A corded Electric Chainsaw /review

MFV

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Not to hijack this thread,, but these are my experiences with some corded saws. I've had the MSE180 & MSE220 Stihls, as well as the Makita, Milwaukee (old all metal) and a small Echo rated at a ridiculous 3.25 horsepower. Also an old Sears Craftsman 12 Amp. The Stihls are the best with the Makita in a close third to to MSE180. The Makita is the only one with variable speed. The 220 Stihl and Milwaukee run regular 3/8 and have the torque to pull it. The Sears was weak and pretty much junk. The Echo is ok for an occasional homeowner, though new it had issues with the triggers connection. It sure AIN'T no 3.25 horses though. The Milwaukee had very low chain speed, but high torque. And the 220 cut like 70cc power with less chain speed. I'd love to see the new MSE250 vs the 220, which is heavier with Mag casting in its construction. I haven't run my Stihl E30 yet. At 50 lbs (powerhead only) give or take, I'm in no hurry to either, though it runs 1/2" chipper chain.You can see some electric saw comparison video's at my YouTube channel "sawfun1"
No doubt electric motors have a lot of torque and pretty quick acceleration
 

Wow

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Yes here it has to be UL listed/approved otherwise more dangerous for you then a runaway chainsaw
Thanks. An electric motor on the saw needs some type of Starting device probably as good as on an air compressor. More than likely solid state in this saw.
I've ruled out a short circuit in the wiring.
It seems unlikely the trigger switch could be sticking in the ON position because IF SO the safety switch should open and stop the motor even with a stuck trigger switch. But IF the the Trigger and safety switches are BOTH open AND POWER is still being applied to the motor, the reasonable mind would assume there is ANOTHER Component failure.
Back about 1968 my old Starter solenoid stuck ON and damaged the flywheel. Even with the Key off the starter stayed engaged in the flywheel with the motor running. My guess a solid State or something is keeping power applied to the Motor regardless of the switches. So my external in line safety switch which opens the Black wire feeding the saw is going to be fine. I did call. I did ask for a schematic and have yet to see one. Thanks.
 

MFV

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Thanks. An electric motor on the saw needs some type of Starting device probably as good as on an air compressor. More than likely solid state in this saw.
I've ruled out a short circuit in the wiring.
It seems unlikely the trigger switch could be sticking in the ON position because IF SO the safety switch should open and stop the motor even with a stuck trigger switch. But IF the the Trigger and safety switches are BOTH open AND POWER is still being applied to the motor, the reasonable mind would assume there is ANOTHER Component failure.
Back about 1968 my old Starter solenoid stuck ON and damaged the flywheel. Even with the Key off the starter stayed engaged in the flywheel with the motor running. My guess a solid State or something is keeping power applied to the Motor regardless of the switches. So my external in line safety switch which opens the Black wire feeding the saw is going to be fine. I did call. I did ask for a schematic and have yet to see one. Thanks.
Hard to guess how something would be wired. A lot of stuff we have at work has dead man switch operated by your foot so if you get hung up the equipment turns off when you move your foot or fall down which ever happens first. I do work with instrument, electric and controls so it would be interesting to see how it is wired
 

Wow

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Hard to guess how something would be wired. A lot of stuff we have at work has dead man switch operated by your foot so if you get hung up the equipment turns off when you move your foot or fall down which ever happens first. I do work with instrument, electric and controls so it would be interesting to see how it is wired
Yes, I like that idea. I'm retired from industry like 35 years ago back in the day I got around. There was a plant in Georgia, maybe, Vidalia, they had a machine that used a powderd plastic and made electrical plastic like for Breaker boxes etc. Until I repaired it the nearest repairman was in England. The manual hydraulic presses using plastic Moulds was opened, filled closed, parts removed and repeat. The operators were ladies. We had Double push and hold spring loaded Normally Open switches. BOTH HANDS needed to operate. We placed those switches so far apart no one could press both with one hand ever. Those switches were tested regularly. Back in 1968 I saw Microwave Ovens. Industrial none in homes. They had 440 ac volts. People actually warmed lunches in them when no bosses were around. I worked on them and they broke pretty often. They had 4 huge rectifier TUBES a big tube that kinda served as a magnatron.
I'd been a hard working kid and longed for hard work. About 1990 I gave up 75 bucks per hour removed my tie and started Tree and farm lawn service. I began working out again and got fit. It's nice being educated but hard work makes me feel better at the end of the day. Thanks
 
Old2stroke

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Thanks. An electric motor on the saw needs some type of Starting device probably as good as on an air compressor. More than likely solid state in this saw.
I've ruled out a short circuit in the wiring.
It seems unlikely the trigger switch could be sticking in the ON position because IF SO the safety switch should open and stop the motor even with a stuck trigger switch. But IF the the Trigger and safety switches are BOTH open AND POWER is still being applied to the motor, the reasonable mind would assume there is ANOTHER Component failure.
Back about 1968 my old Starter solenoid stuck ON and damaged the flywheel. Even with the Key off the starter stayed engaged in the flywheel with the motor running. My guess a solid State or something is keeping power applied to the Motor regardless of the switches. So my external in line safety switch which opens the Black wire feeding the saw is going to be fine. I did call. I did ask for a schematic and have yet to see one. Thanks.
These will be brush/commutator motors, so nothing special to start them. As stated before, I believe there will be some sort of cheap latch function (solid state or mechanical) built into the trigger assembly that is sticking on. Power from the trigger would latch it on as long as the brake switch was closed and either switch opening should unlatch it. If the trigger switch assembly looks to be a molded unit that can't be taken apart, there is probably a solid state function buried inside. Parts diag. will probably show only the trigger switch and the brake switch. The manufacturer will have found the cheapest way to make the saw safe.
 

