How often are you sharpening//replacing chains on your climbsaws?

eye.heart.trees

eye.heart.trees

arborjunky
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Jun 25, 2019
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Tampa-Area
I think that when I bought my saws I focused on the wrong thing, namely a focus on the powerheads w/o a focus on "Perpetually-sharp chains", whether accomplished by buying chain in-bulk and making my own, or investing in some expensive machinery that'd quickly&easily sharpen a chain for me (IE Oregon's unit...if it's not quick&simple, it just won't get done...I don't mind sharpening that much, but just cannot keep-up with it, I'd sharpen mid-job if time were never an issue!!)

Have found that I'll (significantly) prefer my 25cc with new chain to my 36cc with two-job's-use chain, the degradation is just so fast..... I do wonder how much of this is due to cheap chains, as I simply buy Walmart 2-packs and replace chains instead of sharpening (usually), but then think back to how when I had only Oregons it didn't seem that different..

Very curious people's thoughts on how to "keep sharp" or be efficient here, I mean I far better with my lil 25cc climbsaw than my bulky 36cc, and but go for the latter if I've already got an hours'-use on the former....it's like the cutter teeth's state is far more important than the power of the saw itself, but that the cutter-teeth are such that they simply can't get much usage before they're dulled.

Thanks for any insight, am buying these $15-20 2-packs from walmart way too often (though still feels "more efficient" than when I was sharpening & lowering rakers on my Oregon 91's chains), wish I had a good idea here -- have climbed with/for nearly a dozen other companies (am new to "being solo" the way I am now) and never saw a good solution (IE I've seen plenty of dog-**** 194T's because of dull chains, never saw someone sharpening on-site, heard-of sharpening machinery, or seen a reel of chain in real life)

Thanks again for any help/insight here!
 
eye.heart.trees

eye.heart.trees

arborjunky
Joined
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Tampa-Area
I should mention some specs:

- when I did sharpen, I'd go for 35/40deg IE a "duller, but longer-lasting, cutter angle"

- I do not use my climbsaws on the ground or near soil, and keep sheaths on them in-canopy when not using them

- have never ever gone and bought a pro chain (the chain that came w/ my 355t is the only pro chain, if it even was, I never use that b&c)

I do wonder about the carbide-type chains (like, the type they'd use on firemens' chainsaws)
 
KarlD

KarlD

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I can easily run my th saw all day in oak or beech and it’s still ‘decent’ at the end of the day.
When the groundies are cleaning up is when I tend to resharpen for the next day; often only 3 or 4 strokes needed.
I’ve never come across anyone sheathing their saw up a tree, interesting.
I only use Stihl chains; with correct use and sharpening a chain can last me months..but then I do rotate saws quite a lot
 

J D

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You're looking at it the wrong way... if you sharpen a little, & often, you will be cutting quicker & safer. Add to that the saw won't be working as hard & your bar & chain will wear less & last longer.
Once a chain has started to dull, it will dull incrementally more with continued use resulting in a lot of sharpening being required. What kind of chain are you using? Full chisel is worse than semi for this.
I'll (significantly) prefer my 25cc with new chain to my 36cc with two-job's-use chain
Yup, a decently sharpened chain often makes more difference than more cc's... & a well sharpened chain will perform even better than a new one.
when I did sharpen, I'd go for 35/40deg IE a "duller, but longer-lasting, cutter angle"
How were you achieving your flatter angle? The right cutting angle for the wood you are cutting will make a big difference to self feeding & to a lesser degree self sharpening.
Got to get the rakers right too!
 
lohan808

lohan808

Powersaw addict
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JD has a good point. Sharpening gently and frequently will give much better chain times. Buying cheap chains seems like a waste of money over time. Yeah I agree sharpening after a beater of a day is a beotch, but when you look at the time savings at the job site or project the numbers add up. Good luck. I would reconsider the expenditure on pro chains. Even though they are pricey, The Stihl Rapid Super is an excellent choice, high quality and durable..
 

J D

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If you've got a few chains why not get a cheap grinder & learn how to use it... Swap chains instead of sharpening & run em through the grinder at the end of the day
 
Franny K

Franny K

xyz
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North eastern Ct USA
For a 25cc saw if you are using 3/8lp 0.043. The Stihl pmm3 should be tried. I have found one place buy 2 get 3. I never get the nose properties of new. Should go farther than what you describe. If you like Walmart check out the chain online, it is sort of like eBay.
 
LoneOak

LoneOak

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I get about 3 - 4 Red Oak removals before having to sharpen the chain. And if its not a monster I can do a Live Oak or a Pecan removal on one chain. I'm using Oregon 91VXL, I use an Oregon 511a grinder, my angles are 90* 25* 55* and set rakers to .025
 
TheJollyLogger

TheJollyLogger

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I touch them up at the first sign of sawdust. Just like a knife it is easier to keep them sharp than have to try and reestablish an edge. Stihl chain is worth the money, way cheaper in the long run.

I consider chain sharpening and saw maintenance to be an essential skill, just like climbing and rigging skills. I freehand with good results, but the stihl file guide is the best I've seen as far as speed and accurate results for novice filer.
 
EchoRomeoCharlie

EchoRomeoCharlie

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I hit them with the file after every day of cutting. Most of the time they don't need much, but that little bit helps. Then you never have the problem of being up in the tree and wondering why the damn thing won't cut.

You really take a scabbard up in the tree with you and put it on when you're not running the saw? If I'm not going to be running a saw for a significant period of time because I'm moving a bunch of rigging or something, I just lower the saw down to the ground so it's not in my way. I've never actually put a scabbard on the saw in the tree.
 

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