Octane question

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Yeah, BAD idea putting MoGas in your 1945 Luscombe! You'll be landing preferably in a farm, but possibly on a highway, river, lake, or a house when the valves beat the **** out of themselves and their seats. Very VERY small percentage of aircraft running MoGas as of right now. Most are in the experimental class.

I've run just about every kind of gasoline available at one point or another, and have worked on the same. Leaded fuel leaves a grayish-whitish ashy layer on EVERYTHING - piston crown, cylinder head, exhaust port if 2-stroke - intake AND exhaust valves on 4-stroke, and in the exhaust system (little muffler on a saw, or a whole system on a car, motorcycle, or off-road machine). Eventually this can foul plugs. That's why for aviation applications they sell TCP. It does a very good job at cleaning all these deposits up. If you run 100LL long enough, things will require cleaning.



As far as the health aspects of lead ... mercury ... or [insert scaaary chemical HERE], you should fear your genetics more than ANYTHING you might come in contact with throughout your life.

My mom never drank, never smoked, jogged around the neighborhood every chance she got, and never EVER bought soda or sugary snacks, much to my chagrin as a kid. She went to the doctor for EVERY little tiny thing. She was afraid of EVERYTHING - said sugar caused cancer. Said margarine cause cancer. Eggs give you heart attacks. She did everything "right", and died at 72. Genetics.

My dad passed mercury the teacher poured into his hand around the classroom when he was a kid. He rolled it around in his hand for a minute or so, marveling at its properties like every kid in that class did. After he dropped out of high school, he was in the Navy breathing in leaded fuel all day every day on the flight deck of the USS Constellation, worked with my grandfather with the door closed in the winter in their homebuilt garage on his cars and the Model T's and others of that era my grandpa used to restore, dunking parts with bare hands in gasoline, heating oil, MEK, or whatever chemical they had on hand that WORKED - no gloves, no masks - those were for PUSSIES! :surprised3: No EPA in those days!! He worked at Norton Company in Worcester, MA where abrasive dust clouds were breathed in for 30 years straight, plus, he chain-smoked cigarettes for 54 years straight after Red Cross "relief cigarettes" got him hooked during cleanup of the tornado of 1955 that rolled through his home town east of Worcester ... and he's still alive today. His 82nd birthday is this weekend.

My grandfather lived to 85, only because he refused treatment for the giant cancerous tumor that bulged out of his neck towards the end of his life. He said the chemo, "...was worse than the cancer!" He didn't get lung cancer from breathing in asbestos brake and clutch dust, leaded paint (and gasoline) fumes & dust for decades, nor the radioactive substances he handled that were unregulated in his youth, he didn't get skin or bone cancer from being up to his elbows in all kinds petroleum products for 7 decades of his life, and he didn't poison his family to an early grave dumping stale LEADED gas and used motor oil 100' away from his well (my grandma lived to 91) (and never mind the stuff they BURNED in those days!) - he got a random cancerous tumor on his NECK that was detected early, but after one round of chemo, he quit.

To contrast that, you'll see people who started smoking in high school, and are talking through a "talk box" at age 23. Or someone who handled asbestos insulation for a half hour in their 20's, and end up with mesothelioma in their 40's. It's all genetics - some things will get ya if your body is so inclined.

I'm either going to die at 71 or 72 like my maternal grandfather or my mom, OR, I'll live to my mid 80's like my paternal grandpa and my dad. Not going to sit here and worry about which one it'll be. I just live life when I can afford to, since at the end of the day, no matter what you THINK might kill you doesn't matter in the slightest. It's your GENETICS that WILL kill you.

That's why this guy that's petrified of heights flies paramotors. I'm 100x more likely to die of an asthma or heart attack, or choking on food thanks to 5 decades of asthma medication side-effects.

View attachment 1051595

Here's a fun video I shot this summer. Enjoy! :)


You can't do much about genetics. You can choose not to expose your self to toxic substances for no good reason...
 
