Fallen Branch Stuck On Both Ends - Help

SturgeonGeneral48

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You probably can't get any equipment close? I too like the pole saw idea if the branch is small enough. My typical plan for situations such as this is to hook it to my tractor winch, and use mismatched cuts to allow it to snap when tensioned. Seeing as your intending to clear a boat path, id actually do it in the summer when 1 end was free with the assistance of a tractor, skidder etc.

Note, if your doing this in the winter, be 100% positive that ice is think enough to support you & the tree.
Thanks Tigwelder. I don't have a tractor or skidsteer, just a F-150 that will be well clear of this mess when I start cutting. The ice is 100% safe. I wouldn't hesitate to drive my truck on the canal.

I took a saw out there by boat in summer and eyeballed the situation. I decided it was waaay to dangerous.
 

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I don't have a gas polesaw, only a 20V Black and Decker, but the branches going into the canal are less than 16" so I should be able to finish with the polesaw. I love the polesaw idea!

I'm not in a huge hurry, but I have a lot of help this weekend. I'll have 5 young dudes in their early 20's and 5 old doobers like me. We had a tornado take down some limbs this past summer and I asked a bunch of friends who use the property to help out splitting, sawing, and attacking the tree in the canal. So it's in the calendar for Saturday despite the fact it will be -7 in the morning. I was going to do some cutting from a boat, but realized that was crazy dangerous and never started the saw. Now I can stand on the ice and free this up,,, with a polesaw,,, from a safe distance,,, dressed warm :)
Don't forget you can rent a gas polesaw. The gas pole saw was also my first thought. The only other thing that might help is, remove everything you can before you cut any attachment point, and "set it free". Eliminate as much moving weight as possible.

You can also use throw lines or pole hook, pole saw, to get a rope tied around the limb at the top. Use the same method to get the rope over a limb higher up. Pull the rope with a come along, pickup truck, tractor, etc. Now you have control of the limb's weight. You can rope the bottom of the limb in the direction away from where you are standing - now you have control of the direction it "springs" when you cut it.

Understand? I had a job to remove a big storm damaged limb over a brand new fence. I got a rope on the top over another limb tied to the truck. Tied another rope pulling away from the tree and fence to a rope puller. tensioned both ropes. Cut the attachment point with a pole saw. Limb barely moved. Lowered to the ground slowly. Control is the thing when you're concerned about targets or safety.

Good luck.
 

SturgeonGeneral48

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Make sure you use winter grade bar oil or else at those temps your oil and dust will gum up the saw
Thanks Brufab! I didn't know about winter grade bar oil. I'll throw in a sawzaw.

Our situations are similar but I have a willow, the split is too high to reach, and I think my limbs are bigger. But same concept, yes. I'll also share my results after the weekend (assuming I live).
Don't forget you can rent a gas polesaw. The gas pole saw was also my first thought. The only other thing that might help is, remove everything you can before you cut any attachment point, and "set it free". Eliminate as much moving weight as possible.

You can also use throw lines or pole hook, pole saw, to get a rope tied around the limb at the top. Use the same method to get the rope over a limb higher up. Pull the rope with a come along, pickup truck, tractor, etc. Now you have control of the limb's weight. You can rope the bottom of the limb in the direction away from where you are standing - now you have control of the direction it "springs" when you cut it.

Understand? I had a job to remove a big storm damaged limb over a brand new fence. I got a rope on the top over another limb tied to the truck. Tied another rope pulling away from the tree and fence to a rope puller. tensioned both ropes. Cut the attachment point with a pole saw. Limb barely moved. Lowered to the ground slowly. Control is the thing when you're concerned about targets or safety.

Good luck.
Thanks Telecaster! My plan was to remove everything from the limbs and clear the whole area before tackling the 3 'big' limbs stuck in the ice. I will bring some straps, a come along, and some rope to try to control the limbs when they spring.
 

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It's just a downed limb, whether it's frozen in ice or wedged in the dirt, it's still just compression and tension, all the rules still apply
So simple.
What is the ground like where the tree is located. Is it soft or swampy can you get a truck back in there with a rope to pull on the limb. How long of a rope will you need. If the limb is out over the water can you reach the limb without getting into the water.
How high up is the limb. Can you reach it from the ground. Can you see from the picture how much holding wood is left where the branch broke.
 

SturgeonGeneral48

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So simple.
What is the ground like where the tree is located. Is it soft or swampy can you get a truck back in there with a rope to pull on the limb. How long of a rope will you need. If the limb is out over the water can you reach the limb without getting into the water.
How high up is the limb. Can you reach it from the ground. Can you see from the picture how much holding wood is left where the branch broke.
The tree is too big for me to tackle. It's a willow that is probably 4' in diameter. The limb that snapped and fell in the water is probably 2.5' in diameter with a good 10" still attached to the tree. That limb snapped 15' up in the air so I can't get to it. I am just going to attack it from the ground to get as much out as possible. I'm pretty sure it won't break free from the tree in this process, but I will definitely keep an eye on that.
 

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The tree is too big for me to tackle. It's a willow that is probably 4' in diameter. The limb that snapped and fell in the water is probably 2.5' in diameter with a good 10" still attached to the tree. That limb snapped 15' up in the air so I can't get to it. I am just going to attack it from the ground to get as much out as possible. I'm pretty sure it won't break free from the tree in this process, but I will definitely keep an eye on that.
Tell it to thejollylogger he is the one that thinks it is so simple.

It sounds a lot more difficult than what can be seen from the picture is all I was pointing out. Thanks for answering those questions.
 

SturgeonGeneral48

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Do you have to get the limbs stuck in the ice now, or could you just tie a rope around them and leave that accessible to drag them out after it melts?
The limbs are frozen in 2' of ice and won't go anywhere until spring. I'll probably rope them to drag them in spring, but my biggest concern is the saw work.
 

