Lost a Red Maple and now same symptoms on a Weeping Cherry

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Nitecapt

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My red maple suffered fissures in thebark from which it oozed sap and like an idiot I did nothing about it. Now over 50% of the tree is dead and will have to be removed. 15 feet away is a Weeping Cherry starting to show the same signs an I don't want to lose that too. Can anyone tell me what this is and how to fix it? I have posted photos of the problem. Thank you in advance for any solutions offered. The pictures arn't too clear because they were taken on a cloudy day. The second and third probably show it the best. On the third it's happening at the graft. The others are on the trunk.
Thanks again
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pdqdl

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Nitecapt

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I don't suppose that you have any pictures of the long-gone maple?

On first glance, that looks like gummosis. Cherry trees are pretty well known for gummosis. Is this a fruiting cherry, or a landscape tree?

Read more here and see if this fits your problems: https://www.missouribotanicalgarden...diseases/cankers/gummosis-of-fruit-trees.aspx
In fact, I do. Here are some photos. You can see that 1/2 the tree is still alive but if I trim it, it will become all lopsided. In fact it looks similar. How do I fix it?

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Nitecapt

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That's way too bad, those two trees looked great togther too bad there is no known xure,
 

pdqdl

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Diagnosing tree death/decline from a few pictures is pretty difficult. I don't see anything that jumps out at me as a solution for the maple's problems, but I suspect that digging around at the root flare might reveal some problems.

In my experience, it usually takes a combination of unfavorable conditions to kill off a tree. Soil & water conditions play a big role, as well as how the tree was planted. Add in some unfavorable weather conditions, and you end up with a weakened tree that succumbs to a disease that it might otherwise outgrow or remain unaffected by.

Before planting a replacement, I would suggest doing some soil analysis and perhaps invite an arborist or two out to evaluate your dead tree. Then invite an experienced landscaper out to make some recommendations. Don't forget to consult with your local county extension agent, and their collection of "master gardeners", who often love to come out to consult with folks on their plant problems. Then compare everyone's notes, and see if any of their ideas are commonly agreed upon. If you get 6 "expert opinions" and none of them agree? They are probably all clueless, with at most one that might be right.
 

Raintree

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The small pustule of gummosis on the weeping cherry stem is a minor concern. The swelling at the lower trunk is of interest.
The necrosis of the lower stem on the Japanese maple most likely stems from a root collar restriction.
The two trees do not have a common pathogenic issue. However it's possible that the abiotic root collar disorder is present on the cherry.
 

pdqdl

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What he said, I think. :yes:

Which was the short way to express what I said:
...but I suspect that digging around at the root flare might reveal some problems.

The only way to know for sure is to look closer, do some digging, and consult with an experienced person "on-site". You will be looking for girdling roots, wire or rope not removed from the planted root ball, evidence of having been planted too deep, or just some other problem that might be discovered when exposed.
 

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