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Do you know what a peroxide is? Chemical properties and reactivity are much different than hydrocarbons. They do not need heat spark nor flame to explode.


Point being? So can flatulence.
MTBE units blowing up wasnt an issue....

The point is the EPA got after MTBE because people complained of the taste and smell. This is mentioned right on the EPA's website btw.
 
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That's exactly what I am saying. A lot has happened in 7 years in the industry.
I've had plenty of industry specific Chem training, took organic and inorganic in college and have a BS. What sort of training o. Oil refining do you have?
In regards to MTBE. So what your saying is the EPA conspired with the oil industry to keep MTBE from being listed as a known carcinogen?
I taught college chemistry and have experience in difficult separations of complex mixtures organic compounds. That science forms the basis for your refining.

And yes, the EPA is corrupted. They let General Electric off the hook for their PCB contamination which is still an ongoing sham. Currently they propose making an unlined PCB dump over an aquifier, to save GE money.

One of the EPA shills negotiated one of the clandestine settlements with GE, then quit and was rewarded with a no show job with GE. His name was Devillars, look it up.
 
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MTBE units blowing up wasnt an issue....

The point is the EPA got after MTBE because people complained of the taste and smell. This is mentioned right on the EPA's website btw.
They went after MBTE because of leaking storage tanks at filling stations and aquifer contamination. Not because people smelled the crap in their tap water, although they might have smelled it, given the levels of pollution

BTW, the CDC has a website too. Lots of stuff about a "safe and effective" vaccine.....
 

sean donato

Chainsaws are like crack... just can't get enough.
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How much i$ canned fuel$?
Around $21.00 something a gal if you buy 4 gallons at lowes the other day for Tru fuel. $23 and change for 1 gallon.
It's also known as UL91. Not widely available and I have never seen it.
The problem is aviation piston engines are very old technology wise and it's a royal pain to get anything new certified. It's even more of a pain to get old engines certified to run on unleaded fuels. As a result very few aviation motors are certified to run on unleaded fuels even though most don't need the lead or the octane level.
There was talk a while back about some sort of new lead free avgas that was in the testing phase. I didn't keep up with its progress.
I have to give you some chit @sean donato .. it's Alkylate. Alkyd refers to paint!
You knew what I meant. 🤣

Yeah, BAD idea putting MoGas in your 1945 Luscombe! You'll be landing preferably in a farm, but possibly on a highway, river, lake, or a house when the valves beat the **** out of themselves and their seats. Very VERY small percentage of aircraft running MoGas as of right now. Most are in the experimental class.

I've run just about every kind of gasoline available at one point or another, and have worked on the same. Leaded fuel leaves a grayish-whitish ashy layer on EVERYTHING - piston crown, cylinder head, exhaust port if 2-stroke - intake AND exhaust valves on 4-stroke, and in the exhaust system (little muffler on a saw, or a whole system on a car, motorcycle, or off-road machine). Eventually this can foul plugs. That's why for aviation applications they sell TCP. It does a very good job at cleaning all these deposits up. If you run 100LL long enough, things will require cleaning.



As far as the health aspects of lead ... mercury ... or [insert scaaary chemical HERE], you should fear your genetics more than ANYTHING you might come in contact with throughout your life.

My mom never drank, never smoked, jogged around the neighborhood every chance she got, and never EVER bought soda or sugary snacks, much to my chagrin as a kid. She went to the doctor for EVERY little tiny thing. She was afraid of EVERYTHING - said sugar caused cancer. Said margarine cause cancer. Eggs give you heart attacks. She did everything "right", and died at 72. Genetics.

