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CSM with table saw for resawing

FarmerLee

FarmerLee

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Sep 4, 2021
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Idaho
Hello all,

I am new here. I am interested in milling white fir into 1x boards for use as siding. I already have a table saw and a Stihl 661. I was thinking of getting a chainsaw mill to turn the fir logs into beams, and then resawing those beams into 1x6s on the table saw.

My thought was that this would be faster with less waste than doing all of the cuts with the CSM.

Has anyone used a table saw for resawing as an integral part of their lumber operation?

I know that I really should resaw on a bandsaw and that the table saw will limit me to a 6" cutting depth. I have neither the money nor the space for a bandsaw right now. Would love to hear thoughts on this harebrained idea!
 
Mad Professor

Mad Professor

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North East USA
Hello all,

I am new here. I am interested in milling white fir into 1x boards for use as siding. I already have a table saw and a Stihl 661. I was thinking of getting a chainsaw mill to turn the fir logs into beams, and then resawing those beams into 1x6s on the table saw.

My thought was that this would be faster with less waste than doing all of the cuts with the CSM.

Has anyone used a table saw for resawing as an integral part of their lumber operation?

I know that I really should resaw on a bandsaw and that the table saw will limit me to a 6" cutting depth. I have neither the money nor the space for a bandsaw right now. Would love to hear thoughts on this harebrained idea!
Logosol mill for you 661.

I've got an older M5 and love it

1 logosol.png
 

J D

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If the trees are a decent size I would say moving the beams through your table saw will be problematic. You will likely find what you gain by using a saw blade is offset by the extra cuts & overlaps that will be required to get the same coverage.
I went through the same process a while ago & ended up making 12" boards with an 18" 3/8 LoPro setup. While it worked alright if my trees were any bigger I'd either mill them with my standard setup, find someone with a bandsaw, or make slabs to sell & buy the timber I need.
If you can find someone local with a band mill you may find they have stuff that needs chainsaw milling & you can exchange services
 
HumBurner

HumBurner

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I've been wondering something similar.

Toying around with the idea of buying a used standalone or table top bandsaw to resaw some of the wood I'm going to mill. Even using a table saw is sounding more logical than using a chainsaw to break down cants into 2x and smaller boards. Spent hours searching a few forums and didn't come up with much in the success or failure departments.
 
HumBurner

HumBurner

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Ideally a large bandsaw mill is choice, but I’m referring to shop-sized standalone or tabletop sized bandsaws, often with a thin vertical blade.
 
SpacemanSpiff23

SpacemanSpiff23

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You might run into binding and pinching issues with that. Also Pushing a table saw blade through a 3" thick cut is going to be a lot of resistance. I would just keep milling with the chainsaw down to 1". A 6" wide cut with a 661 will most likely be way faster than doing it on a table saw. You could use the table saw to cut off the live edges afterwards though.

This is all just speculation. Try it on the table saw and see how it goes. I think you'll have better luck with the chainsaw.
 

J D

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After trying a few different things I decided to mill slabs at various thicknesses & then use a track saw to make dimensional timber.
I have also found milling one side of the log then rotating it 90° & milling slabs that then have a square edge works well as you can then use a skill saw with a fence to trim your boards. The nice thing about that is that you can flip the slab & cut from the other side without having to adjust anything
 
mehmetk

mehmetk

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It is a product that I find successful for cutting hedges and chopping them evenly. If you are considering a practical cut, It's an ideal product for your furniture. I use it for finer crafting. However, it will not overwhelm you in terms of its fee. You can turn to a more ideal product for a start. :)
 
Husky Man

Husky Man

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It is a product that I find successful for cutting hedges and chopping them evenly. If you are considering a practical cut, It's an ideal product for your furniture. I use it for finer crafting. However, it will not overwhelm you in terms of its fee. You can turn to a more ideal product for a start. :)
?????????

what product are you referring too??


Doug
 

Bmac

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I'm a woodworker that mills wood to support his hobby. So my focus is on producing high grade material to build my pieces with. I mill with a CSM and I purposefully mill thicker boards, usually 9/4 or 10/4 thick. Then I dry it and resaw with my shop bandsaw to the dimensions I need, works wonderfully and results in less waste.
If I were going to attempt to do what you are looking to do I would not use a table saw but rather a bandsaw.
 
HumBurner

HumBurner

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What brand/model do you use?

I've seen a lot of Craftsman and Wen for sale locally, but reviews online of those models are hit or miss, as they are often older.

Thanks
 

Bmac

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Delaware
I have a Laguna 1412, it's a nice saw and accurate.
I can resaw up to 14" thick with this. So on a project if I've using a 9/4 board, I can split this, resulting in two 1" thick bookmatched pieces.

I also have come to use the bandsaw whenever possible to break down my slabs prior to a project. My tablesaw is really only used for precision cuts or joinery cuts.
 
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