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Larger Husqvarna Saws - Bar and Chain Info and Education

Koot Kraftsman

Koot Kraftsman

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Just got off the phone with Madsen's... they are making me up 2 Oregon square chisel full comp loops for the 28" 92DL Tsumura Bar I bought to run on the 372. Also ordered a 7 pin .063 sprocket to match the bar/chain. This should be interesting for me since I've never run anything bigger than .050 lol
 
Bob Hedgecutter

Bob Hedgecutter

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Just got off the phone with Madsen's... they are making me up 2 Oregon square chisel full comp loops for the 28" 92DL Tsumura Bar I bought to run on the 372. Also ordered a 7 pin .063 sprocket to match the bar/chain. This should be interesting for me since I've never run anything bigger than .050 lol

You did not "need" the 7 pin 0.063 drive sprocket (but good idea to replace at same time as new chain and bar) you only need a 3/8" 7 pin driver- they work for all gauges, 0.050, 0.058 and 0.063 all work in the same driver- the important thing is the 3/8th part.
 
Maintenance supervisor

Maintenance supervisor

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Good point on the full house chain, I have been use to hardwoods here in the midwest. Although I will miss all the hardwoods from a builder's/woodworking perspective, the softwoods will be welcomed from the wood cutting/splitting aspect and the timber I have on my land up there is mainly Doug Fir, Larch and white pine, so still outstanding for structural timber.

So taking this one saw at a time, I've decided for the 372 to run 3/8 .063, I found the Tsumura bar I want but finding good chain for it is proving to be more challenging. I don't know a lot about who makes the best chain and so forth, I know I really like the Stihl and Husqvarna chain I've run in the past as well as Oregon Chain but it seems nobody sells a loop for the bar. I will be buying by the roll eventually but before I buy a roll, I want to make sure I like the bar/chain combo. What I can find are a bunch of unbranded & lower end chain from names I've never heard of... a little frustrating.
I'm looking for this chain (to fit a 28" 3/8 .063 D009 Tsumura Bar):

3/8 pitch
.063 Gauge
92DL
Round ground
Full chisel
Full comp

Am I missing something? I would think this chain would be all over the place, anyone know where I can find one made by Husky or Oregon or maybe a better brand I don't know about? I'm not even trying to find a Stihl version, although they have been my preferred chain for all my Stihl saws thus far.
 
Koot Kraftsman

Koot Kraftsman

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All good except for the square ground part... I've tried different grind styles/techniques including the square ground and hated it. I will likely hand file round ground chain the rest of my days, it's what I know well and what I prefer. I've got no beef with people that have a different way of grinding their chain I just won't use their saw.
 
HumBurner

HumBurner

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Are you only cutting trees or will you be doing any thinning/brushing work?


While a full chisel chain may give you an edge on falling and bucking CLEAN wood, semi chisel is something not to be overlooked. The cost of one or two loops of semi chisel will pay for itself in the time it takes you to sharpen and reshape blunted full chisel cutters on one bad log.

It's taken years for people to convince me to even run full chisel upon occasion. But I live in dirt/mud world where even 6'+ up a log may be covered in fines that will dull you out quick.
 
sean donato

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All good except for the square ground part... I've tried different grind styles/techniques including the square ground and hated it. I will likely hand file round ground chain the rest of my days, it's what I know well and what I prefer. I've got no beef with people that have a different way of grinding their chain I just won't use their saw.
Why is that? It's about my favorite for clean wood, definitely the fastest grind in the wood. Only down side is it can dull faster, hence why I normally run round chisel, but I always switch back to full square when I know I'm in good clean wood.
 
Woodslasher

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Why is that? It's about my favorite for clean wood, definitely the fastest grind in the wood. Only down side is it can dull faster, hence why I normally run round chisel, but I always switch back to full square when I know I'm in good clean wood.
Because it's a pain in the @ss to sharpen!
 
Koot Kraftsman

Koot Kraftsman

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First, I may have been misunderstood, let me clarify myself...

My land is literally surrounded on all sides by a national forest and virtually pristine forest, nobody using trees for target practice or hanging tire swings and the only contamination is what would naturally happen to any tree in a forest. For felling I like to use full chisel (as in not a rounded over corner) because the profile lends itself more to my style of cutting and it simply feels right.

If I'm doing any cutting on timber that has already hit the ground, been winched through the dirt or even has a high potential of being "dirty" while still on the stump, I will use semi-chisel aka round chisel because I understand that it holds it's edge longer, being more resilient cutting through the various debris that can be caught up in the bark.

