on road diesel

osb_mail

osb_mail

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What kind on additive do you use in your chipper if you have to use on road diesel ?I heard that you should not run on road diesel if you dont use a additive is this true ?
 
John464

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thats a new one. Ive only heard of the difference being a red dye for off road, which is tax exempt for road tax usage. the on road diesel doesn't have this tax but is taxed for on-road usage.

All my off road equipment has been using off road diesel for years. Never an issue, nor do I add anything to it.
 
osb_mail

osb_mail

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I pretty sure there is difference it has to do with how sulfur is in it I am not sure just what I have herd .I would say there is difference in the smell for sure .
 
John464

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The problem is with using on road in off road motors .

done that too. low sulfur diesel has come into play recently and I have never put that in any off road equip. I have put on road diesel into off road equipment last year before most stations started carrying the low sulfur stuff and never an issue. Things may have changed like your saying since the latest low sulfur diesel emmision laws and just about all stations are now carrying low sulfur diesel. Im wondering if the off road diesel is also low sulfur?
 
Curbside

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I don't know what the rules and content of your fuel in your states are but here we call it Purple fuel and the only difference is that it is coloured. It comes from the same source as regular fuel. Farmers are only allowed to use that fuel here as certain taxes have been taken off the cost. If you get caught on the road or using it in construction machines for non-agriculture reasons you face high fines and an audit from the tax department.
 
jerseywild

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No problem using low sulfur in the chipper the sulfur does act as an lubricant for the engine. You may foul up your emission equipment if you use high sulfur in the new diesel engines.
 
Mowingman

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There is now no difference in on-road and off-road diesel, except for the red dye. In the past, off road diesel had a higher sulfur content. However, some time back the govt. put a stop to the use of high sulfur diesel. So, now they are the same, except for the red dye indicating that no highway tax has been paid on the off road stuff.
Jeff
 

DDM

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As of last yr all on road diesel had to be 15 ppm sulfer.If you read any of the major oils websites it states that low sulfer fuel has been known to cause leaks in the fuel systems of pre 2007 diesel vehicles.Sulfur causes the orings in your injector pump to swell as the old on road had plenty of sulphur.Remove the sulfer and the o rings shrink and eventually collapse.I use an addative in every other tank full of fuel.Off road fuel still has sulpher in it and the epa will not require the removal of that sulphur for another 9 yrs.If you take a look you off road equipment still smokes like a diesel should and you truck doesnt near as much as it used to.
Reports show some oring failures my local mechanic has seen Quite a few.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ultra-low_sulfur_diesel
United States

As of September 2006, on-highway diesel fuel sold at retail locations in the United States is ULSD[4].

Ultra-low sulfur diesel was proposed by EPA as a new standard for the sulfur content in on-road diesel fuel sold in the United States since October 15, 2006, except for rural Alaska. California required it since September 1, 2006, and rural Alaska will transition all diesel to ULSD in 2010. This new regulation applies to all diesel fuel, diesel fuel additives and distillate fuels blended with diesel for on-road use, such as kerosene, however, it does not yet apply to train locomotives, marine, or off road uses. By December 1, 2010, all highway diesel will be ULSD. Non-road diesel transitioned to 500 ppm sulfur in 2007, and to ULSD in 2010. Locomotive and marine diesel also transitioned to 500 ppm sulfur in 2007, and to ULSD in 2012. There are exemptions for small refiners of nonroad, locomotive and marine diesel that allow for 500 ppm diesel to remain in the system until 2014. After December 1, 2014 all highway, nonroad, locomotive and marine diesel produced and imported will be ULSD.

The EPA mandated the use of ULSD fuel in model year 2007 and newer highway diesel fuel engines equipped with advanced emission control systems that require the new fuel. These advanced emission control technologies will be required for marine diesel engines in 2014 and for locomotives in 2015.

The allowable sulfur content for ULSD (15 ppm) is much lower than the previous U.S. on-highway standard for low sulfur diesel (LSD, 500 ppm), which not only reduces emissions of sulfur compounds (blamed for acid rain), but also allows advanced emission control systems to be fitted that would otherwise be poisoned by these compounds. These systems can greatly reduce emissions of oxides of nitrogen and particulate matter.

Because this grade of fuel is comparable to European grades and engines will no longer have to be redesigned to cope with higher sulfur content and may use advanced emissions control systems which can be damaged by sulfur, the standard may increase the availability of diesel-fueled passenger cars in the U.S. European diesels are much more popular with buyers than those available in the U.S.

Additionally, the EPA is assisting manufacturers with the transition to tougher emissions regulations by loosening them for model year 2007 to 2009 light-duty diesel engines.[5] As a result, Honda, Nissan, Subaru, Toyota, and others are expecting to begin producing diesel vehicles for the U.S. market to join those from Mercedes-Benz and Volkswagen.[6]

According to EPA estimates, with the implementation of the new fuel standards for diesel, nitrogen oxide emissions will be reduced by 2.6 million tons each year and soot or particulate matter will be reduced by 110,000 tons a year.

On June 1st, 2006, U.S. refiners were required to produce 80% of their annual output as ULSD (15 ppm), and petroleum marketers and retailers were required to label[7] diesel fuel, diesel fuel additives and kerosone pumps with EPA-authorized language disclosing fuel type and sulfur content. Other requirements effective June 1st, 2006, including EPA-authorized language on Product Transfer Documents and sulfur-content testing standards, are designed to prevent misfueling, contamination by higher-sulfur fuels and liability issues. The EPA deadline for industry compliance to a 15 ppm sulfur content was originally set for July 15, 2006 for distribution terminals, and by September 1, 2006 for retail. But on November 8, 2005, the deadline was extended by 45 days to September 1, 2006 for terminals and October 15, 2006 for retail. In California, the extension was not granted and followed the original schedule. As of December, 2006, the ULSD standard has been in effect according to the amended schedule, and compliance at retail locations was reported to be in place.

