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Cut Resistant Gloves?

CacaoBoy

CacaoBoy

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Previous threads are pretty old, so I was looking for updated recommendations for cut resistant gloves.

I will be swinging a machete with the blade landing in close proximity to one hand and want to end each day with the same number of fingers I start. Good dexterity and being cool, breathable, and washable are pluses, but perhaps inconstant with protection. Any need for greater than cut resistance level 5?

Thanks for all comments and suggestions.
 
Philbert

Philbert

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Different styles of 'cut resistance' work in different ways. Chainsaw gloves have fibers to stall the saw motor. ANSI rated gloves are rated for sawing motions, including knives, and sharp edges of metal or glass. Neither of these are rated for chopping with a machete.

You may need some type of hard 'armor' to protect your other hand, if that is a risk.

Philbert
 
Be Stihl

Be Stihl

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I have to wear these at work so now they have followed me home for my firewood chores. They are pretty tough but not the best for being cool.
b32eadf92062750f809b49d39ac60eed.jpg



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stihl86

stihl86

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Probably the best thing you need is very good health insurance.
I've watched guys use a machete like a Japanese table chef.
The again, some I just walked away.
"Cut Resistant" wont help. Chainsaw gloves, as earlier, stated wont work either. (Same principal as chaps and you can get cut with chaps on. Just not in half))
Best safety equipment you'll need is concentration and a clear head.
 
ATpro

ATpro

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We used a chain glove in the market. They are level 9 and with a light glove liner comfortable to wear. Be sure to get the right size.
Stainless Steel Mesh Cut Resistant Chain Mail Gloves
Watch the video should give you the idea of what to look for.
You can buy them in other places that will tell you how to size them correctly.
they are not cheap so shop around.
The ones we use is U.S. Mesh and tagged with certification to be level 9 cut resistance. You wouldn't want to use these with power tools for safety reasons.
One time the girl from OSHA came in the Market and was going to write us up because my saw man wasn't wearing a cut glove when cutting on the saw. I explained to her that was the most dangerous thing you could do is wear any glove when using any of the power equipment except maybe the slicer. Then I showed her what would happened if the glove ever got into the saw. I told her to stand back and watch . I thru the glove into the saw blade and it grab it and it chewed the glove up, rolling it around and thru the saw blade off the wheels, I said think if your hand was in it. She videoed taped the whole thing and said she would show this to her supervisor. Needless to say we never had a problem with osha over a glove and power equipment again.
 
Okie294life

Okie294life

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I’m a safety nerd and I’ll tell you the best advice is to call Ansell directly and they will point you in the right direction, that’s pretty much all they make is gloves. We use a cut level 2 where I work for knives but I have used cut 4 around printing press doctor places, they are stiff as hell. The last post is correct kinda. You don’t want a chain glove getting caught in equipment and a cut glove won’t win the battle against a slicer....don’t ask me how I know. The best defense against machine blades is guarding and even restraint devices that keep people’s hands out of the danger zone.
 
David Henry

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Nocry cut-resistant gloves are my favorite ones. I've been using them for quite a long time and very happy with that purchase.
 
Philbert

Philbert

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This came up again in a chainsaw safety video hosted by a well know tree care supply company. The instructor was discussing chaps, PPE, etc., and mentioned that he even wears 'cut-resistant gloves' when handling saw chains, and was clearly wearing them while cutting with his chainsaw. I raised the issue, and he blew me off my stating something like, 'the safest thing is to never let your hand near the running chain.' (Duh!). I tried following up in an e-mail and he blew me off again.

To summarize:
'Chainsaw protective gloves' work like chaps - the protective fibers are designed to quickly and easily pull free from the glove and stall out the chainsaw, by jamming the bar groove, jamming the nose sprocket, jamming the drive sprocket, or a combination of those things.

'Cut-resistant gloves' for other applications (knives, sharp metal, glass edges, etc.) have cut-resistant fibers that are supposed to stay in place. If grabbed by a moving object, they are likely to pull the user's hand into the tool. This is such an issue that many manufacturing plants I have visited prohibit even thin, nitrile or latex 'exam-style gloves' around drill presses, lathes, etc.

Saw some sample warning notes on consumer versions of these gloves sold at a local hardware store today.

Screen shot 2021-06-13 at 10.35.59 PM.png
E33E060F-AA9D-4C57-B9C8-8E2C6034938D.png
Philbert
 
GeorgiaVol

GeorgiaVol

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I cannot imagine a glove that would have dexterity that you can still grip things yet wouldn't at least break a bone in your hand if you hit it with a machete.
But, if I'm wrong, I want to see these gloves.
 
unknwn

unknwn

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This came up again in a chainsaw safety video hosted by a well know tree care supply company. The instructor was discussing chaps, PPE, etc., and mentioned that he even wears 'cut-resistant gloves' when handling saw chains, and was clearly wearing them while cutting with his chainsaw. I raised the issue, and he blew me off my stating something like, 'the safest thing is to never let your hand near the running chain.' (Duh!). I tried following up in an e-mail and he blew me off again.

To summarize:
'Chainsaw protective gloves' work like chaps - the protective fibers are designed to quickly and easily pull free from the glove and stall out the chainsaw, by jamming the bar groove, jamming the nose sprocket, jamming the drive sprocket, or a combination of those things.

'Cut-resistant gloves' for other applications (knives, sharp metal, glass edges, etc.) have cut-resistant fibers that are supposed to stay in place. If grabbed by a moving object, they are likely to pull the user's hand into the tool. This is such an issue that many manufacturing plants I have visited prohibit even thin, nitrile or latex 'exam-style gloves' around drill presses, lathes, etc.

Saw some sample warning notes on consumer versions of these gloves sold at a local hardware store today.

View attachment 912172
View attachment 912247
Philbert
ANY sort of fabric around rotating machinery is a recipe for disaster. Ask me how I know. I have the absolute worst case of "disagreement with a tablesaw" and the resulting aftermath that you'll ever see. Don't do that !
 
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