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would YOU buy a 562xp?

Andyshine77

Andyshine77

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What did Husqvarna and Stihl revolutionize about "fuel delivery"? Never heard of that before! If you mean AT/MT, these systems were existant for years, it is only now that two stroke adapted them. The only clever thing they did was bring out so many patents about the systems that no one else would ever have a chance to develop any thing anymore with out comming into conflict. Similar with stratofied engine technology. Decades old technique, just that Zenoah brought out a bunch of patents that no one wanted to fight against. So the simple solution, Stihl bought user rights and Husqvarna bought the company... This is just a typical sign of our time!

I have nothing against "growing pains". Absolutely to be expected and totally normal and nothing special. BUT growing pains for 4-5 years... Sorry but that is for me kind of strange situation. Not a single car brand would survive if they had that type of track record of "growing pains"! And cars are eons more complicated...

But I do credit that Stihl obviously had their "chit" together, although they are not considerd by some fan boys here to be the evolutionary top of the line. To be honest I would much rather buy a Stihl than a Husqvarna because there are about ZERO problems about their system! And when they had a problem they had the cojones to pull a complete line of saw(661), which must have cost them quite a bit of money, and only returned when the problem was solved!

Further I DO credit Dolmar for bringing out their own clever system of stratofied technology without having to buy into any patents of other companies.

So IF we are critisizing any companies of throwing "old technology" onto the market, well sorry but there isn't anyone out there that can be excluded!

7
I almost completely agree, except Stihl has had issues with the Mtronic system, I've seen it myself.

You are correct there is nothing radically different in the basic design. Blaming the epa is an excuse as well, the manufacturers have to work within the constrains they are given.
 

svk

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What did Husqvarna and Stihl revolutionize about "fuel delivery"? Never heard of that before! If you mean AT/MT, these systems were existant for years, it is only now that two stroke adapted them. The only clever thing they did was bring out so many patents about the systems that no one else would ever have a chance to develop any thing anymore with out comming into conflict. Similar with stratofied engine technology. Decades old technique, just that Zenoah brought out a bunch of patents that no one wanted to fight against. So the simple solution, Stihl bought user rights and Husqvarna bought the company... This is just a typical sign of our time!
You can word it any way you want, it wasn't on a chainsaw before the two major players took initiative.
 
NIP Group
weimedog

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I guess another thing I consider, and that is where things are at this point in time. I'm not going to argue the case for a particular companies development strategy. The question is can you recommend now. Not in 2013. Right now in 2016. If the product was not developed any further than where it was in 2012...knowing what I know not I wouldn't recommend one. After the case and carb upgrades along with other details like pull starts and thing....where the product is now I can. That with the historical knowledge of where the problems were and where the changes are as of this point in time. Whether or not you approve of a companies approach is a completely different topic than where a particular product is in its development cycle relative to its market/design intent. The ones ordered from Husqvarna 2015-2016 and in the stores 2016 are significantly improved from a reliability perspective than those delivered in the 2012 time frame. My bet is the ones ordered 2016 delivered to the dealers late 2016/2017 will be improved as well. It's the modus operandi for Husqvarna and most of the other better brands. So you have to decide if punishing the brand answers the question of where the 562 is at this point in its product development cycle. To me those are two completely different topics/questions. I also have to admit its become a bit of a hobby to take blown up 2012/13's and building them to 2015 specs....and seeing the guys who gave up those saws reaction to the results. But not being a business or a builder gives me latitude...:)
 
weimedog

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True!! but also pathetic and decades late.
Actually you can credit EPA for forcing the technology. And if you use the automotive industry as a sign of things to come, those who invested and solved the issues advanced the state of the automotive art. Not a bad thing. I remember when EFI was developed for single cylinder four strokes in the motorcycle industry. Wasn't a slam dunk there either.. :) took a while. Remember things like the first off road applications dealing with the slides/throttle position devices being moved simply from the rough landings and typical hard off road riding...having them jolted shut off jumps wasn't a good thing. Some will remember the CRF250's issues...:)
 

svk

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I guess another thing I consider, and that is where things are at this point in time. I'm not going to argue the case for a particular companies development strategy. The question is can you recommend now. Not in 2013. Right now in 2016. If the product was not developed any further than where it was in 2012...knowing what I know not I wouldn't recommend one. After the case and carb upgrades along with other details like pull starts and thing....where the product is now I can. That with the historical knowledge of where the problems were and where the changes are as of this point in time. Whether or not you approve of a companies approach is a completely different topic than where a particular product is in its development cycle relative to its market/design intent. The ones ordered from Husqvarna 2015-2016 and in the stores 2016 are significantly improved from a reliability perspective than those delivered in the 2012 time frame. My bet is the ones ordered 2016 delivered to the dealers late 2016/2017 will be improved as well. It's the modus operandi for Husqvarna and most of the other better brands. So you have to decide if punishing the brand answers the question of where the 562 is at this point in its product development cycle. To me those are two completely different topics/questions. I also have to admit its become a bit of a hobby to take blown up 2012/13's and building them to 2015 specs....and seeing the guys who gave up those saws reaction to the results. But not being a business or a builder gives me latitude...:)
Right here! :clap:
 
