Husky 346 rebuild problem for a newbie...

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tkshrout

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I used old metering lever.
I did not use compressed air, but did spray with carb cleaner.
I don't have the ability to pressure test crankcase.

I'm looking towards the carb because when it shuts down the plug is coated with gas, definitely getting too much.

What would "cleaning seal" look like? sanding them flat?

Just want to get this saw up and going. If carb is most likely any recommendations on replacement thats not 70$?
 

J D

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Just make sure the mating surfaces are clean & will seal on the gasket as well as possible... If they're flat then fine sandpaper on a flat surface or a flat blade/scraper works well
 
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Slowwwwww down. I know the feeling of being eager, but your carb may be perfectly fine. $70 is way better spent on a mityvac and not another carb that may be fine.

Firstly, make sure you know what you’re doing with your screws. Tuning was such a confusing topic for me just a couple years ago, that I set out to make a video that you literally can’t get wrong.

Listen to the sounds and process…

regarding smoking on start up of a new engine, yeah don’t worry about that.

a slight leak out of the atmospheric drilling in the carb is totally fine too, the gaskets will leak a bit very slowly until fuel has soaked them and they have fully compressed.

Here I am fogging out the mozzies -

2B6BD3AA-5552-4C20-ABB2-13A5EDFF2411.jpeg

And see if this video I made helps you out at all. Take a video of your saw too, it will help people here in directing you - what you think you hear and what you’re actually hearing can be two different things

 

Mike Gudgeon

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Complete carbs are unbelievably cheap these days. Throw one on without even touching the screws and see what happens. There shouldn't be lots of fuel in there and it can only get in there through the carb (unless there's something REALLY weird going on), so if the carb is metering half decently there will be no flooding - at least not like you have mentioned.
Also, you might want to re-check your fuel/oil ratio. Maybe what you think is flooding is heaps of oil from the mix? Unlikely but possibe.

You probably know, but if and when you DO get around to adjust the screws on the new carb;
'All the way in' is clockwise until you can screw no more BUT GENTLY. If you seat them too hard you will damage the carb irrepairably (is that a real word?). There are other cases where 'all the way in 'til you can screw no more' is helpful, but I'd best not go there.

I fully agree with a. palmer jr. about being sparing with the oil when you do a build. The rings and little end are where it's really needed for this situation.

The good news is that the things runs! Yay! Sorting the fueling is an inconvenience but IT RUNS! WooHoo!
 

tkshrout

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Ok, so I tried the steps in vintage's video (nice video by the way). Things seemed to be going good, but after adjusting for awhile (5 minutes), saw began to just cut out when I hit throttle.

In the beginning it throttled up fine. Then it got to the point where throttle cut it out. Got it restarted once, idled and then died on throttle again. Was fully flooded after second instance of this happening- wet spark plug, wouldn't restart even with open throttle pulling on cord.

I'm torn- could it be something with the saw getting warmed that I could throttle when its only been running for a few minutes, but then will compeltely die on throttle a bit later?

Again- this is new oem P+C, i replaced the intake boot clamp for the metal type... I don't have the ability to vac test the cylinder.

Should I try a new carb?

Thanks again for the assistance!
 

tkshrout

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Ok, so I tried the steps in vintage's video (nice video by the way). Things seemed to be going good, but after adjusting for awhile (5 minutes), saw began to just cut out when I hit throttle.

In the beginning it throttled up fine. Then it got to the point where throttle cut it out. Got it restarted once, idled and then died on throttle again. Was fully flooded after second instance of this happening- wet spark plug, wouldn't restart even with open throttle pulling on cord.

I'm torn- could it be something with the saw getting warmed that I could throttle when its only been running for a few minutes, but then will compeltely die on throttle a bit later?

Again- this is new oem P+C, i replaced the intake boot clamp for the metal type... I don't have the ability to vac test the cylinder.

Should I try a new carb?

Thanks again for the assistance!
The original smoke while running has cleared up btw- seems like it was probably the oil I used when assembling.
 