My dad passed mercury the teacher poured into his hand around the classroom when he was a kid. He rolled it around in his hand for a minute or so, marveling at its properties like every kid in that class did. After he dropped out of high school, he was in the Navy breathing in leaded fuel all day every day on the flight deck of the USS Constellation, worked with my grandfather with the door closed in the winter in their homebuilt garage on his cars and the Model T's and others of that era my grandpa used to restore, dunking parts with bare hands in gasoline, heating oil, MEK, or whatever chemical they had on hand that WORKED - no gloves, no masks - those were for PUSSIES! :surprised3: No EPA in those days!! He worked at Norton Company in Worcester, MA where abrasive dust clouds were breathed in for 30 years straight, plus, he chain-smoked cigarettes for 54 years straight after Red Cross "relief cigarettes" got him hooked during cleanup of the tornado of 1955 that rolled through his home town east of Worcester ... and he's still alive today. His 82nd birthday is this weekend.

My grandfather lived to 85, only because he refused treatment for the giant cancerous tumor that bulged out of his neck towards the end of his life. He said the chemo, "...was worse than the cancer!" He didn't get lung cancer from breathing in asbestos brake and clutch dust, leaded paint (and gasoline) fumes & dust for decades, nor the radioactive substances he handled that were unregulated in his youth, he didn't get skin or bone cancer from being up to his elbows in all kinds petroleum products for 7 decades of his life, and he didn't poison his family to an early grave dumping stale LEADED gas and used motor oil 100' away from his well (my grandma lived to 91) (and never mind the stuff they BURNED in those days!) - he got a random cancerous tumor on his NECK that was detected early, but after one round of chemo, he quit.

To contrast that, you'll see people who started smoking in high school, and are talking through a "talk box" at age 23. Or someone who handled asbestos insulation for a half hour in their 20's, and end up with mesothelioma in their 40's. It's all genetics - some things will get ya if your body is so inclined.

I'm either going to die at 71 or 72 like my maternal grandfather or my mom, OR, I'll live to my mid 80's like my paternal grandpa and my dad. Not going to sit here and worry about which one it'll be. I just live life when I can afford to, since at the end of the day, no matter what you THINK might kill you doesn't matter in the slightest. It's your GENETICS that WILL kill you.

That's why this guy that's petrified of heights flies paramotors. I'm 100x more likely to die of an asthma or heart attack, or choking on food thanks to 5 decades of asthma medication side-effects.

View attachment 1051595

Here's a fun video I shot this summer. Enjoy! :)


Sorry brother I got enough genetics against me, don't need to add anymore to it.
 
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I taught college chemistry and have experience in difficult separations of complex mixtures organic compounds. That science forms the basis for your refining.



And yes, the EPA is corrupted. They let General Electric off the hook for their PCB contamination which is still an ongoing sham. Currently they propose making an unlined PCB dump over an aquifier, to save GE money.



One of the EPA shills negotiated one of the clandestine settlements with GE, then quit and was rewarded with a no show job with GE. His name was Devillars, look it up.
If you want to continue the chemistry discussion please PM me. I'd be more than happy.
 

Joseph W Santora

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Yeah, BAD idea putting MoGas in your 1945 Luscombe! You'll be landing preferably in a farm, but possibly on a highway, river, lake, or a house when the valves beat the **** out of themselves and their seats. Very VERY small percentage of aircraft running MoGas as of right now. Most are in the experimental class.
Not so small a percentage.