Andyshine77

Andyshine77

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I guess another thing I consider, and that is where things are at this point in time. I'm not going to argue the case for a particular companies development strategy. The question is can you recommend now. Not in 2013. Right now in 2016. If the product was not developed any further than where it was in 2012...knowing what I know not I wouldn't recommend one. After the case and carb upgrades along with other details like pull starts and thing....where the product is now I can. That with the historical knowledge of where the problems were and where the changes are as of this point in time. Where or not you approve of a companies approach is a completely different topic than where a particular product is in its development cycle relative to its market/design intent. The ones ordered from Husqvarna 2015-2016 and in the stores 2016 are significantly improved from a reliability perspective than those delivered in the 2012 time frame. My bet is the ones ordered 2016 delivered to the dealers late 2016/2017 will be improved as well. It's the modus operandi for Husqvarna and most of the other better brands. So you have to decide if punishing the brand answers the question of where the 562 is at this point in its product development cycle. To me those are two completely different topics/questions. I also have to admit its become a bit of a hobby to take blown up 2012/13's and building them to 2015 specs....and seeing the guys who gave up those saws reaction to the results. But not being a business gives me latitude...:)
We'll said.

The reason I would not recommend them is based on the past history, and the fact the feature history is still unknown. Just because they seem fine today, doesn't mean they will be tomorrow. If I depended on a saw to make ends meet, I wouldn't base my decisions on what amounts to a guess.
 
weimedog

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We'll said.

The reason I would not recommend them is based on the past history, and the fact the feature history is still unknown. Just because they seem fine today, doesn't mean they will be tomorrow. If I depended on a saw to make ends meet, I wouldn't base my decisions on what amounts to a guess.
Very true. And dealer support along with manufacturers support to those dealers is critical to the success of a product launch. Because there is a game of statistics with any saw from any brand. A crap dealer and/or manufacturer makes that a miserable experience for an end user.

(not to be a PITA but a "Hot Start" issue to a forest fire fighter probably wouldn't be appreciated)
 
Andyshine77

Andyshine77

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Very true. And dealer support along with manufacturers support to those dealers is critical to the success of a product launch. Because there is a game of statistics with any saw from any brand. A crap dealer and/or manufacturer makes that a miserable experience for an end user.

(not to be a PITA but a "Hot Start" issue to a forest fire fighter probably wouldn't be appreciated)
I think our dealer treats us pretty well.

Again not trying to portray the 562 in an overall negative light, my opinion is what it is.
 
Chris-PA

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This thread is actually going better than I expected it would - some people who like and respect each other having a conversation where they don't exactly agree, but it's still respectful and friendly.

What did Husqvarna and Stihl revolutionize about "fuel delivery"? Never heard of that before! If you mean AT/MT, these systems were existant for years, it is only now that two stroke adapted them. The only clever thing they did was bring out so many patents about the systems that no one else would ever have a chance to develop any thing anymore with out comming into conflict. Similar with stratofied engine technology. Decades old technique, just that Zenoah brought out a bunch of patents that no one wanted to fight against. So the simple solution, Stihl bought user rights and Husqvarna bought the company... This is just a typical sign of our time!

I have nothing against "growing pains". Absolutely to be expected and totally normal and nothing special. BUT growing pains for 4-5 years... Sorry but that is for me kind of a strange situation for such a large company. Not a single car brand would survive if they had that type of track record of "growing pains"! And cars are eons more complicated...

But I do credit that Stihl obviously had their "chit" together, although they are not considerd by some fan boys here to be the evolutionary top of the line. To be honest I would much rather recomend or buy a Stihl than a Husqvarna because there are about ZERO problems about their system! And when they had a problem they had the cojones to pull a complete line of saw(661), which must have cost them quite a bit of money, and only returned when the problem was solved!

Further I DO credit Dolmar for bringing out their own clever system of stratofied technology without having to buy into any patents of other companies.

So IF we are critisizing any companies of throwing "old technology" onto the market, well sorry but there isn't anyone out there that can be excluded!

