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Women and Dogs

TheDarkLordChinChin

TheDarkLordChinChin

My name Borat, I like you
Joined
Mar 20, 2019
Messages
808
Location
Ireland
A match made in hell or are modern women just (generally speaking) incapable of handling dogs?

My neighbour who is in her early 80s and still very physically active owns a labradoodle. It's a big white labrador poodle mix. She has had it 4 years now and still cant control it. I walk it for her twice a day if i have time. It responds much better to me but is still a bit untrustworthy. It's hips are not right, which is a result of it's breeding, it can be very fight or flight and is very willful. Often times I tell it to sit or whatever and it pauses, looks around and then grudgingly does as it's told. If I call it back to me when It is nearly home it often just belts it back to the house. The owner cannot control it at all, it just doesnt listen to her. Granted it's a hard dog to control but it is at least a little functional with proper reinforcement. She is not firm enough with it when it does something bad and is not consistent enough with punishment and reward.

My other neighbour is a single woman living with a labrador and a jack rustle. The labrador is actually her son's dog that he left her with when he went to college. This woman is divorced and a part time teacher. She has the dog in a dog run of about 8 meters by 3 meters with a kennel in it. She is totally incapable of looking after the dog and borderline neglects it. She tried to employ me to look after/train it but knowing what a mental case she is I have kept my distance. She has the damn thing on a leash 24/7 while it's in the dog run because there are horses grazing the field right next to the dog run. She is not the type of person who could manage to work out an electric fence. To be honest I dont know why she is living in the country. She doesnt let the dog out at all anymore and rarely walks it. The jack rustle deosnt get out at all except at night. I met her walking her dog on the road the other day. That was an experience. At 50 meters she started shouting at me to put my dog (1 of three I had with me) on a lead. This dog of mine is 8 years old and has never been any trouble to anyone, he does not need to be on a leash. I shouted back saying it's fine and not to worry but she turned around and started walking the other way. What a moron I thought. After a few minutes she shouted at me again saying she would go down the lane on the left so I could pass. This woman cannot control a young labrador on a fcuking lead. The dog is the right age to be trained but nope she's not capable or willing. She should not have a dog.

My sister bought a lurcher last year. She bought it as a pet. Similar situation, although she looks after it much better. After nearly 2 years the dog does not respond to her unless it has no other option. It will not sit, stay, come to its name or anything else unless tempted by food or cornered. With me its a much different situation. I have looked after the dog a few times when my sister went away and within a day I was able to get it fairly well behaved. My sister will not lay a hand on the dog except to pet it. No matter how many times I tell her that dogs do not understand speech and violence the same way we do I get the same response: "hitting animals is cruel and does not work". There is a big difference between kicking the sh1t out of a dog and firmly slapping it on the nose while telling it off with a raised voice. The former is brutal and unnecessary (usually) where as the latter is what the dog would receive from its superiors in a pack scenario. But no, I'm always the abusive brute and she's the unquestionable saint...who has only ever had one dog. This is the dog: 1585187403462.png


That picture was taken over Christmas when I was looking after it for here. I had been walking it when it took off across the fields. A minute or two later it came racing back to my call. Had it been my sister in the same situation the dog would never have been seen again.
 

uniballer

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Aug 24, 2019
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58
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WNY
In my experience, most people don't want to invest much time or effort into learning about dogs.

They pick the "cutest". Most seem to stop training as soon as the dog knows it should not crap in the house. Some try to impose bad "training" methods that conflict with the dog's natural behaviors and then wonder why their dog "misbehaves".

The ones that really crack me up are the people who buy a husky (a dog whose ancestors were bred to pull at a run) and then want to know how to teach him not to pull them around.

Genes are not destiny, but they tend to have big effects on behavioral traits. To me, looks are nice, but secondary to behavior.
 

Husky Man

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Sep 28, 2017
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Mt Hood, Oregon
Many women just don't understand how to train or command a dog.

The absolute worst breed that I have seen for manners and behavior are Pugs, Simply Terrible little Beasts, My Wife had 2 when we Married, her Sister had 2 a Good Friend of mine had one, and I have been around countless others, I have yet to see a Pug that is well mannered, never mind obeys any commands.

If anything ever happened to my Wife, and I was meeting women again, a Pug (though they seem to be acquired in pairs most often) would be an Instant Deal Breaker, I simply will not subject myself to that breed again, and I have had dogs, except for short periods, all my Life.

Doug :cheers:
 

ktmtigger

ArboristSite Operative
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Apr 22, 2018
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Many women just don't understand how to train or command a dog.

The absolute worst breed that I have seen for manners and behavior are Pugs, Simply Terrible little Beasts, My Wife had 2 when we Married, her Sister had 2 a Good Friend of mine had one, and I have been around countless others, I have yet to see a Pug that is well mannered, never mind obeys any commands.

If anything ever happened to my Wife, and I was meeting women again, a Pug (though they seem to be acquired in pairs most often) would be an Instant Deal Breaker, I simply will not subject myself to that breed again, and I have had dogs, except for short periods, all my Life.

Doug :cheers:
Haha I've had 3 growing up and my brother had one all were great. Listened and responded well and their personalities were unbelievable. The only problem we had was one of the males would **** in my father's boots once a week. Back up over the boot and drop a squat never missed and only my dad's boots.

