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Chainsaw Bar worn out?

Huskybill

Huskybill

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I square the work table to the belt on my 1” belt sander and make the bar rails even again. Next I sharpen the chain and do the rakers. If we hit something on the right or left teeth the chain can cause a angle cut too.

From when the chains are new I count how many passes I make on each tooth. I do the same thing with the rakers.
 
Canyon Angler

Canyon Angler

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FWIW, usually when my saws start cutting in an arc, I find that the chain is dull, and sharpening the chain generally restores it to cutting straight.

I've never had to level or "square" the bar rails. (Not that they never get uneven -- only that it's never happened to me that I remember.)

Somewhere (in an owner's manual maybe) I read that "If your chain starts cutting in an arc, that usually means it needs sharpening."

For sharpening, I once bought a jig (Granberg), but hated it. A buddy recommended freehand filing, and I tried it, and never went back. It seems to work fine. I use a Stihl file handle that has the proper angle molded into the handle, which helps a lot on chains that (unlike Stihl chains) lack the lines embossed into the teeth that show you the proper angle.
 
old CB

old CB

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Decades of saw use, and I've never had a problem that could be traced to the bar. Not to say that it can't happen, but I've never seen it in almost 50 years. Of course I maintain my bars.

When a saw cuts a curve thru the wood, it's because the teeth on one side of the chain are doing their job correctly, and the other teeth are not. You may have hit stone, steel, or whatever that affected one side of cutters but not the other. Or, through repeated sharpening you may have shortened the cutters on one side more than the other.

Your chain is most likely at fault. Easy diagnosis--fit a new chain and see how it cuts. You'll know in an instant. If the new chain cuts right, you're good to go. If not, then you have a bar problem.
 
johnsayen

johnsayen

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Decades of saw use, and I've never had a problem that could be traced to the bar. Not to say that it can't happen, but I've never seen it in almost 50 years. Of course I maintain my bars.

When a saw cuts a curve thru the wood, it's because the teeth on one side of the chain are doing their job correctly, and the other teeth are not. You may have hit stone, steel, or whatever that affected one side of cutters but not the other. Or, through repeated sharpening you may have shortened the cutters on one side more than the other.

Your chain is most likely at fault. Easy diagnosis--fit a new chain and see how it cuts. You'll know in an instant. If the new chain cuts right, you're good to go. If not, then you have a bar problem.
This last paragraph is perfect advice.
 
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