McCulloch Chain Saws

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Maintenance supervisor

Maintenance supervisor

Every 100yrs, All new people...
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I do have a few 69772 on hand, I'll try to remember to look on Wednesday when I am back in the shop to confirm the thickness. In taking saws apart I have found no washers, fiber washers, steel washers, and fiberglass reinforced polyester washers used between the oil tank and the fuel tank.

The insulator between the fuel tank/airbox and the cylinder is thinner on the 70 cc saws and thicker on the 54/57/60 cc models and pretty well accounts for the spacing between the fuel tank and oil tank so that spacer up front doesn't seem to be a big factor in the way the saws go together or perform in the long run.

Many saws also have/had a fiber insulating washer between the shroud and the airbox (68581), many saws are missing this one as well. I have a few of these also, again I will try to remember and measure the thickness of those too.

Mark
I've found all sorts of washers in there in my neck of the woods. I inquired about this practice in the old saw shops that had McCulloch repairs and they were all under the impression that if you didnt install some sort of washer in there after a tank gasket replacement then you could warp the tank and cause it to leak at the seam.
Ofcourse this was caused by the srinking cork gasket or a ham fisted tech over torquing everything, but its still reguarded as common practice around here.
 
bob kern

bob kern

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I've found all sorts of washers in there in my neck of the woods. I inquired about this practice in the old saw shops that had McCulloch repairs and they were all under the impression that if you didnt install some sort of washer in there after a tank gasket replacement then you could warp the tank and cause it to leak at the seam.
Ofcourse this was caused by the srinking cork gasket or a ham fisted tech over torquing everything, but its still reguarded as common practice around here.
Thanks
 
edju1958

edju1958

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I find that rather odd Mark that you haven't found any washers of any type in the saws you've dismantled.I've taken apart several 2-10 & 10 -10 saws & have found fiber washers in every one.The washers were in between the oil tank & fuel tank,& in between the rear handle & heat shield.I was told that it's very important to put the washers back in so as not to have things warp.
 
edju1958

edju1958

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I've found all sorts of washers in there in my neck of the woods. I inquired about this practice in the old saw shops that had McCulloch repairs and they were all under the impression that if you didnt install some sort of washer in there after a tank gasket replacement then you could warp the tank and cause it to leak at the seam.
Ofcourse this was caused by the srinking cork gasket or a ham fisted tech over torquing everything, but its still reguarded as common practice around here.
Exactly as I was told too.
 
vizette

vizette

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Hello all i just got my first mac. A guy at work knew i like to tinker so he gave me a eager bever 2.0. I looks like a nice little guy. I wanted to check out the cylinder but when i touched the plug boot it crumbled and the plug cap wire thing pulled out of the plug wire. Where can i get a coil for this saw? Are the Chinese ones any good?. Thank you

Most people like to hate on these because you have to dismantle the entire saw to do pretty much anything on them. However, once you do it a couple times it really only takes a few minutes. Kind of a pain compared to the larger ones, but not bad. They're snappy little saws and will run forever.

If you want to peek at the cylinder/piston to get an idea of what kind of condition they're in, take the muffler off and look in there.

Regarding the plug wire, as Syncop8r showed, you can buy just a replacement boot. If the wire is cracked to the point of arcing/shorting you can theoretically replace the wire. Many of us have done it on larger models, but I can't speak to trying with the smaller ones. I would assume the same process, twist out the old (might be epoxied in), clean out remnants in the coil, and twist a new one on (with some adhesive/sealant).

I'm not sure if all 2.0 have the electronic coils, I think they do. If that's the case those can be a little pricey relatively speaking and you might be better off just buying a "parts saw" - they're usually pretty cheap on ebay, and a lot of people just toss them so you might be able to get one for free on craigslist or marketplace or something. That'd also give you extra parts down the road should you decide to keep it.
Just did a search while writing this, there's a 2.0 electronic on ebay for $15 right now. Might also try Bob Johnson (607 638 9297) phone only, old school but good guy. He'll want a part number and/or exact model/serial number.

I did see a thread on another site where someone used an aftermarket coil for a Husqvarna as a replacement, and I believe it was under $15 on Amazon last I checked. It required some effort to retrofit but nothing outrageous. I suppose you could also use a non-electronic coil and an ignition module, but then you're probably back at the price of an original replacement.

If you just want to see if it'll run, wrap it in electrical tape and see what happens, and then go from there.
 
bob kern

bob kern

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Hello all i just got my first mac. A guy at work knew i like to tinker so he gave me a eager bever 2.0. I looks like a nice little guy. I wanted to check out the cylinder but when i touched the plug boot it crumbled and the plug cap wire thing pulled out of the plug wire. Where can i get a coil for this saw? Are the Chinese ones any good?. Thank you
If you hit a wall on this PM me and I will dig in my saw shed. I’m pretty sure I have three or four of those sitting back there on the shelf.
 
edju1958

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I finished up on the PM55 today.I popped the flywheel off & got another handful of crud from under it.The flywheel itself was caked with crud as well.I found a lock plate & bolt for the handle brace on the bottom of the saw & that's taken care of.The only thing left for me to do is wait for the needle adjuster boot/grommet,& at the rate old Bob's going I probably won't see that till next yr.

The next thing on my agenda is to rebuild a RH start recoil.I've already got the spring in & the pulley on.I just need to tension the pulley & put the teardrop plate & retaining ring back in.Also a new handle.
 
gumneck

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Super 250 recoil is not recoiling. I can clearly see the backside Off direction and it didn't budge just by hand. So before I go breaking anything, is this piece threaded? What is the typical tool/method used to remove this to get to the inside/spring area?
Thanks, only the second Mc I've been into and still haven't completed the first. super250 recoil side.jpegsuper250 recoil side2.jpeg
 
bob kern

bob kern

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to my memory, yes they are threaded.
Last time I messed with one of those I put the rope side in my vise with wood jaws and used a piece of square steel stock in the notch on the other side. Mine took just a little more than I could do by hand though and I would be careful with putting too much torque on those tabs.
I'm probably the least knowledgeable fella on here so be patient and get some other ideas from the pros. There are great guys on here with tons of experience and good ideas!
 
Woodslasher

Woodslasher

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Super 250 recoil is not recoiling. I can clearly see the backside Off direction and it didn't budge just by hand. So before I go breaking anything, is this piece threaded? What is the typical tool/method used to remove this to get to the inside/spring area?
Thanks, only the second Mc I've been into and still haven't completed the first. View attachment 947269View attachment 947270
The end does unscrew, if I recall there is some way to stop the pulley (maybe with a rod?) and then you just use a bar/screwdriver to unscrew the notched end.
 
vinnywv
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Bob is correct as far as ive done. Same thing, put the pulley in a vice and use a piece of whatever between the tabs and twist in the direction of the arrow. Dont tighten the vice too much or that cast pulley could break. It is likely on there for many years but itll pop loose. I believe i used a large screwdriver. Be careful. Maybe use a bit of blue wrench, just a bit though....torch.
 
lohan808

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Im not 100% sure. The plug wire looked like it had some cracks in it. I was thinking if a new coil was cheap and easy enough to come by i would go that route but if not that photo you posted will definitely get the old one working again. Thank you
You could put on a sleeve of heat shrink on the coil wire before replacing the boot and clip.
 
gumneck

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Thanks all for the help and Northwestsaws' pics showing a screwdriver thru all 3 slots in the pulley and base. Got it off pretty easily with two screwdrivers. I mistakenly thought the entire backplate came out...amateur! The spring end isn't bent down enough to catch in the slot I think.super250 recoil removal.jpegsuper250 recoil removal2.jpeg
 
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