Nova tractor chipper

thewalnutguy

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I've been using a Valby pto chipper for about 25 years, works great but wanted to get a chipper with powered rollers. I'm primarily using the chipper for branch trimming from black walnut, and have had to do quite a bit of side branch trimming to get the larger (3 to 4 inch diameter) to feed . Looked at the sites for several brands, found most of them were "currently out of stock". Would have preferred a USA made unit, but ended up going with Nova Tractor's BX102. I've had several issues with the mill, to start with one of the knobs to hold the input chute in position was missing, probably because the holes in the input chute didn't line up, preventing the guy assembling the unit at the factory from installing it. The distributor did provide a replacement, had to wait for it to come from China. The big issue however is that, especially when chipping smaller branches, especially those from spruce or cedar, there is significant accumulation of debris building up in the chipping chamber, wrapping around the flywheel's axle and between flywheel and sides of chamber. Contacted distributor, was directed to 1) adjust blade-to-anvil clearance to 2 to 3 mm max, and 2) run the chipper at higher rpm. I found that adjusting the blade clearance was a problem, as there's about 4 mm variance from one blade to another, so have to have clearance of 5 mm to prevent the blade with the minimum clearance from striking the anvil. Distributor said that variance of 5 mm or less "is acceptable". The chipper is sold as being used with either 540 or 1000 rpm, comes with a 540 6-spline connector. My tractor has only a 540 rpm pto. Distributor says that they've had issues with pine or cedar "stucking" the unit, that chipping "real wood" will help to clear the unit. When the unit gets crammed with debris, it takes over half an hour to get it cleared out using a variety of tools to pull out the debris, after first waiting for the flywheel to cool down from its rubbing against the debris. I've come to regret by choice to purchase this unit.
C
 

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dennis066

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I've been using a Valby pto chipper for about 25 years, works great but wanted to get a chipper with powered rollers. I'm primarily using the chipper for branch trimming from black walnut, and have had to do quite a bit of side branch trimming to get the larger (3 to 4 inch diameter) to feed . Looked at the sites for several brands, found most of them were "currently out of stock". Would have preferred a USA made unit, but ended up going with Nova Tractor's BX102. I've had several issues with the mill, to start with one of the knobs to hold the input chute in position was missing, probably because the holes in the input chute didn't line up, preventing the guy assembling the unit at the factory from installing it. The distributor did provide a replacement, had to wait for it to come from China. The big issue however is that, especially when chipping smaller branches, especially those from spruce or cedar, there is significant accumulation of debris building up in the chipping chamber, wrapping around the flywheel's axle and between flywheel and sides of chamber. Contacted distributor, was directed to 1) adjust blade-to-anvil clearance to 2 to 3 mm max, and 2) run the chipper at higher rpm. I found that adjusting the blade clearance was a problem, as there's about 4 mm variance from one blade to another, so have to have clearance of 5 mm to prevent the blade with the minimum clearance from striking the anvil. Distributor said that variance of 5 mm or less "is acceptable". The chipper is sold as being used with either 540 or 1000 rpm, comes with a 540 6-spline connector. My tractor has only a 540 rpm pto. Distributor says that they've had issues with pine or cedar "stucking" the unit, that chipping "real wood" will help to clear the unit. When the unit gets crammed with debris, it takes over half an hour to get it cleared out using a variety of tools to pull out the debris, after first waiting for the flywheel to cool down from its rubbing against the debris. I've come to regret by choice to purchase this unit.
C
Jinma wood chipper has the same issues. I added a plate to the infeed to deflect the brush/limbs toward the outside away from the axle but wrapping around the axle was still an issue with Cedar! You have to vary the wood as the manufacturer states and that doesn't eliminate the clogging. Not the chippers fault! I have an old drum chipper that didn't have that issue.
 
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Edit: old thread that got bumped.

Is this it? https://novatractor.com/BX102-wood-chipper

400 and something pound flywheel for $4400 delivered? That is amazing compared to Echo, Pequea, Salsco. The Woodmax is likely the out of stock one you mention. This one shows out of stock.

