because of false advertising ? I would think the cheaper valves are non-adjustable and could be factory set.
 
CentaurG2

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I have run a processor rated at over 50 tons powered by a 100hp John Deere turbo diesel. It had enough force to flatten a 6” square X 16” piece of red oak firewood like an airgun pellet. You could push the wood thru the box wedge sideways if you wanted to. Don’t know how they actually measure the ton force.
 
sundance

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I wonder if you had a guage on say a TSC splitter and then show the math. Would they have to allow you to return it because of false advertising ? I would think the cheaper valves are non-adjustable and could be factory set.
And buy what to replace it? They all play the same BS game. As far as i can tell none of the consumer splitters actually have workable tonnage numbers. Buy what will work for you, accept the claimed specs are BS and move on.
 
Dcsco

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I have a TSC $999 25ish Log splitter. It has split everything I could fit under the wedge. 25” oak stump, at least from the swell up. It split them all. If I could get it loaded, it split it. The cycle time was claimed to be 11 seconds.

You may get a faster cycle with a larger unit. The log splitter can work hard. My complaint is that a full tank of gas outlasts 6 plus hours

The point is that my bottom of the line machine will split anything I load. Tonnage smonage


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Huskybill

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It’s pi time (x) the bore, times (x) the hydraulic pressure.

The surplus center has the hydraulic pumps and cylinders you match the pump to your engines hp.

My last homebuilt splitter was a 5” bore x pi 3.1416= 15.07 x 3,000 psi= 47.124 tons. What she didn’t split she cut through it.

I built a 32ton splitter with a 3,000psi with a 3.5” bore cylinder for 25 years homemade. My only problems was the free I beam was too thin but a sledge hammer would fix it when it bent but not often.

I have extra I beams here is anyone in ct or nearby is interested affordable.
 
uniballer

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It’s pi time (x) the bore, times (x) the hydraulic pressure.
...
5” bore x pi 3.1416= 15.07 x 3,000 psi= 47.124 tons
No, it's pi x r squared x pressure / 2000, where r is half the diameter of the bore. Franny K came up with the right figure above.

(pi x 2.5 x 2.5 x 3000) / 2000 = (6.25 x pi x 3000) / 2000 = 58904 lbs / 2000 = 29.5 tons
 
ChoppyChoppy

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I have run a processor rated at over 50 tons powered by a 100hp John Deere turbo diesel. It had enough force to flatten a 6” square X 16” piece of red oak firewood like an airgun pellet. You could push the wood thru the box wedge sideways if you wanted to. Don’t know how they actually measure the ton force.
Cord King?
Seems like it used a 6" or 7" cylinder if memory serves me.

7" cylinder at 3000psi makes about 55 tons of force.
 
ChoppyChoppy

ChoppyChoppy

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It’s pi time (x) the bore, times (x) the hydraulic pressure.

The surplus center has the hydraulic pumps and cylinders

I have extra I beams here is anyone in ct or nearby is interested affordable.

Me too. H beams, some large ones, 16-18" 1/2 and 3/4" flanges.

I'd about give to a good home at this point. Have a bunch, probably 40-50 of them in lengths from around 6ft to 16ft.
 
soloz2

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I have a TSC Countryline 25T I picked up on sale for $900. It has split everything I've put in it, 23" ash rounds included.
 
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