Wow

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These will be brush/commutator motors, so nothing special to start them. As stated before, I believe there will be some sort of cheap latch function (solid state or mechanical) built into the trigger assembly that is sticking on. Power from the trigger would latch it on as long as the brake switch was closed and either switch opening should unlatch it. If the trigger switch assembly looks to be a molded unit that can't be taken apart, there is probably a solid state function buried inside. Parts diag. will probably show only the trigger switch and the brake switch. The manufacturer will have found the cheapest way to make the saw safe.
What you say is EXACTLY what I thought.
Here is what happened in feal time.
When the trigger was released the saw kept running. Then to shut it off I pushed the hand brake FORWARD. The chain stopped immediately.
The motor began loud humming and began overheating.
Now it would be highly unlikely both switches failed at the same time.
So after the MAIN switch was opened the power to saw off the saw was left to cool.
The hand lever PULLED TOWARD the saw to release the chain.
Main extension cord switch was off. Saw setting on the ground. Both switches cycled. Trigger switch toggled several times. Main extension cord switch flipped on Saw chain starts running. Power cord flipped off saw stops. Trigger switch toggled hand brake switch FORWARD. Power cord switch flipped on. Saw should have no applied power with safety brake on but motor grows and tries to run. The chain is locked the motor is struggling to run getting hot. At this point are both switches stuck?
After 4/5 times of this and much toggling of both of the switches finally when extension cord switch is on the saw stopped running. Everytime the power switch was flipped on powering up the supply the saw motor powered up. Finally after a lot of toggling and power cord on and off the saw works correctly.
In my mind IF the trigger switch is stuck closed. WHY did the safety switch not stop power to the motor???
Thankfully My extension cord has a cut off switch which I installed years ago as a safety measure. Infact there's a switch on both ends of the power cord because when my grandkids are using the cord I wanted to have the ability to shut power off quickly. If something goes wrong the power cord can be turned off immediately. Thankfully that quick response saved the saw motor.
When I toggled the trigger it clicks as if it good.
Now saw working properly. This saw has done this a few times
Like you say. It seems like the Trigger switch is sticking BUT why did the safety switch not stop power from the motor?????
. Testing shows both switches working well now.
With safety switch open Hand brake FORWARD all the way clicking in place. The trigger can't make motor run which is exactly what should happen
This problem should be on a test!!!!.
There is ONE likely hood.
What IF (I play this game often), what IF, for some reason. The safety hand brake switch LOCKED the motor BUT after doing that it DIDN'T actually actuate the power off switch like it should. Could it be the hand switch failed to cut power but locked brake anyway ?
If so WHY?
Was it not fully engaged?
Is it possible to be engaged to the point of locking the chain but not engaged enough to open the safety switch.
Could it be BOTH SWITCHES have gotten sawdust in them and both failed at the same time?
Like I said. This should be a final exam question. Thanks
 

Wow

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I'm (when I get time) going to put an meter across the plug.
UPDATE:
So the Saw DOES NOT have a second on off switch.
The emergency
hand brake is Mechanically connected to the Main Trigger Switch which when activated is SUPPOSED to by mechanical means release part of the
Main Trigger switch in turn removing power to the motor.
The FAILURE in my saw is THE MAIN TRIGGER switch.
Evidently the inside points have failed to open. Now there is NO power CUT OFF EXCEPT by an external switch. Switches are more prone to arc and burn contacts when opened or closed under Amp draw (load). With AC power it's not easy to build a switch that will not arc. I'm the only user of this saw and I've never used the trigger switch with the saw buried in wood. My guess is the switch is simply worn out. Switches in houses do that so I guess It's normal wear.
No more use than this saw sees I'm not going to try to replace the switch Because the failure means by use of an external switch the saw works. However the hand brake Will stop the saw in an emergency. By having an external switch the saw is useable by an experienced operator and no one else will be using it. End of my story except. Anyone buying a Worx 303 should be aware that I've read on line that OTHER people have stated the saw trigger Switch has been known to fail. Mine is constantly running. Switches can fail ON or OFF. I feel lucky mine is ON. Because I'm able to build a external switch and keep using the saw without bothering to spend precious time fixing it. Short cuts are ok as long as the Safety feature is there.
 
joe25DA

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I’ve seen a couple WORX items that looked neat. I even had that convertible wheelbarrow thing, got it marked way down since it was a display. I sold it to a guy in town since my Jackson wheelbarrow worked. The worx, ego or ergo, ryobi stuff basically everything from a box store I’d have exceedingly low expectations for. As far as performance, reliability, quality goes if it came from Lowe’s Home Depot or the like expect none of the above.
 

