How I exactly sharpen chains

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Huskybill

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I tried all ways of doing it, here’s my best results. The first time takes time to make it exactly correct. Even with new chains I sharpen them.

Example 3/8” chain,

1. Take the 7/32” round file by itself. If it doesn’t fit in the new chain go the next size smaller. Open up the gullet so the radious goes to the top of the link do not file into the link. The gullet should be a nice round radious with room for the chip to curl and exhaust. Remember this is under the cutting edge. Make the same amount of passes on each gullet.

2. Using the file n guide I use a smaller round file that sharpens the upper cutting edge only. Even. a 5/32, 11/32”, 3/16” what ever is close. Using the angle guide marks on the file n guide make the same amount of passes on each tooth. If the chain is in good shape one, two or three passes with the file n guide will do.

3. Next is the rakers. Set the rakers to .030” to .040” depending on the size of the cc’s of the saw. Smaller saw stay smaller, even .025”. Again make the same amount of passes on each raker.

The first time takes time then it’s only the file n guide after. Them as the chain wears hit the rakers when it’s saw dust. Trust me try it, it works,

Next go up one size on your rim on the drum. If your running 7 t rim go to 8 t rim. Speed the chain up. Don’t push the saw let it cut on its own.
 

Huskybill

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Trust me any saw sharpened this way kicks butt, on the smaller sized chain go to smaller files. No one could keep up with me in the woods. My husky 266se and 2100cd kicked butt. Time is money.

I had fellow cutters buy husky saws because they couldn’t keep up I never showed them my sharpening technique. The chip curls and exhausts it doesn’t bind in the gullet.

You can do the gullet with a 3/16” file by itself down to the top of the link then use the 5/32” in the file n guide on the upper edge.
 

Philbert

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I will summarize this:

1. Use the correct size file
2. File til sharp
3. Lower rakers if needed.

A-hem.... Nothing to see here.
My 'Axiom #4' of chain sharpening: 'Know what what you want your cutters to look like when sharp.'

In other words, you can file or grind a chain and not make it sharper. You can use any file, jig, fixture, or method you want. But you have to know what you are trying to achieve. I don't care if your finished chains look different than mine, if that is what you are trying to achieve. In other words, sharpen with 'intent'.

Philbert
 
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My 'Axiom #4' of chain sharpening: 'Know what what you want your cutters to look like when sharp.'

In other words, you can file or grind a chain and not make it sharper. You can use any file, jig, fixture, or method you want. But you have to know what you are trying to achieve. I don't care if your finished chains look different than mine, if that is what you are trying to achieve. In other words, sharpen with 'intent'.

Philbert

Yup. Took me a few years to learn this. I had to use a bench grinder Oregon clone for a few years. I figured that was the ONLY way to get a uniform sharp chain. Then one day, I again tried filing by hand and viola. Biggest break thru #1 was in wearing reading glasses and a head lamp. Gots to see what you are doing to get it to look like you want it. #2 was in understanding that the rakers are to be set per cutter. Didn't matter that the one or more cutters were different then the others, or that they are ALL different from each other. Set the rakers depth to the cutter it precedes, and the chain will cut good and cut straight. #3 is file often. Takes minutes to put a fresh edge on a chain. Ignore, abuse, put it off and it can take a few or more minutes per cutter to restore the chain properly.
 

Philbert

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making sure you can see what you’re doing.

Good lighting helps. A fundamental problem is that we are usually filing/ grinding on the underside of each cutter. I have used a small mirror to help inspect the edges. Some race chain guys file in fixtures which hold the cutters in a position like rounding the nose of a guide bar, and provides more visibility.

I was surprised that there was not more discussion about the way that this fixture supports the cutters for filing: tilted back so the user can see the progress as they file:

Philbert
 
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Yup. Took me a few years to learn this. I had to use a bench grinder Oregon clone for a few years. I figured that was the ONLY way to get a uniform sharp chain. Then one day, I again tried filing by hand and viola. Biggest break thru #1 was in wearing reading glasses and a head lamp. Gots to see what you are doing to get it to look like you want it. #2 was in understanding that the rakers are to be set per cutter. Didn't matter that the one or more cutters were different then the others, or that they are ALL different from each other. Set the rakers depth to the cutter it precedes, and the chain will cut good and cut straight. #3 is file often. Takes minutes to put a fresh edge on a chain. Ignore, abuse, put it off and it can take a few or more minutes per cutter to restore the chain properly.
I started with an old Tecomec Oregon 510 clone. Prior to that tried a hand filing and my results always sucked. Then I started logging and with some tips from a mentor got pretty decent at hand filing. The key for me was not letting my file get to deep, setting the rakers properly and keeping the gullets cleaned out.
The process the OP uses is very similar to what I do.
 

huskihl

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On the fast/hooky side of std
View attachment 942647

lots of hook, fast grabby play chis
View attachment 942648
Durable View attachment 942649
Durable

View attachment 942650


A little delicate on the point
View attachment 942652




1/4” dia file
View attachment 942651
1/4” file on 3/8”View attachment 942654


average/normal/std
View attachment 942653

1/4” dia File on 3/8” chain
View attachment 942655
1/4” again
View attachment 942656
Those last 4 are what I try to make mine look like. Nice job, Dave
 

davidwyby

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Those last 4 are what I try to make mine look like. Nice job, Dave
All just a bunch of random pics I’d saved. Half mine and half other people’s. The ones you like is all 1/4” I think. I had a thread about it. Pretty stupid simple…could just use a progressively smaller file as it wears and maintain the same “gullet height”.
 

huskihl

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All just a bunch of random pics I’d saved. Half mine and half other people’s. The ones you like is all 1/4” I think. I had a thread about it. Pretty stupid simple…could just use a progressively smaller file as it wears and maintain the same “gullet height”.
I’ve often wondered why a larger file wasn’t recommended, since you can’t get the top of the cutter and the gullet in a single pass with the proper one
 

Huskybill

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On the fast/hooky side of std
View attachment 942647

lots of hook, fast grabby play chis
View attachment 942648
Durable View attachment 942649
Durable is close go deeper into the gullet make it a radious then touch the upper cutting edge with the smaller file n guide setup.

View attachment 942650


A little delicate on the point
View attachment 942652




1/4” dia file
View attachment 942651
1/4” file on 3/8”View attachment 942654


average/normal/std
View attachment 942653

1/4” dia File on 3/8” chain
View attachment 942655
1/4” again
View attachment 942656
 

GoBigRed

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Video or i call BS
Just watch a Buckin Billy Ray video on YouTube. He posts a video on filing about every six months.
It makes sense and this is how fallers out here would sharpen. A grind cuts amazing, but when your deep in the woods, starting the day at the bottom of the valleys, and time is money, it’s kind of hard to grind. So, chains would all get filed with this method to be prepped for quick touch ups in the woods.
It’s awesome to see the old tried and true methods getting taught, posted, and communicated. Everyone wants to reinvent the wheel, but in a lot of cases, folks figured out the best way of doing things a long time ago. But corporate America can’t make money unless they keep “improving” and selling.
Keep spreading the knowledge. 👍🏻
 
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