J D

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You've probably just got one a bit too far out... Set them both back to 1 turn out & start again (make a note of how many turns out you had adjusted them to for future reference).
If you have an air leak tuning will be problematic
 

tkshrout

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if the metering lever (correct term?) was too high or too low would that cause this? which would cause it to flood out? Too high or too low?
 

Mike Gudgeon

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if the metering lever (correct term?) was too high or too low would that cause this? which would cause it to flood out? Too high or too low?
I agree with Clyde. yes it could.
It's also worth checking that old lever for wear if you haven't already done so.
 
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It’s laste for an update… BUT a new am carb fixed everything up. Seem like I botched the carb rebuild somehow. Kept the old carb to maybe revive some day but it’s running now regardless!
Some guys around here will slap a kit in one without cleaning the carb thoroughly and call it rebuilt..
 

Mike Gudgeon

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if the metering lever (correct term?) was too high or too low would that cause this? which would cause it to flood out? Too high or too low?
Yes it could. You also mentioned using an old one. Not a good thing to do. The get very visible wear and it is best to replace them.
You seem to be well and truly on the home run now but I'm wondering whether all that smoking may have been caused by fuel or oil having accumulated in the bottom of the muffler.
If the mixture had been out enough to make it smoke (profusely) and to let fuel dribble out of the muffler it more than likely would not have run at all. A very small amount of black fluid coming out can be quite normal.

Agree with a previous poster about not dousing the internals of a saw with unnecesaary amounts of oil when assembling. Very little is needed; wrist-pin (through the underside of the piston at the little-end of the conrod), crank bearings (main and big-end) and piston rings. A couple of drops ONLY on each. Smear the oil right around the ring/s.
Spin the motor a few times before you even fuel it to distribut the oil and make sure everything is happy.

Also, next time you flood a chainsaw;
*Crank it vigourously with the throttle wide-open and NO CHOKE
if that doesn't work
*Pull the plug out and crank the thing vigourously again (with the plug-hole facing down if possible). Before replacing the plug get a propane torch onto the spark end of the plug and give it a really good cooking. Then hit it - clean it - with a wire brush, and then blow it to remove any leftovers.
Plugs can wear-out (the anode and electrode) and it's quite visible, but they hardly ever just stop working electrically - unless they are dropped. People waste a LOT of money on plugs, I reckon. They do get fouled, but that's not failure and it takes only a couple of minutes to correct with a torch and a wire brush..
 

singinwoodwackr

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It’s laste for an update… BUT a new am carb fixed everything up. Seem like I botched the carb rebuild somehow. Kept the old carb to maybe revive some day but it’s running now regardless!
Exactly what I wound up doing with one of my 346s.
same issues as well. No matter of adjustments would help…flooding…rebuilt carb several times…no joy…
 

Mike Gudgeon

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I believe a lot of modern saws have no fuel tank breather. As a result the metering mechanism (diaphram, lever, needle and GASKETS) need close attention. because pressurised fuel from the tank is trying to force its way through - and will if these parts aren't working correctly.

I haven't worked full-time sorting chainsaws for many years (decades), so if someone knows better it would be great to hear.
 

9050lx

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I have 6 of these (OEM) carbs on 350/345/346/353 type saws.Really consistent behavior as long as they are close.For me they have been very non-fussy.On the other hand, the crank and bearing area needs to be carefully sealed.(threebond1194) These saws run perfectly when there are no air leaks,even the open transfer 350's run really well.I just can't resist a good deal...
 
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I believe a lot of modern saws have no fuel tank breather. As a result the metering mechanism (diaphram, lever, needle and GASKETS) need close attention. because pressurised fuel from the tank is trying to force its way through - and will if these parts aren't working correctly.

I haven't worked full-time sorting chainsaws for many years (decades), so if someone knows better it would be great to hear.
All the saws I've seen have a tank vent, some, like the Husqvarna, is in a non-traditional place, like horizontally in the area above the handle, still a vent though..
 

Dangerous

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All the saws I've seen have a tank vent, some, like the Husqvarna, is in a non-traditional place, like horizontally in the area above the handle, still a vent though..
I just replace the Carbs of two strokes engines not really interested in rebuilding a carb only complete motor heads really understand. I’m not knocking rebuilding carbs go for it but replacement is easier. D
 

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