Best firewood handling gloves

calamari

calamari

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I've come to the conclusion that I must have been using the wroing gloves for splitting and stacking firewood. I've bought good qualiity gloves that were rubber coated, plain leather, plain leather that I've coated with tube weather stripping and rubber gloves I've coated with the same stuff. The bark on our oak rubs holes in the fingers and thumb very fast no matter what I do. When I worked in a lumber mill a long time ago some of the guys who tailed off the big re-saws had a mitten they wore made out of leather that must have been 1/4" thick. You couldn't bend the mitten but you didn't need to to do the job being done. They lasted indefinitely.
My question is, what do you guys wear for wood handling activities, not the initial cutting? What kind of goo do you put on your gloves to extend their life? It's either splinters from Madrone going right through the gloves or oak grinding holes in the palms and fingers and then grinding a hole in my hand.
 

U&A

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I like wool lined kinco from pig skin or deer skin. I use leather conditioner on them to keep them lasting longer.

Non lined for summer.

I also like splitting with the cheap harbor freight “mechanic’s glove” knock off. They slide down the axe handle nice. Don’t last long but for less than $4 i Dont care.

I absolutely hate the knit gloves that are dipped or whatever.


Sent while firmly grasping my Redline lubed Ram [emoji231]🛻
 
LoneOak

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Work Gloves

I use these gloves. The plywood mill I used to work for in Riddle, Or. provided these to the Green Chain pullers, they are a little stiff at first but they are very tough and comfortable. They will last months processing firewood!
 

Cody

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I like cowhide leathers for handling wood, especially splits. I like the nitrile dipped for running saws and when they wear out, they work as insulation under a pair of leathers if need be. Kinco cowhides to be specific. I do wear other gloves, usually because they're free but kinco's and nitrile's are my go to if I'm spending money on them.
 
calamari

calamari

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Work Gloves

I use these gloves. The plywood mill I used to work for in Riddle, Or. provided these to the Green Chain pullers, they are a little stiff at first but they are very tough and comfortable. They will last months processing firewood!
Thanks for the reply but there are no details about the glove you're talking about. I pulled dry chain a couple nights when they were short handed and used the mitts I described. No good for firewood work unfortunately. It was also almost 60 years ago so they probably aren't even available anymore.
It's funny that your mill provided gloves for their workers. When I worked in the mill it was before OSHA and we had to provide our own gloves or wear none at all and just deal with the splinters. The total safety equipment the mill provided was a box of assorted band aides and bandages in the office that was half empty and never refilled and bottles of salt tablets in a few places around the mill. About once a month you'd hear a guy scream and know he'd probably cut his finger off in a saw. I got my arm caught in a door jam finishing machine that sucked it in until the drive rollers wouldn't go any higher and then it sanded and applied a luxurious semi gloss finish to the top of my forearm.
 
calamari

calamari

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Thanks for the reply but there are no details about the glove you're talking about. I pulled dry chain a couple nights when they were short handed and used the mitts I described. No good for firewood work unfortunately. It was also almost 60 years ago so they probably aren't even available anymore.
It's funny that your mill provided gloves for their workers. When I worked in the mill it was before OSHA and we had to provide our own gloves or wear none at all and just deal with the splinters. The total safety equipment the mill provided was a box of assorted band aides and bandages in the office that was half empty and never refilled and bottles of salt tablets in a few places around the mill. About once a month you'd hear a guy scream and know he'd probably cut his finger off in a saw. I got my arm caught in a door jam finishing machine that sucked it in until the drive rollers wouldn't go any higher and then it sanded and applied a luxurious semi gloss finish to the top of my forearm.
I found your follow up. I was just too slow in my reply. Thanks. Those look good. It's going to be my Christmas present from family to me.
 
calamari

calamari

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Goostoff

Goostoff

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Gloves? We dont need no steenking gloves. I usually get the cheap goat skin work gloves from china mart. No gloves last for **** but I can usually get whole wood season out of a pair, but I only wear them when I am picking up wood out in the woods.
 
Sandhill Crane

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I worked in a place handling glass windshields. The thin cut proof gloves had a lot of dexterity and lasted forever. I think they are called X-treme. I bought something similar on line. They lasted half a summer, which I thought was pretty good. Twenty cord maybe at the splitter.
 
calamari

calamari

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Gloves? We dont need no steenking gloves. I usually get the cheap goat skin work gloves from china mart. No gloves last for **** but I can usually get whole wood season out of a pair, but I only wear them when I am picking up wood out in the woods.
Maybe I'm just overly sensitive from years of having moulding machines suck Doug Fir moulding back into the machine while I was holding onto it. When I quit the place it took a full year before I was able to get all the splinters out of my hands and have them heal where the wounds were invisible.
I'm going to "supposedly" get the pair I want for Christmas so until then I'll soldier on with worn out crap, a magnifying glass, a needle, and some tweezers.
 
calamari

calamari

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I worked in a place handling glass windshields. The thin cut proof gloves had a lot of dexterity and lasted forever. I think they are called X-treme. I bought something similar on line. They lasted half a summer, which I thought was pretty good. Twenty cord maybe at the splitter.
Thanks for the information.
In looking for info on this subject I came across really sophisticated cut resistant gloves and even a standard that is used to set a cut resistant standard. It involves putting increasing weight on what is in effect a straight razor being drug across the palm of the glove. Just the mental image of the test gave me the whim whams. I don't like knives!
 
calamari

calamari

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I have had good luck with Atlas work gloves for splitting and handing firewood. I am currently using there 300 series.
I've used those too and they were pretty good but I could tear them up on one big oak's cutting and splitting. I like how comfortable they were.
 
calamari

calamari

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Thanks to all who replied with their suggestions. I'm now at the mercy of Santa Claus to see what she thinks I need as opposed to any of the gift ideas I gave her that I got from these replies to my question. Then I have to camouflage what I subsequently buy for myself so they look sort of like what I was given. I'm sure others know what I mean.
 
CentaurG2

CentaurG2

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Atlas 300 gloves. Use the 300 for the warm months and the 451 thermals for the winter. Buy them by the dozen. You can wash them and just throw them out when they get too worn. You can also use a nitrile glove as a liner to make them waterproof. If you need dexterity, the atlas 380 are great for automotive.



Showa Atlas Gloves - Atlas Nitrile Gloves & More | PalmFlex
 

CUCV

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I've had good luck with Atlas gloves as well. Not sure why but I moved over to G&F 1528:
I wear them year round, The wife and kids take off with them before I wear them out.

For leather gloves Tilman 1414 is my choice, you can find pretty good price on them by the dozen on welding supply websites.
 

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