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BuckBrewer

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I trying to clear some buck brush in a 1'-4' deep duck hole. Wanting to open the hole up a bit more. Trying to post a picture of what I'm talking about. I have Echo Timberwolf Chainsaw and I know that I can cut the depth of the bar to degree, but wanted to get a little deeper if possible to account for water fluctuating. I have an Echo SRM-410u brush cutter which has some power behind it. Anyone sacrificed a head potentially to use it to cut underwater and had any success. May not even be worth it, but desperate for ideas. Any better ideas would be appreciated.

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Bango Skank

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Too big to handle with some heavy duty loppers and a handsaw?

I got a couple nicer Silky saws that might work well, but if you want to save a couple bucks and are willing to go without full tang construction, the impulse hardened saws from Samurai are great too.
 

BuckBrewer

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Definitely could make some headway with the hand saws and loppers, but would be a long process with the amount of buckbrush I'm really talking about. Also, the diameter of the buck brush near the base can be fairly significant. Was curious mainly if someone has used a powerful brush cutter in such as fashion and if it was more trouble than it was worth?
 

Fatherwheels

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Definitely could make some headway with the hand saws and loppers, but would be a long process with the amount of buckbrush I'm really talking about. Also, the diameter of the buck brush near the base can be fairly significant. Was curious mainly if someone has used a powerful brush cutter in such as fashion and if it was more trouble than it was worth?
A good strong brush cutter will be perfect, keep an eye on it and be
prepared to rebuild the head when you suss something is up.

Air powered chainsaw, but you would need a compressor and a long hose.
Or one of those claws the emergency services use to cut open crashed vehicles.
 

JRM

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I trying to clear some buck brush in a 1'-4' deep duck hole. Wanting to open the hole up a bit more. Trying to post a picture of what I'm talking about. I have Echo Timberwolf Chainsaw and I know that I can cut the depth of the bar to degree, but wanted to get a little deeper if possible to account for water fluctuating. I have an Echo SRM-410u brush cutter which has some power behind it. Anyone sacrificed a head potentially to use it to cut underwater and had any success. May not even be worth it, but desperate for ideas. Any better ideas would be appreciated.

View attachment 1007769

Probably a stupid question, does the water drain throughout any specific time of year where you could go in and cut it easier?
 

Bango Skank

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I totally understand a little reluctance to choose hand tools over power tools, and since you already have the brush cutter, I’d lean towards that now too, but out of curiosity I want to ask, have you ever used a Japanese handsaw before? The first experience with one is usually pretty shocking. If you were nearby I’d loan you one.

My idea would suck in the deeper water though. Snorkeling with a handsaw I guess.


I’m not familiar with buckbrush at all. No way you’re ripping them out roots and all, either by hand, or with some mechanical advantage or winch? Wet submerged roots can be really loosely anchored, and maybe then they won’t be so prone to grow back quickly.
 

Sawdust Man

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We used to buck logs in the Columbia river when we were salvaging wood.... it works okay, but it's a very wet and messy proposition,.
The main thing when cutting under water is you need a saw with lots of torque, chain speed is pretty useless in the water, I think the echo 590 is actually probably a good choice for that application, cause those saws have good low end grunt.
If you are concerned about pollution, you may want to use canola oil for bar lube.
 

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