Adjusting to a different type of work, at least for now

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PA. Woodsman

PA. Woodsman

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I got such nice email responses from my boss and the owner of the company, that made me feel somewhat better. I didn't quite know how they would react, I had seen them get downright nasty when some people quit over the years but that was PRE Covid, this plague has knocked them down some pegs and I think they realize and understand that life is changed forever, people now have to do what they have to do, and I spoke honestly and from the heart and they respected that and like they said I WAS a very good employee over all the 21.5 years and they appreciated me letting them know so they can move on when the time comes too. And perhaps they were a bit relieved, they might have been wondering and worrying how I felt about not being called back or maybe part time at best, so it'll all work out. I just hope that they can make the comeback in this economy, it will be a tough road to hoe if they do try to make it, people don't have money or if they do they are holding onto it, afraid and watching what will happen next.

And I was feeling like someone died this morning, I am not ashamed to admit that I actually broke down and cried, a lot of pent up emotion and wondering and worrying what to do is coming out, it wasn't supposed to end this way but it did, I thought I would work there until I retired, but I get a grip and move on. At least I have the job to put my energies into, it would be really rough if I was unemployed!
 
OM617YOTA

OM617YOTA

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Best of luck to you.

The world really is a different place now. Very different expectations, both for the person signing the front of the paycheck, and the person signing the back. I hope your drive and desire to do the right thing and be up front with others doesn't cause you grief.
 
Dave Hadden

Dave Hadden

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May 26, 2007
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Campbell River, BC
I sat in on a demonstration today by a guy who sells equipment to help people with low vision see things a bit better, one was a closed circuit computer that actually could read books to them but it costs $3,995.00 and another hand held magnifier that sells for $595.00 and a few others. I can't tell you the feeling that I had as I sat there and looked around the room at these people who have very poor vision, my heart sank and I wished that I could help them restore their vision, but yet they deal with it with a grace and spirit that just amazes me, and it makes my problems seem insignificant compared to what they must deal with, but they don't let it stop them or get them down, truly amazing what they bring......


My Grandmother, born in Alabama in 1904, was totally blind and I had her for over 50 years. As a child, one of the first things I was trusted with was guiding Granny around as required, trying to keep her from walking into something or getting lost or whatever. The Canadian National Institute for the Blind had a building in New Westminster and we often went there on Friday nights for Bingo and then dancing for the adults and cake and ice cream for me and my sisters.
Growing up among partially sighted and totally blind people, some of whom had been blinded from burns or explosions etc. I learned to treat handicapped and disfigured people as just ordinary folk, which they were to me. I also learned empathy, something I see as badly missing in so many people.
My Granny, despite being blind, enjoyed a multitude of activities, ranging from bowling, fishing, going to the pub for a few beers, dancing and playing cards. Give her a deck of cards, a glass of wine and a crib-board and she'd beat your butt all the way home plus take all your quarters. She was the British Columbia CNIB Crib Champion two different years and was a really good card player. We always accused her of using marked cards of course, given she used Braille cards to identify what they were.
Although having never gone to normal school, she could type and, naturally, read Braille, learned while at the School for the Blind at Talladega, Alabama. She also married Grandad when she was 17, had my Mom when she was 18 and raised her while keeping house, cooking, cleaning and all that.
She often babysat my two sisters and I and we'd try all kinds of ways of sneaking around but she'd always hear us and send us back to bed.
I have always admired the way handicapped people cope and the way they don't pity themselves and all that stuff.
I sure wouldn't want to be blind myself, though. Tough thing to cope with.

Good on you for noticing the characteristics they have and for taking a job that is helpful and needed.



Take care.
 
PA. Woodsman

PA. Woodsman

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
May 1, 2006
Messages
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Location
Emmaus, Pennsylvania
My Grandmother, born in Alabama in 1904, was totally blind and I had her for over 50 years. As a child, one of the first things I was trusted with was guiding Granny around as required, trying to keep her from walking into something or getting lost or whatever. The Canadian National Institute for the Blind had a building in New Westminster and we often went there on Friday nights for Bingo and then dancing for the adults and cake and ice cream for me and my sisters.
Growing up among partially sighted and totally blind people, some of whom had been blinded from burns or explosions etc. I learned to treat handicapped and disfigured people as just ordinary folk, which they were to me. I also learned empathy, something I see as badly missing in so many people.
My Granny, despite being blind, enjoyed a multitude of activities, ranging from bowling, fishing, going to the pub for a few beers, dancing and playing cards. Give her a deck of cards, a glass of wine and a crib-board and she'd beat your butt all the way home plus take all your quarters. She was the British Columbia CNIB Crib Champion two different years and was a really good card player. We always accused her of using marked cards of course, given she used Braille cards to identify what they were.
Although having never gone to normal school, she could type and, naturally, read Braille, learned while at the School for the Blind at Talladega, Alabama. She also married Grandad when she was 17, had my Mom when she was 18 and raised her while keeping house, cooking, cleaning and all that.
She often babysat my two sisters and I and we'd try all kinds of ways of sneaking around but she'd always hear us and send us back to bed.
I have always admired the way handicapped people cope and the way they don't pity themselves and all that stuff.
I sure wouldn't want to be blind myself, though. Tough thing to cope with.

Good on you for noticing the characteristics they have and for taking a job that is helpful and needed.



Take care.
Thank you for sharing this incredible story, and God Bless you for taking care of her!

Everyday I am seeing more and more of these wonderful people and how they deal with what life has dealt them. One woman was shot in the head 3 years ago, somehow a "stray" bullet came through her wall, hit her in the head, and she is totally blind, yet she has the most amazing attitude about life, such an inspiration that I am going to use her story, a woman who started at our place a short while ago wants to hear some stories about the clients, their achievements big and small, well to me this is "huge"...such an inspiration!!
 

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