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White pine cabin logs

Discussion in 'Milling & Saw Mills' started by Ryan Willock, May 29, 2006.

  1. Newfie

    Newfie Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I avoid cold water.....:laugh: but seriously folks....


    In terms of how you construct other bits of the cabin that are not of log construction or interior log walls. Everything is allowed to slide in slots milled into the exterior walls. That way, when one portion of the structure shrinks faster than another there is some room for "slippage" and things stay level in relation to each other rather than binding or bending.
     
  2. aggiewoodbutchr

    aggiewoodbutchr Addicted to ArboristSite

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    In our cabin we slotted the holes on everything that was bolted to the exterior walls. We also left the window and door rough openings 3/4" taller than usual.
     
  3. scooter90

    scooter90 New Member

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    I'm currently constructing a white pine timber cabin (using 5x10s) in western New York. The lumber was milled in February and I cut the dovetail ends in June. I'm using Larch for my first course and setting it on masonry piers minimum of 8" off the ground. I intent to place a visqueen moisture barrier between the ground and the footprint of the building as well as 24" overhangs and a site graded away from the structure. IMG_4299.JPG . I think the cabin will get adequate sun so that excess moisture won't be a problem. Hopefully the cabin is still standing long after I'm gone
     
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  4. rarefish383

    rarefish383 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Hey, Scooter. You managed to pull up a very old thread, most of those guys are gone. No problem, your cabin looks good. Welcome aboard. If you want to start a new thread you may get more activity on it. I plan on building one on my hunting property in WV. I have several White Pine that are close to 40" DBH, and lots of White Oak in the 24" range. I'm leaning toward the Pine, just can't bring myself to take down the Oaks.. I built a 16X20 shed 30+ years ago and used pressure treated 4X4's to keep it off the ground. All the rest was standard framing 2X4's. Every one said the shed would rot and cave in in a few years. It's still standing with my wood shop in it. ZERO rot anywhere. Plenty of overhang keeps everything dry, that's all it takes. If my cabin last that long, I'll be dead and gone when the kids bull doze it.
     
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  5. SeMoTony

    SeMoTony Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I'm in the midst of reading a book on timber framing. White pine is highly recommended for ease of forming the joints, and the minimum amount of shrink, twist or any of the other side effects of drying. The book says the only wood more stable is red cedar.
    Seems like good to go
     

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