Best firewood handling gloves

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vizette

vizette

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I've found that I really like goatskin gloves. They're tough as can be but still have good dexterity. I got a pack of Wells Lamont Hydrahydes at Costco and was so happy with them I bought a second pack (3 pair per) for when I eventually wear these out, which I have yet to do. I have no affiliation and have never even heard of them until I saw them there. They grip great, are comfortable, and fit to the hand very well.
Up until then I was either using "disposables" (e.g. cheap gloves from H.F.) which the fingers always wear out in quickly as noted in previous posts, or the plain old tan cowhide gloves, which are kinda cumbersome and hot. I tried Mechanix gloves a couple times (for general work gloves) before going to H.F. but the fingers always wore through first thing on those too.
 
LoneOak

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I've found that I really like goatskin gloves. They're tough as can be but still have good dexterity. I got a pack of Wells Lamont Hydrahydes at Costco and was so happy with them I bought a second pack (3 pair per) for when I eventually wear these out, which I have yet to do. I have no affiliation and have never even heard of them until I saw them there. They grip great, are comfortable, and fit to the hand very well.
Up until then I was either using "disposables" (e.g. cheap gloves from H.F.) which the fingers always wear out in quickly as noted in previous posts, or the plain old tan cowhide gloves, which are kinda cumbersome and hot. I tried Mechanix gloves a couple times (for general work gloves) before going to H.F. but the fingers always wore through first thing on those too.
I use those when climbing trees for removal, A very nice glove indeed. But they just don't hold up to the razor sharp oaks and pecan out here. I had holes in the middle finger and thumb in less than 2 hours splitting and throwing.
 
calamari

calamari

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I use those when climbing trees for removal, A very nice glove indeed. But they just don't hold up to the razor sharp oaks and pecan out here. I had holes in the middle finger and thumb in less than 2 hours splitting and throwing.
It sounds like your wood is like ours. It's funny that those are always the two places that wear out when you're gripping with the whole hand. The reinforced gloves double cover the thumb and palm but miss the middle finger. I think I'm going to try to make that better by sticking it several times in Plasti-Dip when the glove's new.
 
Hermio

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The cheap work gloves I got for $4/pair at big box stores lasted about 45 minutes. According to ProjectFarm, Ironclad leather gloves are the best. In general, I buy gloves ranging from $15-25 per pair, with leather palm and fingers, and they last about a season. I will try the Ironclad gloves next.
 
unclemoustache

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First gloves are pretty cheap, and last longer than expected. Menards brand.
Second is pretty thick and better for cold weather. Mechanixwear.

Both of these have fantastic grip and fit the hand perfectly. (Well, my hand, at any rate.)

Of course, they do get a bit soggy inside, so they need to be changed/dried/washed every now and then.
It was annoying at first, but I'm used to it now. The grip is certainly worth it.

.
 
Cricket

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Was actually scrolling down to ask this very question - just found the first wear-through in a pair of Kinko I'd-say-what-type-but-they're-in-the-truck-and-I'm-to-beat-to-go-check style gloves after like three days use. Cow hide, at any rate. Beech bark looks defenseless but is apparently more vicious than it appears, and I paid $25 for those damn things.
 
MiserblOF

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I just use cheap leather gloves from Harbor Freight. They don't last long, but they're cheap. When they start to wear out a little duct tape extends their life. The left ones don't wear out so much and I use them and the backs of the worn out right ones for gussets under the staples I use to hold clear plastic sheeting over my stacks. The plastic lasts two years or more. I do have expensive 4x20 tarps that I hope will last longer, but not enough to cover all the stacks when I'm flushed with green wood.
 
turnkey4099
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I like cowhide leathers for handling wood, especially splits. I like the nitrile dipped for running saws and when they wear out, they work as insulation under a pair of leathers if need be. Kinco cowhides to be specific. I do wear other gloves, usually because they're free but kinco's and nitrile's are my go to if I'm spending money on them.
I tried the Nitrile gloves. I was sold on them right at the start, thin but protective, flexible enough to mount chains, bar nuts, etc and outlast any leather glove I have ever tried. I wear nothing else now for everything do do with 'wooding' and other outside occupations. Wear a hole in one finger? - a quick wrap with gorilla tape extends the life a bunch. At under $4 for 3 pair they are an amazing value. True, they are no protection in cold weather.
 
Whitespider
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A "best glove" thread is like a "best oil" thread... there is no "best", only opinion.

The reason for wearing gloves when working firewood is to protect the skin of your hands from the abuse... or the wear 'n' tear. All gloves will "wear out" handling firewood... and the rougher the bark, the faster the wear. I always used the cheapest, heavy leather work gloves that did not restrict finger movement and did not "slip" on my hands, while allowing a good grip. Good grip meant split leather rather than smooth leather... non-leather types typically allow splinters to penetrate the glove more often than leather.

Since none of us have identical hand/finger shape/dimensions... the gloves I like may be horrid for you. You'll just need to try different brands/types until you find what works for you.

However, I can give you tips to extend the life of your gloves.
Avoid "contaminating" your gloves with such things as gas and oil... such things will "soften" the leather and accelerate wear.
Carry more than one pair... if your gloves become saturated with moisture or sweat, change to a "dry" pair. Wet gloves wear faster... wet equals a "softened" surface.
Likely you will have one finger, on one glove, that wears through first every time (mine was always the middle finger of the right hand)... you can do a temporary patch with duct tape (or whatever), but the pair is shot. Toss both and move on... saving the other glove is a useless endeavor.
Worn gloves (those with the inevitable hole in one finger) are fantastic for saw maintenance (such as filing the chain)... but there's no point in having more than one pair for such things.
*
 
Bassmantweed

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Agree with the post above.
Different tool for different jobs.
When I’m running the splitter I use these.


When I’m swinging any type of axe I use these.


Note I’m. It sure is pay the $ for these but they were a gift and certainly high quality.
 
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