7
And here I must disagree on several technical points my friend. Both AT and strato are new technologies and are specifically related to either 2-stroke engines or these all-position fuel systems on o p e. Zenoah's unfortunately named strato has nothing to do with the stratified charge systems employed on 4-stroke automobiles in the 1970's. With those the fuel mixture was "stratified", or non-mixed, at the time of combustion. These stratos keep the fuel separated from the air in order to delay the arrival of fuel into the combustion chamber as long as possible, reducing losses out the open exhaust port, but the mixture is supposed to be well mixed at the time of ignition.

AT has very little to do with the feedback carbs of the 1970's and 80's either, other than the fact that it uses an electrically operated fuel control valve. What's new is that it does feedback control using almost no sensors at all, only rpm. That wouldn't work on a real carb, only on these all position carbs with their atrocious fuel mixture control.

I think Husqvarna blundered into several unintended consequence in their attempt to gather several new technologies and solve some very long standing major emissions problems concerning 2-strokes and these lousy fuel systems. The industry had been stagnant for decades, and there were bound to be some problems playing catch up at that pace. First, I think they didn't realize just what all the effects of all that excess fuel hanging around were (i.e. cooling). Second, I think they lost sight of the reality that even the AT fuel system is still crude and grossly inaccurate when not in closed loop, and that's a large part of the time - and they tried to dial it down too tight. Last, I think they misjudged the problems involved with rolling out the first new technology in many decades to the dealer and service network. Still, I give them credit for actually trying to solve the problems, with what are simple and elegant technical solutions - rather than just slapping on a cat.
 
a. palmer jr.

a. palmer jr.

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Actually you can credit EPA for forcing the technology. And if you use the automotive industry as a sign of things to come, those who invested and solved the issues advanced the state of the automotive art. Not a bad thing. I remember when EFI was developed for single cylinder four strokes in the motorcycle industry. Wasn't a slam dunk there either.. :) took a while. Remember things like the first off road applications dealing with the slides/throttle position devices being moved simply from the rough landings and typical hard off road riding...having them jolted shut off jumps wasn't a good thing. Some will remember the CRF250's issues...:)
Yeah, the EPA is so good they can find problems that don't even exist!
 
CrufflerJJ

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The filter issue on the 562 has been fixed, they now seal tight. The fit between the filter and filter mount on my order 550 is very sloppy.

Sent from my HTC One_M8 using Tapatalk
Any idea when the change was made to 562XP saws to fix the filtration problem? My 2014 saw does a poor job of keeping fines out of the air inlet (even when I start with a clean OEM filter). I recently "built up" the lip on the filter mount with Permatex black gasket sealer, and have yet to take the saw for a spin. I DO know that the fit between filter & filter mount is a lot tighter now.

air-intake.jpg
 
CoreyB

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Any idea when the change was made to 562XP saws to fix the filtration problem? My 2014 saw does a poor job of keeping fines out of the air inlet (even when I start with a clean OEM filter). I recently "built up" the lip on the filter mount with Permatex black gasket sealer, and have yet to take the saw for a spin. I DO know that the fit between filter & filter mount is a lot tighter now.

View attachment 508807
Looks like assault dust to me.
 
Andyshine77

Andyshine77

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Any idea when the change was made to 562XP saws to fix the filtration problem? My 2014 saw does a poor job of keeping fines out of the air inlet (even when I start with a clean OEM filter). I recently "built up" the lip on the filter mount with Permatex black gasket sealer, and have yet to take the saw for a spin. I DO know that the fit between filter & filter mount is a lot tighter now.

View attachment 508807
I believe they just improved fitment between the filter mount and filter itself.
 
Idahonative

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That is a very good description of a 562.


Very well written, many good points in this post! Also what does HTSS stand for?

Agree. Regarding the fanboys, it does get pretty old. And their extreme redundancy will cause folks to buy that product when they probably should have bought something else that fit their needs better. I guess I try to look at things objectively and if I want the best saw in each class it is going to mean having a stable full of multiple brands. I bought a Dolmar because that was the best 30cc saw out there for my needs and have been thrilled. Same with my 550 and 562. If I was in the market for a 70 cc class saw the 461 would be my runaway first choice with the 7900 a somewhat distant second choice.

Secondly, to address the technology. As Sawtroll has pointed out a few times, some of the "runner up" brands are using technology that is many years old for their flagship models. That is fine. But you have to give credit to Husky and Stihl for putting their necks out and revolutionizing fuel delivery. For those who know outboard motors you will remember what OMC tried with the Ficht technology and it literally cost them the company when it failed. Obviously Husky and Stihl took a more conservative approach but a few growing pains are expected.
Can you not see that you are what you accuse others of being?
 

svk

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Should I view ignored content? Naw I think I'll catch some z's.

See you all in the morning.
 
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