Wow

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These will be brush/commutator motors, so nothing special to start them. As stated before, I believe there will be some sort of cheap latch function (solid state or mechanical) built into the trigger assembly that is sticking on. Power from the trigger would latch it on as long as the brake switch was closed and either switch opening should unlatch it. If the trigger switch assembly looks to be a molded unit that can't be taken apart, there is probably a solid state function buried inside. Parts diag. will probably show only the trigger switch and the brake switch. The manufacturer will have found the cheapest way to make the saw safe.
Well I finally took time to take the saw apart.
It's got brushes, 2 of them. The start system is a Shaded Pole. Simple.
There IS NOT a second switch in the brake. It's mechanical.
The trigger switch is a Double switch assembly. The Trigger had NO SWITCH. It mechanically closes TWO switches in tandem. Both the Ground and hot wires are opened when the switches are open. When the motor over heated the last time it melted a plastic part and froze the saw up. There are many sellable parts if I strip it down clean the parts and sell on eBay. Just the side cover is 20/ 25 bucks. Everything except the motor is good. The brushes look new. The Worx 310 pole saw is an 8 amp saw 10 inch bar. I removed the saw from the pole and now use that little saw to trim my firewood. It's doing a great job so I see no reason to buy another Worx 303.1.
A friend bought a Portland from HF and paid around 50 bucks. The Worx for 50 bucks DOESN'T HAVE AUTOMATICALLY oiler. I despise a saw that requires my thumb to pump.
All one has to do is LOOK at the oil cap on a saw. IF it has a primer bulb, you ARE the oil pump.
The facts are, some people actually need an electric saw. They don't run petrol enough to keep a saw alive.
I'm not THAT guy but for cutting a couple of sticks of wood off once a week an 8 amp saw does fine as long as my thumb ain't expected to be the oiler.
 
Old2stroke

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Well I finally took time to take the saw apart.
It's got brushes, 2 of them. The start system is a Shaded Pole. Simple.
There IS NOT a second switch in the brake. It's mechanical.
The trigger switch is a Double switch assembly. The Trigger had NO SWITCH. It mechanically closes TWO switches in tandem. Both the Ground and hot wires are opened when the switches are open. When the motor over heated the last time it melted a plastic part and froze the saw up. There are many sellable parts if I strip it down clean the parts and sell on eBay. Just the side cover is 20/ 25 bucks. Everything except the motor is good. The brushes look new. The Worx 310 pole saw is an 8 amp saw 10 inch bar. I removed the saw from the pole and now use that little saw to trim my firewood. It's doing a great job so I see no reason to buy another Worx 303.1.
A friend bought a Portland from HF and paid around 50 bucks. The Worx for 50 bucks DOESN'T HAVE AUTOMATICALLY oiler. I despise a saw that requires my thumb to pump.
All one has to do is LOOK at the oil cap on a saw. IF it has a primer bulb, you ARE the oil pump.
The facts are, some people actually need an electric saw. They don't run petrol enough to keep a saw alive.
I'm not THAT guy but for cutting a couple of sticks of wood off once a week an 8 amp saw does fine as long as my thumb ain't expected to be the oiler.
Good to hear what's inside the beast. I agree that there is a good use for corded electric saws that some people only need for the occasional light use. Many people buy a cheap one and find out later that it is not an auto oiler and are a little disappointed when I tell them what they have to do to make the damn thing oil.
 
GeorgiaVol

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Interesting thread.
I have had a Poulan electric model PLN3516 for several years and have used it a ton for smaller stuff around the house. Never had any issues other than a worn out chain. The tool-less tension system is actually super easy on this one and it has an electric brake that stops the chain the second you let off the trigger. It also has a kickback brake, but I have yet to have need of it. Rated at 3.5 hp. No idea how accurate that is, but it will cut a 16" oak log, slower than my gas saws obviously, but it will do it.
Nice to have something lightweight that I can just plug in to cut a few branches when needed. Just my 2 cents on this particular electric saw.
 
Jasonrkba

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Nice to read somthing different once in a while. I really dislike electric saws but I do own a dewalt battery operated pole saw and really like it. This may be an option for those avoiding gasoline.
 
Volund

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I have a husqvarna 220 volt saw - probably made by makita, about 2 kw.
It's like a diesel compared to a gas saw, tourque right from the bottom, wont stop at anything.
It have a chain brake like a gas saw and it works just like a gas saw, nice to use at the property at the sawbuck.
You need a 70cc to match it's low rpm torque.
 
sawfun

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I have a husqvarna 220 volt saw - probably made by makita, about 2 kw.
It's like a diesel compared to a gas saw, tourque right from the bottom, wont stop at anything.
It have a chain brake like a gas saw and it works just like a gas saw, nice to use at the property at the sawbuck.
You need a 70cc to match it's low rpm torque.
I found the same of a Stihl MSE220.
 

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