Approved Engines​

Continental
A-65-1, A-65-3, A-65-6, A-65-6J, A-65-7, A-65-8, A-65 (0-170-3), A-65 (0-170-7), A-65-8F, A-65-8FJ, A-65-8J, A-65-9, A-65 (0-170-5), A-65-9F, A-65-9FJ, A-65-9J, A-65-12, A-65-12F, A-65-12FJ, A-65-12J, A-65-14, A-65-14F, A-65-14FJ, A-65-14J, A-75-3, A-75-6, A-75-6J, A-75-8, A-75-8F, A-75-8J, A-75-8FJ, A-75-9, A-75-9J, C-75-8, C-75-8F, C-75-8FH, C-75-8FHJ, C-75-8FJ, C-75-8J, C-75-12, C-75-12F, C-75-12FH, C-75-12FHJ, C-75-12FJ, C-75-12J, C-75-12B, C-75-12BF, C-75-12BFH, C-75-15, C-75-15F, C-85-8, C-85-8F, C-85-8FHJ, C-85-8FJ, C-85-8J, C-85-12, C-85-12F, C-85-12FH, C-85-12FHJ, C-85-12FJ, C-85-12J, C-85-14F, C-85-15, C-85-15F, C-90-8F, C-90-8FJ, C-90-12F, C-90-12FH, C-90-12FJ, C-90-12FP, C-90-14F, C-90-14FH, C-90-14FJ, C-90-16F, 0-200-A, 0-200-B, 0-200-C, C-115-1, C-115-2, C-125-1, C-125, E-165-2, E-165-3, E-165-4, E-185-1, E-185-2, E-185-3, E-185 (0-470-7), E-185 (0-470-7A), E-185-5, E-185-8, E-185-9, E-185 (0-470-7B), E-185-10, E-185-11, E-225-2, E-225-4, E-225-8, E-225-9, 0-300-A, 0-300-B, 0-300-C, 0-300-D, 0-300-E, C-145-2, C-145-2H, C-145-2HP, GO-300-A, GO-300-B, GO-300-C, GO-300-D, GO-300-E, GO-300-F, 0-470-A, 0-470-E, 0-470-J, 0-470-K, 0-470-L, 0-470-R, 0-470-S, 0-470-4, 0-470-11, 0-470-11B, 0-470-11-CI, 0-470-11B-CI, 0-470-13, 0-470-13A, 0-470-15, IO-470, IO-470-J, IO-470-K, IO-520, W670-6A, W670 (R-670-3), W670 (R-670-5), W670-6N, W670 (R-670-4), W670-16, W670 (R-670-8), W670 (R-670-11), W670 (R-670-11A), W670-23, W670-24, W670-K, W670-M
Franklin
6A4-150-B3, 6A4-150-B4, 6A4-150-B31, 6A4-165-B3, 6A4-165-B4, 6A4-165-B6, 4AC-176-B2, 4AC-176-B3, 4AC-176-BA2, 4AC-176 (0-175-1), 4AC-176-BA3, 4AC-176-C2, 4AC-176-C3, 4AC-176-D2, 4AC-176-D3, 4AC-176-F2, 4AC-176-F3
Jacobs
R-755-A1, R-755-A2, R-755-B1, R-755-B2, R-755 (L-6), R-755 (L-6M), R-755 (L-6MA), R-915-7 (L-6MB), R-915-1 (L-6MBA), R-915-3 (L-6MBA), R-915-5 (L-6MBA), R-830-1 (L-5), L-5M, L-5MB, R-755-7, R-755-7 (L-4), R-755-9 (L-4MB), R-755 (L-4M), R-755-1 (L-4MA), R-755-3 (L-4MA7)
Kinner
R-5 Series 2, R-55, R-56, R-540-1, R-540-3