But regardless of the corner profile, I prefer a hand filing with a round file to grinding (or hand filing for that matter) a square cutting edge, it just feels wrong to me. I've never been that kid that never ate his spinach because he heard all the kids at school say it was nasty, I will try almost anything once, even if for nothing else than just knowing I'm right. So yes, I've learned the habits of the "chain grinder" trying to be as efficient as possible so he can get back in the wood faster and be more productive... they carry a half dozen sharp chains with them to the site ready to swap in like a tired pitching staff. I did that one day and felt disgusted with myself (can't explain why, ‍♂️). This is the same type of person who will get the tractor and load the bucket full of rounds to move them 10 yards before he will pick them up and carry or roll them. To each their own, I've come to grips with the fact that most people find the way I work as head scratchingly odd, I really don't care anymore, I do things my way regardless and nowadays without giving anyone else's opinion a second thought, especially if I have "walked that mile in their shoes".

Every time I've tried running chain that's been square ground (by hand or grinder), it was like I was cutting without a soul... that's the only way I can explain the feeling it gave me. It just didn't feel right, didn't cut right and had ZERO romance.

Call me old fashioned if you like but when I hand file the perfect round gullet to a crisp keen edge and watch that burr roll up as I twist the file at just the right moment and in perfect rhythm it's like I'm in a trance. It's a very therapeutic interaction between me and my saw at the end of a hard day's work, the saw that has proven itself and provided me with whatever I asked of it... it's my way of thanking her for a job well done before I put her to bed. Then the next day, when I put her in the wood, it's like dancing with a woman who knows how to dance and it's because you taught her .

I once helped a buddy of mine sharpen all his chain with a grinder the way he typically does it, it felt 100% like work. From the second I flipped the switch on the grinder until I turned it off and every grind, advance, repeat in-between I shook my head and sighed. I'm also a man that will be living in the forest with no more electricity than what I produce, the nearest power line is like 50+ miles from me and on the other side of a mountain range lol. Every tool I own is powered by fossil fuel or muscle and in most cases, both. Needless to say, I'm not the guy that's going to have a bunch of electric gadgets laying around that "make life easier" like chain sharpening grinders, especially when I know I can hand file well and prefer it. For me, I like the work, I enjoy the process... If it didn't take so much time, I would be felling and bucking all my timber by hand, that's just how I am.

All that being said, there is just something I've always found intrinsically fascinating about power saws and even though I was a mechanical engineer for 25 years, I was never a gear head, not even in the slightest. I know how to fix just about anything or at least know enough to be able to figure it out but I've never enjoyed it... except with power saws, it's weird, I know. I think it has something to do with the simplicity of all the different systems jammed into one cubic foot that slings 2-4 feet of wood gnashing teeth. The fact that if you have all the tools, knowledge and parts on hand, you can completely break down and rebuild the entire thing in a few hours is a bonus too haha. I was used to repairing huge marine turbine engines, nuclear reactors and jet engines... which all take a long effin' time and patience.

And that's why
 
Maintenance supervisor

Maintenance supervisor

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Unfortunately I can't sharpen square without "readers" on , I've tried and it ain't pretty.
I don't carry glasses into the field except for my high res safety. So round file it is,but like stated I find sharpening a therapeutic activity and enjoy the hours sharpening.
I will buy square ground and find it a very good performance chain but no one locally sharpens it, I've been able to touch up 2 loops but ruined one,that found an eye bolt in a tree.
Being that a couple of my saws are dressed with some rare .404 .050 square chisel I'm careful not to cut dirty stuff, until I either get better at sharpening it or find someone who is.
 
Koot Kraftsman

Koot Kraftsman

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LMAO, I can barely sharpen even with readers but they work in the field if I'm that far away from my shop long enough. If you walked in my shop while I was sharpening chain, you would likely laugh your butt off... I wear a headset like you would find in a jewelry shop with a light and 3 levels of magnification, and sometimes you'll find me listening to disco or 80's hair band top top off the experience.
 

Nex

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Don't know about Montana really, but in Sweden I run 3/8 .063 on anything over 18'' bars. Seems to me it simply lasts longer and holds an edge better especially in frozen wood.

Edit: Yea, square filing is a pita to learn, but it's worth it. Try getting a quality pferd or vallorbe double chisel bit file, and don't bother on smaller chains, it's almost impossible to get the angles right on smaller than 3/8 imho.
 
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