Please explain Oregon forestry to me.

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jimrb

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Hey, the national park visitor center was closed so I could not look for answers. Babies afraid of Covid. I did a 5 day gravel and sand bicycle race a week ago. I was at the bottom 10% every day overweight and grossly undertrained. Race was a figure of speech for me but there were people doing each day in half the time I took. Day 1 sent me into dehydration and muscle cramps after about 3 hours. Another three hours to finish though. A few days to recover from that deficit. Days 4 and 5 I was starting to feel human with just one sore knee.

Day 1 started in Sisters, headed over to McKenzie. Along the way desert riding and lots of sand. We popped out eventually in green forests with some relatively huge trees, Maybe 3-4 foot diameter. Day 2 McKenzie to Oak Ridge. Day 3 Loop Oakridge to Oakridge via Grass Mountain, Timbered Rock and such. Day 4 Oakridge to LaPine. Day 5 Lapine back to Sisters via Three Creek Meadow. That summit that lets you ride for almost 15 miles downhill riding through isotherms of 110F. Holy crud there are some sandy forestry roads that are just power sucking to get through when it is so bone dry.

I was raised in Ohio west of Cleveland. Maples and Oaks with some pines. I moved down to the Atlanta area 38 years ago. Pines, Oaks, Poplar and other tall stuff. I tend to like places with taller trees. When I go to Colorado I might see mighty oaks maybe 15 feet tall. By streams I might see big tall cottonwoods. A few days of Colorado and I am missing some tall trees. Rambling back to my Oregon trip. What 4 or 5 tall and wide species did I see along the way in the forests? I am guessing some spruce, and maybe some fir. I heard someone mention some other tree that I cannot remember. One of the trees seemed to have lacey leaves so I am guessing some sort of cedar. Anyhow educate me on the most likely big trees I saw and I will go to my tree book to look up.

Thanks

Jim
 

Woodslasher

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Hey, the national park visitor center was closed so I could not look for answers. Babies afraid of Covid. I did a 5 day gravel and sand bicycle race a week ago. I was at the bottom 10% every day overweight and grossly undertrained. Race was a figure of speech for me but there were people doing each day in half the time I took. Day 1 sent me into dehydration and muscle cramps after about 3 hours. Another three hours to finish though. A few days to recover from that deficit. Days 4 and 5 I was starting to feel human with just one sore knee.

Day 1 started in Sisters, headed over to McKenzie. Along the way desert riding and lots of sand. We popped out eventually in green forests with some relatively huge trees, Maybe 3-4 foot diameter. Day 2 McKenzie to Oak Ridge. Day 3 Loop Oakridge to Oakridge via Grass Mountain, Timbered Rock and such. Day 4 Oakridge to LaPine. Day 5 Lapine back to Sisters via Three Creek Meadow. That summit that lets you ride for almost 15 miles downhill riding through isotherms of 110F. Holy crud there are some sandy forestry roads that are just power sucking to get through when it is so bone dry.

I was raised in Ohio west of Cleveland. Maples and Oaks with some pines. I moved down to the Atlanta area 38 years ago. Pines, Oaks, Poplar and other tall stuff. I tend to like places with taller trees. When I go to Colorado I might see mighty oaks maybe 15 feet tall. By streams I might see big tall cottonwoods. A few days of Colorado and I am missing some tall trees. Rambling back to my Oregon trip. What 4 or 5 tall and wide species did I see along the way in the forests? I am guessing some spruce, and maybe some fir. I heard someone mention some other tree that I cannot remember. One of the trees seemed to have lacey leaves so I am guessing some sort of cedar. Anyhow educate me on the most likely big trees I saw and I will go to my tree book to look up.

Thanks

Jim
I’m gonna guess you saw assorted pine/fir species, some cedars and/or redwoods, and possibly some big leaf maples and a few oak trees as well.
 

jimrb

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I did see maples. We have those in Ohio and Georgia. If I saw redwoods I did not know it. Shame on me. I have not been to California to see their redwoods forests. I need to put that visit on my short list if that state lets me in.

Thanks
 

Husky Man

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For the Conifers, you likely saw Lodgepole, around LaPine(my Mother inherited a small property near there), maybe some Ponderosa, especially moving into the mountains
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The bark on the larger Ponderosas has a “Patchwork Quilt “ look to it

I haven’t been over Willamette Pass in quite awhile, but on the Western side, you probably saw Douglas Fir, some Cedars and maybe White Fir, possibly some Spruce, but I typically see those closer to the Coast

Doug
 

jimrb

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Thanks. I am disappointed the forestry/park service was closed. Maybe they would have had an interpretive display open.
 
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The maples were most likely Big Leaf Maple. They grow along with Douglas-fir, and Western Hemlock. You also saw Western Red Cedar in that area. On the east side, like was said, Lodgepole Pine and Ponderosa Pine with a Doug-fir mixed in. Doug-fir is all one species but the trees growing on the dryer side of the mountains have adapted to that dryness and may be harder than the west (wet) side Dougs. Their growth rings are closer together. You were too far north for Redwoods, unless somebody planted a few.

Doug-fir can get quite large, depending on the site conditions. It's grown all over the PNW wet side and is a popular wood for mills.
 

pbilly

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I agree with what has been said you likely saw Ponderosa, Lodgepole, maybe some white pine tree in the derert areas, probably saw cedar, doug fir, hemlock, spuce, maple, oak, alder, possibly giant sequoia and california redwood although they wouldnt be giants like the redwood forest but they are scattered around the state
 

M.D. Vaden

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I agree with what has been said you likely saw Ponderosa, Lodgepole, maybe some white pine tree in the derert areas, probably saw cedar, doug fir, hemlock, spuce, maple, oak, alder, possibly giant sequoia and california redwood although they wouldnt be giants like the redwood forest but they are scattered around the state

Depends on what size "giant" begins at. Now I'm curious what hidden specimens may be hiding for non-indigenous species. Recently, we found a new world's tallest Sequoiadendron in Oregon, and at 214 feet tall, it can seem giant to some people when they look at it.

 
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