Lycoming
0-145-A1, 0-145-A2, 0-145-B1, 0-145-B2, 0-145-B3, 0-145-C1, 0-145-C2, GO-145-C1, GO-145-C2, GO-145-C3, 0-235-C, 0-235-C1, 0-235-C1B, 0-235-E1, 0-235-E1B, 0-235-C1C, 0-235-C1A, 0-235-H2C, 0-235-C2A, 0-235-E2A, 0-235-E2B, 0-235-L2A, 0-235-L2C, 0-235-M1, 0-235-M2C, 0-235-M3C, 0-235-N2A, 0-235-N2C, 0-235-P1, 0-235-P2A, 0-235-P2C, 0-235-P3C, 0-290-A, 0-290-AP, 0-290-B, 0-290-1, 0-290-C, 0-290-3, 0-290-CP, 0-290-D, 0-290-11, 0-290-D2, 0-290-D2A, 0-290-D2B, 0-290-D2C, 0-320, 0-320-A1A, 0-320-A1B, 0-320-A2A, 0-320-A2B, 0-320-A2C, 0-320-A2D, 0-320-A3A, 0-320-A3B, 0-320-A3C, RAM 160 Conversion, 0-320-B1A, 0-320-B1B, 0-320-B2A, 0-320-B2B, 0-320-B2C, 0-320-B3A, 0-320-B3B, 0-320-B3C, 0-320-C1A, 0-320-C1B, 0-320-C2A, 0-320-C2B, 0-320-C2C, 0-320-C3A, 0-320-C3B, 0-320-C3C, 0-320-D1A, 0-320-D1B, 0-320-D1C, 0-320-D1D, 0-320-D1F, 0-320-D2A, 0-320-D2B, 0-320-D2C, 0-320-D2F, 0-320-D2G, 0-320-D2H, 0-320-D2J, 0-320-D3G, 0-320-E1A, 0-320-E1B, 0-320-E1C, 0-320-E1F, 0-320-E2A, 0-320-E2B, 0-320-E2C, 0-320-E2D, 0-320-E2F, 0-320-E2G, 0-320-E2H, 0-320-E3D, 0-320-E3H, 0-320-E1J, 0-360-B1A, 0-360-B1B, 0-360-B2A, 0-360-B2B, 0-360-D1A, 0-360-D2A, 0-360-D2B, 0-360-A1A, 0-360-A1AD, 0-360-A1D, 0-360-A1F, 0-360-A1F6, 0-360-A1F6D, 0-360-A1H, 0-360-A1H6, 0-360-A1G, 0-360-A1G6, 0-360-A1G6D, 0-360-A1LD, 0-360-A1P, 0-360-A2A, 0-360-A2D, 0-360-A2E, 0-360-A2F, 0-360-A2G, 0-360-A2H, 0-360-A3A, 0-360-A3AD, 0-360-A3D, 0-360-A4A, 0-360-A4AD, 0-360-A4D, 0-360-A4G, 0-360-A4J, 0-360-A4K, 0-360-A4M, 0-360-A4N, 0-360-A5AD, 0-360-C1A, 0-360-C1C, 0-360-C1E, 0-360-C1F, 0-360-C1G, 0-360-C2A, 0-360-C2C, 0-360-C2E, 0-360-C4F, 0-360-C4P, 0-360-F1A6, 0-360-G1A6, 0-360-J2A, H0-360-C1A, 0-435, 0-435-A, 0-435-C1, 0-435-1, 0-435-C1, 0-435-11, 0-435-C2, 0-435-13, 0-540-B1A5, 0-540-B1B5, 0-540-B1D5, 0-540-B2A5, 0-540-B2B5, 0-540-B2C5, 0-540-B4A5, 0-540-B4B5, 0-540-A1A, 0-540-A1A5, 0-540-A1B5, 0-540-A1C5, 0-540-A1D, 0-540-A1D5, 0-540-A2B, 0-540-A3D5, 0-540-A4A5, 0-540-A4B5, 0-540-A4C5, 0-540-A4D5, 0-540-D1A5, 0-540-E4A5, 0-540-E4B5, 0-540-E4C5, 0-540-F1B5, 0-540-G1A5, 0-540-G2A5, 