Why not loosen the blade that sticks out the farthest and shim the rear of it? Some of these chippers use blades that are half the length lessening the point loads and perhaps more air paddle per bite.

I looked at the vertical offset of the top pin to the lower pins and it is 24 inches for cat 2. I believe this is the case for certain parts of the world but it is 19" for Cat 2 here in the USA. I guess it will pick up the rear of it real good. Any idea about this aspect? Logging winches seem to have the top pin real high on the implement for some reason.

Interesting chip wagon there in the video has the pto shaft extended to the rear and remote 3 point hitch. Where can one get one of those?
 

CaseyForrest

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I Have an 8H as well. Been very pleased with it.

I got on their list I believe back in September or October and had the chipper delivered early December.

They show in stock right now.
 

leaf

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Most of these posts are really old, but for some reason this thread showed up in the e-mail I received last night. In any event, I have a considerable amount of experience with one of these (as with a Valby, and with a re-constructed / reconfigured tow-behind - and some rentals, and ... actual Vermeers). For whatever it might be worth, in no particular order:
-- One needs to have access to a decent shop (tools, welder, steel) to own one of these. If you don't have a shop, you need a friend who does.
-- I do have a 1000 rpm PTO on 60-odd HP PTO tractor (older 4 cyl Deere diesel) - I would not put this chipper on anything less.
-- In fact this chipper is happy even at 1200 -- it is direct drive and the bearings for the main shaft are good.
-- Be careful with the PTO drive shaft angle. I let the rotation stop before lifting....
-- The hydraulic motor that runs the drive is too low volume (meaning it runs at too high RPM with not enough torque) (all hydraulic motors are sized by cubic inches of fluid per revolution)
-- The "teeth" on the infeed are smaller than they should be (or on other chippers)
-- I have removed the plate beneath the infeed and just let the wood "grindings" fall on the ground.
-- There are a series of funky-isms in, for instance, the mechanism that rotates the output chute. Best to de-funkify them - real farm-style pin clip in a through hole, etc. Similarly, a good piece of small rope does much better than a kinda cheesy chain that came with mine to move the output angle.
-- You can satisfactorily sharpen your own knives for these chippers on a belt grinder. Think about it, then start slowly.
-- The original flat head hex drive knife bolts that came with mine were junk steel. (Actually had a knife "crash" when one set failed. Replace them w/ bolts from McMaster-Carr or similar. Tighten the bolts very "effectively" (I use a torque wrench to be sure.)
-- There are some things you have to ignore. One of the input drive shafts on this one is slightly mis-aligned and makes a noise as it goes around (grease, etc. notwithstanding -- not the issue) I've decided to get used to it -- total pain actually to fix. The relationship between moving the feed control bar and the hydraulic control valve that the bar operates is unreasonable. I have changed the middle rod to a stainless round (threaded) and, so far, pretty much just accept the somewhat grunky geometry.
-- The machine will take anything 4" and less, indefinitely long. Bigger and say, oak, and you should "burp" the piece in.
-- The true issue is teaching those people who you love and need and who are your help to cut the material that is going into the chipper so that it goes. It is possible to develop an "eye" for chipability -- even for the oddest shaped white oak branches. Possible, I say. Some people figure it out -- some struggle, cut stupid little bits... and still leave knotty right angles longer than 6 inches. Those who understand can start with the tree and get the branches chipped without hanging any "diagonally" in the feed box.
-- Generally, for the life this chipper lives, over 4" is firewood, gets burned in some stove some winter. Therefore the chipper is actually big enough for its job. If there is something that is "isn't" -- it isn't "foolproof" enough. The ******* thing needs to be "understood."
-- For whatever it is worth, I have never clogged around the spindle -- and I have thrown one after another white pine and pitch pine branch in there. Noticeable only with pine is that one gets more debris on the ground under the infeed (where the pan no longer is).
 

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