Sulfur is not a lubricant, however the process used to reduce the Sulfur also reduces the fuel's lubricating properties. Lubricity is a measure of the fuel's ability to lubricate and protect the various parts of the engine's fuel injection system from wear. The processing required to reduce sulfur to 15 ppm also removes naturally-occurring lubricity agents in diesel fuel. To manage this change ASTM International (formerly the American Society for Testing and Materials) adopted the lubricity specification defined in ASTM D975 for all diesel fuels and this standard went into effect January 1, 2005. [8]

The refining process that removes the sulfur also reduces the aromatic content and density of the fuel, resulting in a minor decrease in the energy content, by about 1%. This decrease in energy content may result in reduced peak power and fuel economy. The reduction is only slight and will likely go unnoticed.

ULSD will run in any engine designed for the ASTM D-975 diesel fuels.

It is, however, known to cause seals to shrink (Source: Chevron paper) and can cause fuel pump failures in Volkswagen TDI engines; biodiesel blends are reported to prevent that failure (Source: HRCCC.org Biodiesel Best Management Practices).
 

DDM

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There is now no difference in on-road and off-road diesel, except for the red dye. In the past, off road diesel had a higher sulfur content. However, some time back the govt. put a stop to the use of high sulfur diesel. So, now they are the same, except for the red dye indicating that no highway tax has been paid on the off road stuff.
Jeff

I beg to differ.
Ultra-low sulfur diesel was proposed by EPA as a new standard for the sulfur content in on-road diesel fuel sold in the United States since October 15, 2006, except for rural Alaska. California required it since September 1, 2006, and rural Alaska will transition all diesel to ULSD in 2010. This new regulation applies to all diesel fuel, diesel fuel additives and distillate fuels blended with diesel for on-road use, such as kerosene, however, it does not yet apply to train locomotives, marine, or off road uses. By December 1, 2010, all highway diesel will be ULSD. Non-road diesel transitioned to 500 ppm sulfur in 2007, and to ULSD in 2010. Locomotive and marine diesel also transitioned to 500 ppm sulfur in 2007, and to ULSD in 2012.

High sulfer Diesel also costs them less to produce as it doesnt have to be refined as much.
 
osb_mail

osb_mail

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OK now we are getting some where but it seems on road about the only fuel you can get easily so what kind of stuff should we use as a additive ?
 
Jumper

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I don't know what the rules and content of your fuel in your states are but here we call it Purple fuel and the only difference is that it is coloured. It comes from the same source as regular fuel. Farmers are only allowed to use that fuel here as certain taxes have been taken off the cost. If you get caught on the road or using it in construction machines for non-agriculture reasons you face high fines and an audit from the tax department.

Farmers are not the only ones that use it. We also use it here in all mine trucks and other machines eg graders as they do not go on any public roads ergo why pay the road tax portion of the perlitre cost, which is considerable
 
Curbside

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Farmers are not the only ones that use it. We also use it here in all mine trucks and other machines eg graders as they do not go on any public roads ergo why pay the road tax portion of the perlitre cost, which is considerable


There are certain industries that are allowed to use it here as well. Commerical Fisherman, Some Logging Operations and Mining operations and Cities and Municpalities. All of them must use it on off road applications except cities and municipalities can use it for road repair (only with their own machines) Contractors are NOT allowed to use dyed fuel on any of their machines and the regulations specifically specify even if the machines are used in off road activies they must use non-dyed fuels.
 
2dogs

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An old thread but here goes. I only can speak about the situation in Collyfornia. Here diesel is a "pipeline product", that is there is only 1 diesel fuel specification for all the refineries and all fuel is blended to that spec. Once the jobbers recieve the diesel they can blend in additives, however there is no standard for "premium diesel" so one so called premium can be different from another. Here we have red dyed off road diesel. The only difference from pipeline diesel is the dye. In additioin some diesel, both on road and off road, can be a winter blend. Winter mix varies by station because of the local climate. All of our diesel is ultra-low sulfur, ULSD.

We used to have and may still have a green (IIRC) dyed diesel for commercial fishing boats. You will be happy to know in a national emergency on road vehicles may use off road fuel.

BTW say NO to biodiesel. Converting food crops to biodiesel crops to reduce price is a crime against humanity. Planet earth needs to grow all the food it can so no person regardless of how poor they are has to starve. I would rather pay a higher price for diesel than use government subsidised biodiesel. Reclaimed oils are OK to use but don't amount to much gallonage right now.

Same goes for corn based ethanol but this could become a huge battle. Obama is in the pocket of the corn lobby, in other words ADM (spit), and he will push for ethanol cars and increasing the ethanol content of gasoline. Of course ADM will have a patent on the only acceptable corn hybrid.

Diesel today was $4.10/gal!!!

http://www.energy.ca.gov/gasoline/

http://www.wellworthproducts.com/articles/colordiesel.asp

http://www.exxon.com/USA-English/GFM/Products_Services/Fuels/Diesel_Fuels_FAQ.asp
 
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diesel&coffee

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I put 1/2 quart +/- of 30 wt NON DETERGENT oil in my CUMMINS 2500 truck with some diesel clean/other MOST tanks... sometimes I forget...

Now that B20 diesel can be had in in South Texas I usually run that- except when it gets really cold! Then I opt for old mix! My injectors are clean, my top cyn spotless and my left pump happy.. With B20 my mpg goes up an average of 2.5 on the highway!
 
26newtreeguy

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So can I run the off-road diesel in my chipper. When it is running it running off road. But it being towand on the road. So is ok in MA to run off road diesel in the chipper!? thanks for any find back Carl
 

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