0-540-H1A5, 0-540-H2A5, 0-540-H1A5D, 0-540-H2A5D, 0-540-H1B5D, 0-540-H2B5D, R-680-E3, R-680-E3A, R-680-E3B, R-680-9, R-680-13, R-680-E1, R-680-E2, R-680-6, R-680-B6, R-680-D5, R-680-D6, R-680-B2, R-680-BA, R-680-2, R-680-4, R-680-B4, R-680-B4B, R-680-B4C, R-680-B4D, R-680-B4E, R-680-5, R-680-7, R-680-8, R-680-11, R-680-17, R-680-B5, 0-540-F1B5 (Derated for Robinson), 0-320 Series (Derated for Robinson), 0-360 Series (Derated for Robinson)
Lycoming (Helicopter)
0-320, 0-360, 0-540
Pratt & Whitney
R-985-13, R-985-17, R-985-19, R-985-23, R-985-25, R-985-27, R-985-39, R-985-39A, R-985-48, R-985-50, R-985-AN-1, R-985-AN-1M1, R-985-AN-2, R-985-AN-3, R-985-AN-4, R-985-AN-5, R-985-AN-6, R-985-AN-6B, R-985-AN-8, R-985-AN-10, R-985-AN-12, R-985-AN-12B, R-985-AN-14B, R-985-AN-1BM1, R-985-T1B2, R-985-T1B3, R-985-B-4, R-985-B-5, R-985-SB, R-985-SB-2, R-985-SB-3, R-1340-E, R-1340-19, R-1340-22, R-1340-29, R-1340-36, R-1340-40, R-1340-47, R-1340-49, R-1340-49M1, R-1340-51, R-1340-AN-1, R-1340-AN-2, R-1340-51M1, R-1340-53, R-1340-57, R-1340-59, R-1340-61, R-1340-S1D1, R-1340-S3H1, R-1340-S3H1G, R-1340-S1H2, R-1340-S1H1, R-1340-S1H4, R-1340-S3H2, R-1830-49, R-1830-53, R-1830-57, R-1830-82, R-1830-92, R-1830-92A, R-1830-96, R-1830-SC-G, R-1830-SC3-G, R-1830-S1C-G, R-1830-S1C3-G, R-1830-S4C4-G, R-1830-43, R-1830-43A, R-1830-61, R-1830-65, R-1830-67, R-1830-75, R-1830-86M2, R-1830-90B, R-1830-90C, R-1830-90D, R-1830-94, R-1830-94M1, R-1830-94M2, R-1830-S3C4-G
Ranger
6-440-C2, 6-440-C3, 6-440-C4, 6-440-C5
Rolls Royce
0-200-A, 0-200-B, 0-200-C, 0-300-A, 0-300-B, 0-300-C, 0-300-D, C90-8F, C90-8FJ, C90-12F, C90-12FH, C90-12FJ, C90-12FP, C90-14F, C90-14FH, C90-14FJ
Schweizer
300CB
Warner
Super Scarab 40, 50 (R-500-2), Super Scarab 50A (R-500-4), Super Scarab 50A (R-500-6), Scarab 28, Scarab 29, Scarab 30, Scarab 40, Scarab 50, Super Scarab 165 (R-500-1), Super Scarab 165 (R-500-7), Super Scarab 165-A, Super Scarab 165-B, Super Scarab 165-D, Super Scarab 185, Super Scarab 185J (R-500-1), Super Scarab 185J (R-500-3), Super Scarab 185K

