Cost for sharpening saw chain

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chipper1

chipper1

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Hes cheap. It will make it one more round for him.
Like I said I wouldn't mess with it unless it's really helping out. Part of helping him out would be for him to see what's involved, I'd make him do it while I watched, well maybe as I don't know if I'd want him running my equipment :surprised3:, maybe a file:lol:. The lessons in life that cost us the most are those we are the slowest to forget, I was broke for many yrs:laughing:.

@pioneerguy600 could you please move this to the chainsaw forum :).
 
Mike Kunte

Mike Kunte

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Don't really want to trade, wouldn't let me post without a prefix. At any rate, I know this topic has come up before but it's something I'm in the process of doing right now..

For folks that sharpen chain for a little extra $ or to barter with, what's the charge? We all know the cost benefit of learning and sharpening them ourselves but in reality not everyone likes doing it and more importantly not everyone is good at doing it. Personally, I love sharpening chain bc I know how efficient they are when done correctly, being a fine art in many ways and I've never had a displeased customer.
"Local" shops (closest is a 3 hr drive) charge $10-14 per chain depending on length. I charge a flat rate of $9. With that, includes cleaning of chains, cutters sharpened, depth gauges set to proper tolerances and overall inspection of chain. I'll also break and make chains as needed but those are sold at more of a retail cost. I sharpen for locals, for friends and for tree care services. I realize that I could probably charge a bit more for everything I do with them but honestly when I can get 3-5 done an hr, the hourly rate is pretty good and I enjoy doing it

Cheers
AKTRrailDog!

If I did not grind my own chains, I would bring them to you! I take this exact approach. I can't stand dirty chains, and won't put them on my grinder. The only thing I do extra is to oil the chains once they've been ground, and then seal them in a plastic packet with a label on. I charge R1.40 per cutter, with a minimum charge of R50. That equates to around 9c US per cutter, and $3 per chain. Although this may seem cheap to you, it amounts to roughly 15% of the cost of a new chain. I can grind a well-looked-after chain 10+ times, so that gives a fair return. Most friends I don't charge.
I also enjoy doing it, and love seeing the customers' reactions when the chains outlast those done by the "professionals"! My best customer reports that his chains last 3x longer since he's been coming to me. That makes one feel good, and the extra cash helps me but new tools for the workshop!

Mike
 
Oldtoolsnewproblems

Oldtoolsnewproblems

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I am very happy with the quality I get from hand sharpening with the granberg jig, and since it has depth control, it is probably well suited for undoing uneven damage done by a bad sharpener
 
Mike Gudgeon

Mike Gudgeon

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My best customer reports that his chains last 3x longer since he's been coming to me.
That's pretty good, and the folks you sharpen for must be pretty good operators. There's nothing quite like having the careful work you do appreciated.
Not sure if times have just changed or whether it's just a currency thing but I would not even consider sharpening a chain for less than AU$25 at the VERY thinnest end, and, of course, the charge would go up from there according to the chain type, length, state of the chain, intended use and how valuable a customer I was dealing with.

If you value your own skill and know you can bring a chain back to as good - or better - than new, then you shouldn't sell your expertise short. If the customer doesn't know anything about sawchain or a decent sharpen they're not likely to be a good customer anyway.
 

sb47

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Biggest mistake I ever made was to have my chains "professionally" sharpened. I had 2 chains that were brand new and were needing there first sharpening. What I got back were 2 completely worn out pieces of junk. I only did it to see what a so called pro sharpening looked like. Never again.
I took a while to get the hang of it but it literally only takes five min to put a fresh edge on a chain that will rivel any brand new chain.
For me the key was to mount the saw in my vice so that I can get a good steady rest on a solid surface so I have good control of my work piece. That and a good quality file and file guide and to know when to stop cutting and not dull them to the point where it's a lot of work to bring back a good edge without spending a lot of time and work to bring a wrecked chain back shangri la.
 
