Nebuchadnezzar

Nebuchadnezzar

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Hello!
I'm new to the forum (as a member), but I've benefitted by reading many of the discussions found on this website. I'm thankful you all have been so helpful to others in wrestling with saw decisions and giving them advice. Great group it seems.

I'm asking what I hope can be an unbiased question that's probably difficult to determine because one of the saws is not out yet (here in the US), but many of you may still know the brands and their latest models well enough to give some advice.

I'm looking to buy either the MS 661 CM or the brand new (starts shipping at my dealer in January 2022) Husqvarna 592XP. My question: Which saw do you think will last the longest? I'm not interested in matters of cutting speed (both I'm sure are great) or anything else, just reliability. I know that the MS 661 CM seems to be a love/hate saw because of electronic issues (earlier models) and oil leakage (current production sometimes as well), but what I don't know is how long a good MS 661 CM might last in comparison to Husky's new 592xp.

Other thoughts that may be helpful: I've owned a MS 261 CM and a MS 462 CM.
Primary usage: Storm debris removal and (some) disaster relief applications. I've climbed 80ft with my MS 261 CM, but as the husband of a family of 6 I've decided climbing is not something I want to keep doing, so I don't need the saw to be light weight. Both saws weigh the same on paper anyways. Also, this saw will probably get used more often during storm seasons and less often when not in stormy seasons.

I've had nothing but STIHL and they haven't let me down yet, but I trust Husqvarna to be great also and I have no loyalty to the brand.

Thank you all in advance for your advice!
 

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Franny K

Franny K

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Some folks on post 1 of their membership here like to put multiple tags into it. Kind of puzzling. Husqvarna seems to be making some of their products able to communicate with an ap (short for application on a smart phone). Your use case likely involves employees or volunteers, Not sure what the ap does but it might be able to decide who to let use the more expensive models you have. If you think maintance interval is important besides when to take it into a dearer for fees the smart phone ap I believe it will do some of that. Which one has the longest exposure to gasoline in the flexible parts before detoriationg I suppose is another consideration. You already have Stihl 3003 mount bars.
 
MontanaResident

MontanaResident

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My ms290 was 10 years old when I sold it, so I could upgrade to a pro saw. 10 years!!! And it was still going strong. IMO, most saws die an early death, either straight gassed, dropped from a height, run over by your truck, a tree falls on it, a log rolls over it, etc.

In other words, Stihl or Husky longevity? Flip a coin. Chances are either will die from neglect or accident before it dies from old age.
 

Den

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My rules for saw longevity:
1) Do not loan it out to anyone.
2) Buy a $20 Poulan Wild Thing to loan to people.
3) Run full synthetic Amsoil.
4) Run high octane, non-ethanol gas in it.
5) Don't keep pre-mix fuel sitting around for more than 2 weeks... and store in metal can... and not in 150 degree tool shed.
6) Always shake the fuel can, and even shake the saw, if it has gas in the tank, to mix the oil/fuel before starting the saw.
7) Put small amount of Stabil in fuel immediately after purchase.
8) Set carb screws rich (counter-clockwise).
9) Be mindful of where the saw is at all times, when on or off the job.
10) Store it in a hardcase with guide bar sheath/scabbard.
11) When using the saw, ask yourself: "Is what I'm about to do, safe?"

.
 
ericm979

ericm979

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My rules for saw longevity:

11) When using the saw, ask yourself: "Is what I'm about to do, safe?"

.

That should be #1, and for reasons besides not damaging the saw.

For the OP, a 462 can run a 32" bar which will cut a 5' diameter tree. I've done it with a 460. You might need to increase the oil pump output but it will pull it. If you have a lot of those or even larger trees then yea a 660 class machine is in the cards. I know there are guys who will cut 18" logs with a 660 but IMO that's overkill.
 
CR888

CR888

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He wants a precise answer to a saw that's not released and another that's been out for a few years. We have know idea whether he'll use it 2hrs per year or a 1000. Given what we do know the 592xp will last 5.216 years & the MS661 will last 4.631 years.

