Getting logs from the ground to the trailer?

sean donato

sean donato

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It's manageable issues. Not terribly hard to get them unbound out in the field. The sun wear had been my primary concern with the synthetic rope. Changed over about 2 years ago. Keep the old cable on the truck just in case.
 
djones

djones

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Have you considered mounting an engine lift on your trailer. You might find a used one fairly cheap. Cutting your logs down to a manageable size before putting them on your trailer will help also.
 
rwoods

rwoods

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I decided to go to synthetic winch ropes last year for their obvious advantages. But have already found two potential drawbacks:
1) The rope flattens permanently under heavy load.
2) If you use the winch with the rope not tightly wound - the rope will bury itself under previous coils and be unusable until you get back home and have "resources to unbury" it. This observation is made assuming that one used the winch because they were stuck.

Right now I think synthetic may not be all it is cracked up to be. Sunlight degrades it as well. My Warn steel winch cable still looks and works great after 22 years.

* Of course one should keep the coils tightly wound. But when stuck in a swamp it may be possible to engage in imperfect behaviors.
I recently decided to try synthetic for two reasons:
First this happen last month with my HF winch line that I use as an extension:
IMG_6261.JPG
Smooth hook almost sliced through the line high in a large tree and I couldn't find a close source for replacement domestic line. And second, Tuff Stuff had their winch ropes on clearance.

I was concerned about UV, mud and trash when not in use so I made a removable flap to cover it.
IMG_6370.JPG

I have only used it once and loved the lightness, no broken strands to slice your hand and the fact it stays put on the drum while freewheeling unlike my steel cable. I dislike how slippery it is on the drum so I went with 6 wraps instead of 3. I got ahead of things and ordered their 85' "3/4 inch" line (more like 5/8") thinking I would go with a larger capacity winch which I didn't. I quickly discovered that this size rope barely fits within the winch confines so I ordered 100' of the "1/2 inch" size and now have plenty of room. Last night I made a loop in the larger rope so I now have a winch line extension that won't fight me. I still need a suitable block or two. More $$$.

85' of "3/4 inch" line. Rope is against the supports.
IMG_6361.JPG

100' of "1/2 inch" line. Over an inch of clearance.
IMG_6369.JPG

Both ropes were wound under tension. I hope they both work out to be worth the money.

I have had steel cable take the "dive" as well with no way to break it free other than jerking it with a machine. Fortunately, I seldom use the winch for self-recovery and I stay out of swamps. Carefully rewinding at the end of the day under tension seems to be my best preventative measure to bird nesting and dives. I expect the same with the rope.

Ron
 
djones

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Have you considered mounting an engine lift on your trailer. You might find a used one fairly cheap. Cutting your logs down to a manageable size before putting them on your trailer will help also.
 
rwoods

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Practice is actually recommended for utility tractors with heavy loader use. But there is no fun in saying that. Ron
 
Ted Jenkins

Ted Jenkins

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One of my very early attempts at backyard log arch, trailer unloading. At least my kids got to laugh….View attachment 913961
Very clearly a Bassackwards effort and a good chuckle. With out some attempts at the process an OP will not have a clue at any thing. I could spend some time telling folks about the time I managed to lift the back of my Bronco off the ground. With some cable or good rope one can move heavy objects around pretty easy. In order to multiply force one will need some sheaves or snatch blocks. The use of a garden tractor and some snatch blocks can move a 10,000 lb log easy. However one must have some basic trigonometry and math skills to do it well. The arch certainly has its place when all else fails. Using small limbs as rollers under any log makes moving must faster. A sizeable hanging limb can be used to lift loads on to trailers. Medium sized rounds can be used as ramps to coax log on to trailers. Most people roll the logs side ways with the sides removed. Thanks
 
unclemoustache

unclemoustache

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I made a log arch. Worked great until I overloaded it and bent it.
bought a seriously over made one. I can barely lift the darn thing, so I don’t use it.
Now I use my capstan winch to simply pull the logs straight unto the trailer. I have a small ramp that fits on the back for them to slide up. I don’t think I’ll go back to an arch again, but there’s nothing wrong with that method.
To each his own.
 
scor440tk

scor440tk

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In line for a hydraulic bandsaw mill now. But I need to get about 70 big logs from a couple gently sloped mountain acres to my 5 acre lot. Some are about 24" at the base.

Until I can get a tractor with log grapple I will have to use a 20' landscape trailer with 12" sides. Winching them seems the way to go at the moment.

Better technique? I am not made out of money. Rather not rent a skid steer. For one thing that means over 100 miles of driving.
Log arch
 
scor440tk

scor440tk

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In line for a hydraulic bandsaw mill now. But I need to get about 70 big logs from a couple gently sloped mountain acres to my 5 acre lot. Some are about 24" at the base.

Until I can get a tractor with log grapple I will have to use a 20' landscape trailer with 12" sides. Winching them seems the way to go at the moment.

Better technique? I am not made out of money. Rather not rent a skid steer. For one thing that means over 100 miles of driving.
 
Ted Jenkins

Ted Jenkins

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I live near some lakes so boat trailer stuff is pretty common. Many trailer have quite large rollers which when mounted on a ramp or near the back of a trailer they can be a big asset. I have even loaded logs with a come a long but it is a lengthy process. Thanks
 

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