Mike Gudgeon

Mike Gudgeon

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Biggest mistake I ever made was to have my chains "professionally" sharpened. I had 2 chains that were brand new and were needing there first sharpening. What I got back were 2 completely worn out pieces of junk. I only did it to see what a so called pro sharpening looked like. Never again.
I took a while to get the hang of it but it literally only takes five min to put a fresh edge on a chain that will rivel any brand new chain.
For me the key was to mount the saw in my vice so that I can get a good steady rest on a solid surface so I have good control of my work piece. That and a good quality file and file guide and to know when to stop cutting and not dull them to the point where it's a lot of work to bring back a good edge without spending a lot of time and work to bring a wrecked chain back shangri la.
Yep. A good hand-sharpen can undoubtedly be the best - and by a pretty good margin. Having a comfortable filing situation, REALLY good vision of the teeth, good gear and knowing exactly what you are doing are essential.
And count those strokes!
But all that said, if any way you're doing it works, it can't be bad. lolol
 
Philbert

Philbert

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Biggest mistake I ever made was to have my chains "professionally" sharpened.

People can claim anything. Just like there are people who claim to be “professional fallers“ (roofers, painters, etc).

Your guy s*cked. Does not mean that all sharpening services do.

Philbert
 
MontanaResident
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My dealer is $8.00 on or off the saw.
Other OEM shops I am hearing $10.00 plus

I tried to start a little chain sharpening service, and was asking $5 per chain. Nothing! I even have a guy that use to buy me a 6-pack for doing a couple of chains. I guess he wasn't happy with my work, as he is now back to buying a new chain every cord of wood he cuts. :crazy2: I swear he has about a 100 chains hanging off nails in his shop, all are very dull and almost brand new. When I started doing square hand filing, he got all excited, thinking this was going to be something he could do. He bought a file from me, and did a Giant flop. I think he said there was something wrong with the file, even though I did the first square filing for him, and then sold him the same file I had used.

Basically, unless you are a chainsaw fanatic, most people don't have a clue about how to maintain a chain, let alone the saw. $8 or $10 is doing them a favor. Maybe they will figure it out and learn to sharpen the chains themselves.
 
MontanaResident
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For me the key was to mount the saw in my vice so that I can get a good steady rest on a solid surface so I have good control of my work piece. That and a good quality file and file guide and to know when to stop cutting and not dull them to the point where it's a lot of work to bring back a good edge without spending a lot of time and work to bring a wrecked chain back shangri la.

My break thru was wearing a head lamp and reading glasses. You gots to see what you are doing to get a chain's cutters done right.
 
heimannm
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Dike, Iowa
I charge $0.10 per driver + $1.00 thus a 60 DL chain costs $7.00 and a 173 DL chain costs $18.30. No one complains about the pricing and many want an extra new chain while they are here. I always check the depth gauges and try to set them according to the saw and user.

Depending on the type of chain and the condition I may grind or file. I have many different types of file guides, both Windsor and Husqvarna roller guides, a good assortment of File-O-Plates, and 1/8 and 3/16" CBN wheels for the Carlton branded grinder.

If I stay at it, I can make it seem like I am earning $20/hour...

Mark
 

sb47

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People can claim anything. Just like there are people who claim to be “professional fallers“ (roofers, painters, etc).

Your guy s*cked. Does not mean that all sharpening services do.

Philbert
It was at a local saw shop that specialized in saws and saw repair. I have bought lots of saw components from that place and thought I'd give them a try with my chains.
When I first started doing my own chains I would get dull before I emptied the fuel tank. As I got better it would last a full tank before I had to sharpen. Now I can get 3 to 4 tanks before it need to freshen it up. Of course it all depends on the wood and if it has any debris in it. My tree guy brings me yard trees that he removes from residential trees. I have to pay close attention to metal objects like nails, I hooks, metal fencing, car parts, light fixtures, dog chains, barbed wire, and the like. Nothing worse and more disappointing/frustrating then to feel and hear the sound of hitting metal.
 

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