Sent from my E6910 using Tapatalk
 

sb47

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Dogs are like little children, there constantly trying to test what they can get away with. Training is a never ending task. Many people don't have the patience to stay with it. They don't understand how a dogs mind works. Some dogs are easy and some are not. Most dogs have a one track mind and you have to create a distraction in a way that changes what they focus on. They are very observative and get distracted by many things. It can be a challenge to keep them focused on what you want them to do. They give a dog a command a few times and if the dog does not respond they start raising there voice in frustration. Dogs hear very well, you don't need to raise your voice, they can hear you just fine. It's your tone, lowering your voices an octave and not the volume works much better. Men have a deeper tone and thats why they respond to men better. Dogs communicate with body language as well as verbal commands. Thats why you can train a dog with hand signals with no verbal commands at all. You have to be calm and consistent and give positive rewards when they get it right. You should never hit a dog, it only make them not want to respond, you can get better response from the tone of your voice followed by a partitive response. I can make the most aggressive dog calm down by my body language and verbal tone.
I demonstrated that just recently with a friends very aggressive German shepherd that would bite almost everyone.Even the owner. In 5 min that dog was my best friend, and the owner said that dog had never responded like that with anyone else. You can never show fear, you have to be confident and become there alpha.
 

lone wolf

MS 200T King
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Oct 5, 2009
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Prowling The Pine Barrens
Dogs are like little children, there constantly trying to test what they can get away with. Training is a never ending task. Many people don't have the patience to stay with it. They don't understand how a dogs mind works. Some dogs are easy and some are not. Most dogs have a one track mind and you have to create a distraction in a way that changes what they focus on. They are very observative and get distracted by many things. It can be a challenge to keep them focused on what you want them to do. They give a dog a command a few times and if the dog does not respond they start raising there voice in frustration. Dogs hear very well, you don't need to raise your voice, they can hear you just fine. It's your tone, lowering your voices an octave and not the volume works much better. Men have a deeper tone and thats why they respond to men better. Dogs communicate with body language as well as verbal commands. Thats why you can train a dog with hand signals with no verbal commands at all. You have to be calm and consistent and give positive rewards when they get it right. You should never hit a dog, it only make them not want to respond, you can get better response from the tone of your voice followed by a partitive response. I can make the most aggressive dog calm down by my body language and verbal tone.
I demonstrated that just recently with a friends very aggressive German shepherd that would bite almost everyone.Even the owner. In 5 min that dog was my best friend, and the owner said that dog had never responded like that with anyone else. You can never show fear, you have to be confident and become there alpha.
Sounds like you have been around a lot of dogs.
 

sb47

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What do you have now?

Actually My last dog died about 4 years ago and I haven't gotten another one yet. I also raised horses and still had my horse up till about 5 months ago. I had that horse for 20 years. I'm down to just a yard full of chickens right now. But I have plenty of friends that have dogs so when I need some dog lovin I just use theirs. I'm enjoying not having a dog under foot 24/7 and having to find someone to take care of them when I travel. I have had over 100 dogs over the years and really good dogs are far and few so I have had my share of retards. My last one was absolutely the best dog I have ever had.
She was a boxer I got from the pound. Dogs that good only come around once or twice in a lifetime. I'm working with a friends German shepherd that is going to be one of those once in a lifetime dogs. This dog is supper smart and is so easy to train. I've been working with him for 2 years with both verbal and hand signals. I've been training the owners as much as the dog.
I am looking for another dog and another horse, but choosing the right one is a challenge because Having had so many I know what it want and most importantly, what I don't. Nothing is free and animals cost a lot of money and I'm using that money for other things right now, I'm helping my brother thats on dialysis and on disability and my 85 year old mother that has no income. So I have no extra money for animals at this time.
 

sb47

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I like training horses as much as dogs. Horses have a much different mind set. They are fight or flight. They are visual creatures and associate visuals with good and bad experiences.

This lady explains how a horse thinks.




 

esshup

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What's a lurcher? It looks like an English Springer Spaniel but it's nose looks a wee bit long. I have had Spaniels for a long time, and wile they are house dogs, they are hunters. Whistle, hand signals and voice trained.

I've had people over and they say "Your dogs are better trained than my kids/" I just keep my mouth shut.........
 

sb47

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What's a lurcher? It looks like an English Springer Spaniel but it's nose looks a wee bit long. I have had Spaniels for a long time, and wile they are house dogs, they are hunters. Whistle, hand signals and voice trained.

I've had people over and they say "Your dogs are better trained than my kids/" I just keep my mouth shut.........

Dog breeds are not clones so your gonna get variations within the same breed. The AKC and UKC is very lax in enforcing and verifying registration papers. People will fake papers in order to make more money from selling so called pure breeds. It's very prevalent in puppy mils.
 

oologahan

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Jun 10, 2017
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Yeah, I was just going to mention the similarities. Most people don't know how to train their kids either.
Most often training children is best accomplished with a strong father mother team. Single mothers have trouble with raising children alone without a father. It's not that they are bad, but rather they make decisions based on emotions rather than what's best for the child.
 
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