 

Kodiak Kid

Idiot with a "power saw"
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And then there is winter gas! I gives people fits every spring on the first hot day when their saws vapor lock ! Had that **** blow right up in my face when opening the cap. Most people dont even know about it.
How dose the gas pressurize in the fuel tank when the tank is vented? I don't think I've ever had that problem, nor had a vapor lock problem. That being said. My Saws don't sit for months at a time without being ran either.
 
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How dose the gas pressurize in the fuel tank when the tank is vented? I don't think I've ever had that problem, nor had a vapor lock problem. That being said. My Saws don't sit for months at a time without being ran either.
The tank vent lets air in not out. One way valve on the saws I have. I have lots of saws sitting right now here. Pain in the Azz with keeping Ethanol fuel fresh.
 
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So what are the percentages of xylenes and toluene in gasoline you produce? I'll have to dig out old GC/MS chromatograms to give you real numbers. And I'll add, there still is detectable amounts of benzene.

Ethanol/oxygenated fuels were primarily introduced to reduce emissions (remember MTBE? a carcinogen that got in ground water from spills), not to boost octane. In fact it is not economical to obtain ethanol from corn without government subsidies. If the government subsidies were cut off, E10 would disappear.

Farmland should be used to grow food for people and animals. Part of the cost of food is directly related to the use of farmland/food crops for E10.
Well said professor. There is at least 1 woodsman, you gives a fiddlers fart about your info. We are talking about chainsaws, and cutting up wood for fuel. You are on a different plane....
 
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Yeah, BAD idea putting MoGas in your 1945 Luscombe! You'll be landing preferably in a farm, but possibly on a highway, river, lake, or a house when the valves beat the **** out of themselves and their seats. Very VERY small percentage of aircraft running MoGas as of right now. Most are in the experimental class.

I've run just about every kind of gasoline available at one point or another, and have worked on the same. Leaded fuel leaves a grayish-whitish ashy layer on EVERYTHING - piston crown, cylinder head, exhaust port if 2-stroke - intake AND exhaust valves on 4-stroke, and in the exhaust system (little muffler on a saw, or a whole system on a car, motorcycle, or off-road machine). Eventually this can foul plugs. That's why for aviation applications they sell TCP. It does a very good job at cleaning all these deposits up. If you run 100LL long enough, things will require cleaning.



As far as the health aspects of lead ... mercury ... or [insert scaaary chemical HERE], you should fear your genetics more than ANYTHING you might come in contact with throughout your life.

My mom never drank, never smoked, jogged around the neighborhood every chance she got, and never EVER bought soda or sugary snacks, much to my chagrin as a kid. She went to the doctor for EVERY little tiny thing. She was afraid of EVERYTHING - said sugar caused cancer. Said margarine cause cancer. Eggs give you heart attacks. She did everything "right", and died at 72. Genetics.

My dad passed mercury the teacher poured into his hand around the classroom when he was a kid. He rolled it around in his hand for a minute or so, marveling at its properties like every kid in that class did. After he dropped out of high school, he was in the Navy breathing in leaded fuel all day every day on the flight deck of the USS Constellation, worked with my grandfather with the door closed in the winter in their homebuilt garage on his cars and the Model T's and others of that era my grandpa used to restore, dunking parts with bare hands in gasoline, heating oil, MEK, or whatever chemical they had on hand that WORKED - no gloves, no masks - those were for PUSSIES! :surprised3: No EPA in those days!! He worked at Norton Company in Worcester, MA where abrasive dust clouds were breathed in for 30 years straight, plus, he chain-smoked cigarettes for 54 years straight after Red Cross "relief cigarettes" got him hooked during cleanup of the tornado of 1955 that rolled through his home town east of Worcester ... and he's still alive today. His 82nd birthday is this weekend.

My grandfather lived to 85, only because he refused treatment for the giant cancerous tumor that bulged out of his neck towards the end of his life. He said the chemo, "...was worse than the cancer!" He didn't get lung cancer from breathing in asbestos brake and clutch dust, leaded paint (and gasoline) fumes & dust for decades, nor the radioactive substances he handled that were unregulated in his youth, he didn't get skin or bone cancer from being up to his elbows in all kinds petroleum products for 7 decades of his life, and he didn't poison his family to an early grave dumping stale LEADED gas and used motor oil 100' away from his well (my grandma lived to 91) (and never mind the stuff they BURNED in those days!) - he got a random cancerous tumor on his NECK that was detected early, but after one round of chemo, he quit.

To contrast that, you'll see people who started smoking in high school, and are talking through a "talk box" at age 23. Or someone who handled asbestos insulation for a half hour in their 20's, and end up with mesothelioma in their 40's. It's all genetics - some things will get ya if your body is so inclined.