Disclaimer: results may vary from 1day-25years.
 
sean donato

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He wants a precise answer to a saw that's not released and another that's been out for a few years. We have know idea whether he'll use it 2hrs per year or a 1000. Given what we do know the 592xp will last 5.216 years & the MS661 will last 4.631 years.

Disclaimer: results may vary from 1day-25years.
Exactly why I answered how I did. The 592xp is unknown at this point.
 
Huskybill

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I used the Husqvarna 2100 cd/2101xp in my main line up for decades, mainly everything till they took a backseat to my Husqvarna 266 se. I had no problems running the bigger saws with shorter bars.

As far as longevity it’s what 2t oil, what ratio, how much maintenance is done inbetween usage. To cut down on engine wear how often do you sharpen the chain?
 
Canyon Angler

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For as little as I use it, I expect my 660 to long outlast me. There's no replacement for displacement when it comes to big wood, but I don't find enough big trees to need the 660 very often, and I ain't gonna lug around that heavy, hungry, gas-guzzling monster for small trees, that's for sure. YMMV.
 

Den

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One thing I like about the 390xp is they are non-strato old school design saw lots of power and has been a proven design for years of production, 395 the same thing but find them a bit too much saw for everyday work.
Yes Gord404,
I wrestled with wanting a 390/395 Husky. Thing is, my 372 XP and Pioneer Poulan Pro 455 do well on big stuff, and I try to avoid the really monster tree's.
Additionally, the 390 is almost the same price and weight as the 395. Having a harder and harder time justifying spending money on those big saws... and I can find ways to justify buying a lot of things, but this is a tuffy.
I'd really like to just find an affordable 390/395 that is burned up, straight gassed, and rebuild it.


.
 
Bob Hedgecutter

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I gazed long and hard into my favourite crystal ball (the left one) and it told me, for a saw not yet released like the 392XP, expect a production falling economic lifespan for a pro users daily saw of 24 months minimum.
Then it told me, expected lifespan in the hands of an experienced casual non-pro user- UNKNOWN.
Final revelation was, expected lifespan in the hands of a novice without a clue and no premixed fuel- approximately half of the first tank of gas.

@Den , keep your eyes and ears open for a 2188, sometimes they fly beneath the radar because they are NOT orange and do not have a 390XP sticker- but basically they ARE a 390XP.
 
Woodslasher

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Yes Gord404,
I wrestled with wanting a 390/395 Husky. Thing is, my 372 XP and Pioneer Poulan Pro 455 do well on big stuff, and I try to avoid the really monster tree's.
Additionally, the 390 is almost the same price and weight as the 395. Having a harder and harder time justifying spending money on those big saws... and I can find ways to justify buying a lot of things, but this is a tuffy.
I'd really like to just find an affordable 390/395 that is burned up, straight gassed, and rebuild it.


.
@rupedoggy has a quite reasonably priced 395 builder saw.
 
Nebuchadnezzar

Nebuchadnezzar

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Thank you all for the replies!

I can't respond to what everyone has said individually, but here are a few thoughts:

I know that the new saws from Husqvarna are not out yet, but sometimes people have used products from a company that were recently produced and those products do speak to one degree or another about where the company is heading. Some would say that all the new saws (both companies) are pushing higher power outputs and lighter weights, and potentially skimping on where some of that weight should have stayed for the longevity of the saw. Some would also say that any saw with AT or M-tronic won't last as long as an MT saw. I really don't know, but I do like M-tronic so far.

I'll say that I've put a 28" bar with a full comp chain on my MS 462 CM and I could tell a pretty dramatic difference between that and my 24" bar and same chain. (I still don't know why the 28" bar only measures about 2.5" longer than the 24" bar...). And others on this forum have also suggested that the MS 462 is simply designed for smaller stuff because of the changes to bore and stroke (compared to the MS 461), changes that are nice for limbing for sure.

I have a great Stihl dealer that I've purchased all my equipment from, so I'll probably just stick with them when I get around to looking for the next saw. I don't have loyalty to Stihl because of their saws, but its hard to forget your dad telling you "Stihl makes the best chainsaw" when you're a kid :)

Thanks again.
 

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