Can transplanted grown pepper plants survive?

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PA. Woodsman

PA. Woodsman

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Emmaus, Pennsylvania
We had a Cowhorn pepper plant that we bought months ago that said "sweet pepper" turn out to be so hot my wife couldn't stand it, obviously it was marked wrong, so I asked my neighbor if he liked hot peppers and he does, so I dug it up getting all of the roots and he put it in his garden in hopes that it will take and keep growing. Anyone know if this is possible?

Thank you
 

U&A

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Yes you can. You want to try and not disturb the roots. Try to dig up the soil around the plant and transplant the root ball with the plant. I have tried moving them indoors during the wither months. They survive for a time but they always seem to come down with aphids or powdery mildew.

Use an OMRI certified spray for the aphids and PM.

Or even a solution of 3% vegi oil water mix. Add a tiny bit of basic dish soap like dawn to help them mix.

Spray every other day when aphids are there. Once a week or so for maintenance. This will help with PM too.

This will kill soft body insects only and it is a contact killer so you got to get all of them. Aphids are born pregnant so when you see one you already have hundreds or more.


Sent while firmly grasping my Redline lubed Ram [emoji231]
 
CentaurG2

CentaurG2

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I use to use a product that I purchased at a local greenhouse. This was back in they day when I fooled around with magnolia plants. They would always come in from the summer loaded with scale. The product smelled like kerosene emulsified in soap. It worked great against anything. It would even put a shine on the leaves.
 

U&A

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I use to use a product that I purchased at a local greenhouse. This was back in they day when I fooled around with magnolia plants. They would always come in from the summer loaded with scale. The product smelled like kerosene emulsified in soap. It worked great against anything. It would even put a shine on the leaves.

Ut dis you put it on your sweet corn?[emoji848]


Sent while firmly grasping my Redline lubed Ram [emoji231]
 
CentaurG2

CentaurG2

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Ut dis you put it on your sweet corn?[emoji848]


Sent while firmly grasping my Redline lubed Ram [emoji231]
Nope, house plants only. This was back in the days before everything went crunchy granola. No pesticides or fertilizers here now. It’s like shoving sand against the tide. Waste of time but I guess everything needs to eat. The oddest thing about farming in New England is that it is different every year.
 
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Mad Professor
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North East USA
Yes you can. You want to try and not disturb the roots. Try to dig up the soil around the plant and transplant the root ball with the plant. I have tried moving them indoors during the wither months. They survive for a time but they always seem to come down with aphids or powdery mildew.
I've had pepper plants last 3-4 years bringing them inside winters. They get woody almost like trees.

I lost those one year as they were outside and we got a frost when I was not home.
 

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