I'm either going to die at 71 or 72 like my maternal grandfather or my mom, OR, I'll live to my mid 80's like my paternal grandpa and my dad. Not going to sit here and worry about which one it'll be. I just live life when I can afford to, since at the end of the day, no matter what you THINK might kill you doesn't matter in the slightest. It's your GENETICS that WILL kill you.

That's why this guy that's petrified of heights flies paramotors. I'm 100x more likely to die of an asthma or heart attack, or choking on food thanks to 5 decades of asthma medication side-effects.

View attachment 1051595
Has to be, hands down, the longest, most boring post since filing re-coil handles.
Here's a fun video I shot this summer. Enjoy! :)

 

Smitty Smithsonite

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Not so small a percentage.
Just because it's "approved" doesn't mean everyone is using it. A TINY, minuscule percentage of pilots are. Why change what has worked for 100 years, especially when your life and others on the ground depend on it?

The stuff that can run it without worry is modern. Ever price an aircraft built in the past 10 years? Astronomical. The venerable Cessna 172 sells at around 3/4 of a MILLION dollars ... Not too many people lining up to buy new aircraft these days as compared to older stuff.

On top of that, it's a tiny, minuscule percentage of airports that even carry it on site.
 

smcowboy1974

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I used to run 87 ethanol yrs ago until fuel lines started going bad. After that from time to time I would run 89 nonethanol, now I just run 91 octane nonethanol. All saws are tuned for the high octane. I did run 100ll once in a while mixed 40 percent with 89 nonethanol just for the fun of it. If my mix I use now sits for more than 6 monthes I add a quart of 100ll mix to 3 quarts of regular mix. I also use Klotz octane booster from time to time. It's worked well for me. IF I know the fuel is going to sit for more than a few monthes I add the Klotz right away. Klotz Octane Booster also has fuel stabilizers in it. All you have to add is one ounce per gallon.
 
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Just because it's "approved" doesn't mean everyone is using it. A TINY, minuscule percentage of pilots are. Why change what has worked for 100 years, especially when your life and others on the ground depend on it?

The stuff that can run it without worry is modern. Ever price an aircraft built in the past 10 years? Astronomical. The venerable Cessna 172 sells at around 3/4 of a MILLION dollars ... Not too many people lining up to buy new aircraft these days as compared to older stuff.

On top of that, it's a tiny, minuscule percentage of airports that even carry it on sitsi

This is correct in regards to usage

As for the why change part. Lead is bad, period. At some point 100LL will go away because of this reason alone.
 

Smitty Smithsonite

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People tell me it's bad ... but if it were REALLY as bad as they say, wouldn't every single one of our ancestors be retarded? Or have lung cancer? Of course we were all smart enough to not HUFF exhaust back in the day ...

My grandfather was a brilliant mechanic, and jack-of-all-trades. He milled his own lumber, and built his own tractor out of a Model T and 2 transmissions in series to haul the logs out of the woods to build his house when the bank refused to loan him money. He hunted and sold pelts and cleaned and repaired oil burners for boilers all through the Depression, was a machinist at Norton Co. - I have some of his custom made tools still in his original Snap-On tool box. He restored Model T parts right up until the week he died. He was far from mentally challenged.
 
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People tell me it's bad ... but if it were REALLY as bad as they say, wouldn't every single one of our ancestors be retarded? Or have lung cancer? Of course we were all smart enough to not HUFF exhaust back in the day ...

My grandfather was a brilliant mechanic, and jack-of-all-trades. He milled his own lumber, and built his own tractor out of a Model T and 2 transmissions in series to haul the logs out of the woods to build his house when the bank refused to loan him money. He hunted and sold pelts and cleaned and repaired oil burners for boilers all through the Depression, was a machinist at Norton Co. - I have some of his custom made tools still in his original Snap-On tool box. He restored Model T parts right up until the week he died. He was far from mentally challenged.
I won't argue that with you. The science on it is settled and has been for decades.
 
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