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Tell it to thejollylogger he is the one that thinks it is so simple.

It sounds a lot more difficult than what can be seen from the picture is all I was pointing out. Thanks for answering those questions.
I guess you missed the part where the canal is frozen solid. It is simple, it just takes practice. For any pro, that is about a 10 minute job. Unfortunately, those are skills that can't be taught on the internet, so these tend to turn into Rube Goldberg excercises.
 

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I guess you missed the part where the canal is frozen solid. It is simple, it just takes practice. For any pro, that is about a 10 minute job. Unfortunately, those are skills that can't be taught on the internet, so these tend to turn into Rube Goldberg excercises.
Well there you go.
You are the pro so maybe you could give more detail on how you would go about this.
That is what the OP is asking for. Also explain it in a way so that the OP can get it done in only 10 minutes.
let me guess Put in the Gas and Oil.
 

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Well there you go.
You are the pro so maybe you could give more detail on how you would go about this.
That is what the OP is asking for. Also explain it in a way so that the OP can get it done in only 10 minutes.
let me guess Put in the Gas and Oil.
You're missing the point. The OP could get it done in 10 minutes 10 years from now. All he needs to do is clean up 3 hurricanes, a couple Forest fires, the odd windstorm and blizzard, here and there... you can't learn how to do a job like that the "easy" way over the internet, because it takes a few thousand trees to develop the skills to do it. Every tree and situation is different, and it just takes experience to be able to feel the wood as it reacts. Would I cut the left limb before the right? The back before the front? Or just leave the tripod in the ice and cut the main limb free? Are there some side loads not apparent from the picture? No clue. I just know it would take about minutes to assess the situation and 5 minutes of cutting to resolve the situation... but honestly not using techniques I would recommend to the OP considering his skillset.
 

SturgeonGeneral48

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OP here. I realize I'm not going to become an expert by reading online advice. The thread has already been useful as I am now planning on finishing the cuts with a polesaw, tying off limbs that may spring free, and finding some winter blend bar oil. This will be a 2-3 hour job for me as I am likely to get my bar stuck and will be painfully careful since I don't have experience with situations like this. More time to enjoy the crisp winter air!

I appreciate everyone's input.

Thanks
 

TheJollyLogger

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OP here. I realize I'm not going to become an expert by reading online advice. The thread has already been useful as I am now planning on finishing the cuts with a polesaw, tying off limbs that may spring free, and finding some winter blend bar oil. This will be a 2-3 hour job for me as I am likely to get my bar stuck and will be painfully careful since I don't have experience with situations like this. More time to enjoy the crisp winter air!

I appreciate everyone's input.

Thanks
You'll be fine, just go nice and slow, and be flexible with your plan. My biggest concern is your footing on the ice. What about a couple bags of sand?
 

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You're missing the point. The OP could get it done in 10 minutes 10 years from now. All he needs to do is clean up 3 hurricanes, a couple Forest fires, the odd windstorm and blizzard, here and there... you can't learn how to do a job like that the "easy" way over the internet, because it takes a few thousand trees to develop the skills to do it. Every tree and situation is different, and it just takes experience to be able to feel the wood as it reacts. Would I cut the left limb before the right? The back before the front? Or just leave the tripod in the ice and cut the main limb free? Are there some side loads not apparent from the picture? No clue. I just know it would take about minutes to assess the situation and 5 minutes of cutting to resolve the situation... but honestly not using techniques I would recommend to the OP considering his skillset.
Ok I get it. You really do not have any advice to give to the OP because you do not think he is capable to handle the job. Well thanks for your contribution to this thread after all you are the Pro. Don't forget the Gas and Oil.
 

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Ok I get it. You really do not have any advice to give to the OP because you do not think he is capable to handle the job. Well thanks for your contribution to this thread after all you are the Pro. Don't forget the Gas and Oil.
I've been giving him advice all along, read the whole thread. You're the one that chimed in and said you wouldn't know where to start. I merely took you at your word... every job starts with gas and oil.
 

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Many ideas but; How long has it been in the water? A live limb should grow to acclimate and relieve the strain/tension some if not all. the small limbs are in the water/ice they "Should" not be creating much stress/tension but still be watching for it. Like previously mentioned clean up all of the bramble leaving only the potential problem limbs in the ice. Then cut the ones less accessible like under or in an unsafe area. Leave the ones in the ice sticking up a lot. The last limb get a chain or ratchet ((Heavy duty) and secure the last one to be cut to one of the limbs protruding from the ice or back to the tree trunk. (cable come a long might be an option). Put a pope on the chain/strap before cutting in case there is tension you can retrieve it in the summer. Make several careful partial cuts every few (or more) inches on your last limb holding and watch where/if tension is there NEVER stand in the potential kick zone. Several partial cuts will take some of the energy out of the tension a little at a time and allow you to gage which way the preload/tension is (If any. How much there is )You will see the cut open a bit but if you see this stop and make another partial cut and so on if it tries to pinch in the cut you guessed it wrong and if it is on the bottom it isn't real tension but compression presumably from gravity. If you Opt to use a sheet of plywood several screws will act as ice studs to keep the sheet in place. Sawing while on Ice Is the real DANGER You need to be on guard for (slipping with a running chainsaw)
Good Luck and work SAFE
 

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I have cut a lot of leaning trees hung up on other trees but never one with water involved.
Without being there and seeing everything firsthand I would not know where to start.
I've been giving him advice all along, read the whole thread. You're the one that chimed in and said you wouldn't know where to start. I merely took you at your word... every job starts with gas and oil.
I said without being there to see everything firsthand I would not know where to start.
I have all the equipment and know how to handle the job at hand.
You were the one being a smart ass. End of conversation.
 
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