Low-kickback chain for Jonsered 2159c

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jr195

jr195

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Nov 28, 2021
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I inherited a Jonsered 2159c from the guy I bought the house from, which I've been using to cut hardwoods for firewood occasionally for the last year, but am a chainsaw amateur. The chain is dull, and looks to me like a full chisel, so I'd like to get a new one that's low-kickback. It's 3/8" .058 68dl 18", and I can't seem to find a low-kickback chain anywhere to order. Is this size just meant for pros, so low-kickback requires me to switch to the seemingly more common .325/.050 ? And that requires new drive sprocket and bar, correct? How can I tell which bars are compatible? This http://www.saulco.com/specs.php?model=CS 2159 is the only place I can find any specs at all on this saw, including on Jonsered's website. Even the manual is generic and doesn't have specs.

Reading these forums I realize I got lucky getting this nice machine, so I'd like to take care of it -- besides keeping the air filter clean, what else should I be inspecting/maintaining?
 
Franny K
Joined
Jan 16, 2013
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North eastern Ct USA
It seems that there is 3/8 chisel low kickback chain from Oregon in the Vanguard product. https://loggerchain.net/collections/73v-chain They might shorten it for you if you ask, strange they don't offer a whole lot of lengths perhaps it is going obsolete. 73dpx in Oregon is what you want but semi chisel. At least it has bumper drive links not sure if it is called out as low kickback. Or M73dpx which will soon be no longer available with the thicker chrome layer. Not sure about what Stihl offers in 3/8 0.058.

Like you surmise changing to .325 sprocket chain and bar will give more lower kickback choices especially in chisel chain. Calling it more common probably isn't accurate for a 60cc saw in the USA.
 
ericm979

ericm979

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60cc saws usually use 3/8 chain. You'll find a better selection of chain if you had a .050 gauge bar. .050 is the most common gauge, .058 the least common for 3/8 chain.

Unlike a lot of people here I don't dismiss anti-kickback chain out of hand. Except for bore cuts which are an advanced technique it can cut just as well as regular chain. But anti-kickback chain just reduces kickback some, it does not eliminate it. If you are getting kickback you should change your technique. And of course anti-kickback does not address the other accidents that you can have with a saw. OTOH since it cuts as well with the exception noted above, for many cases there's no reason not to use it.

No matter what chain you use you should learn how to sharpen it. A chain can be filed many times before it's no longer usable. Buying a new one each time is wasteful and encourages cutting with a dull chain which is hard on the saw and is less safe. The flat Oregon file guides that clip on the file are a good way to start filing. Supposedly the Stihl guides are also good though I have not used them. Your dealer can set you up.
 
irhunter

irhunter

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Except for bore cuts which are an advanced technique it can cut just as well as regular chain.
I agree with everything Eric writes, except about bore cuts. I am no expert on safety chain, but I have run a handfull of saws with safety chain (of various makes)...and, never had a bit of trouble with bore cuts. I did not find those chains especially slow or at all chattery in bore cuts.

Bore cuts are only an "advanced technique" when introductory saw courses don't teach the method. If one's first day of cutting includes bore cuts...then, it is as natural and basic as any other cut.

Roy
 
computeruser

computeruser

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Good additional points here. Bore cuts are basic if you are an European sawyer, but advanced-bordering-on-off-limits if you are a US sawyer. I do not think we've necessarily got it right in that regard here.

One other thought, at least based on my experience, is that kickback events are often the result of a bar that is too long - it sticks past what you're cutting and hits other stuff - more than the specific sort of chain being used. Imagine cutting logs on a pile where you're cutting the log in front of you, but your bar contacts some other log behind it and does unexpected things. OP is already running a suitably short bar (I like the feel of those 357/359 and Jonsered equivalents with 16-18" bars) so I think he's good on that front.

I know I've beaten this point to death here before, but since OP is new, I'll mention it again: I do most of my cutting anymore with a ported 40-50cc saw, a 13" bar, and Oregon 20LP chain. This means lots of bar-buried cuts, lots of bore cuts, cuts with both top and bottom of the bar, and you know what, I've had far fewer "surprises" happen with this sort of setup than I did with bigger powerheads and longer bars that stick out the far side of the cut. For an illustration of how much of the time the bar tip was buried, see the marks on the log in the second pic down on this thread https://www.arboristsite.com/threads/good-money-after-bad-the-ported-543xp.349133/

If this 2159 were my saw, I'd run Oregon 73LGX chain on it on the existing 18" bar. Easy to sharpen by hand, cuts well, and affordable, and that bar length is about perfect for that powerhead. Don't overthink this - run good chain, keep it sharp, and follow basic safety protocols. https://www.oregonproducts.com/en/powercut™-saw-chain,-18"/p/73lgx068g
 

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