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threeputt

threeputt

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We have a poplar tree in our back yard that I am not sure if I need to have it cur down or not. I have live here 48 years and it was pretty large when we bought this home. It is about 35 feet from the back of the house. The tree is at least 70 feet tall . I am guessing maybe 75 years old.
I really don't know if it has disease or not but I will upload a few pictures and see what others might think. I live in central Alabama. A man priced taking it down for $1200 which does seen fair.
 

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Bango Skank

Bango Skank

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That’s a poplar, but autocorrect seems to like “ popular “ more often lol.

More specifically, I think eastern cottonwood. Not very desirable near structures unless you’re really hard up for some shade. Really fast growing, not very strong, once dry the wood is pretty light, but green wood can have a bit of water weight to it. I suspect once you get a chance to count the rings you’ll find it closer to 30 years old, give or take. *edit * just re-read where you said you’ve been there 40+ years, so I guess my age estimate was a off. Looks like maybe 30” diameter in pics, but pics are hard to judge sometimes.


My vote would be remove it. I don’t much like cottonwoods, especially in range of a structure.



1200$ with all debris and wood hauled away, with the work performed by an insured professional would be a bit of a low price for my area, but we’re in very different parts of the country. That’s a nice price for the client I think.
 
Jed1124

Jed1124

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Your Tulip tree looks fine from here. $1200 is a great price to take it down, although pricing certainly varies with location.

I would not remove it unless there is a specific reason to do so.
 
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threeputt

threeputt

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That’s a poplar, but autocorrect seems to like “ popular “ more often lol.

More specifically, I think eastern cottonwood. Not very desirable near structures unless you’re really hard up for some shade. Really fast growing, not very strong, once dry the wood is pretty light, but green wood can have a bit of water weight to it. I suspect once you get a chance to count the rings you’ll find it closer to 30 years old, give or take. *edit * just re-read where you said you’ve been there 40+ years, so I guess my age estimate was a off. Looks like maybe 30” diameter in pics, but pics are hard to judge sometimes.


My vote would be remove it. I don’t much like cottonwoods, especially in range of a structure.



1200$ with all debris and wood hauled away, with the work performed by an insured professional would be a bit of a low price for my area, but we’re in very different parts of the country. That’s a nice price for the client I think.
Its at little over 9 foot around at the base which would make around 3 foot in diameter I think. I thought I typed in poplar but I really didn't check after I posted but anyway it was corrected.
I have pictures of our back yard made 35 years ago and it was indeed large then. I have always called it a poplar . After I posted I see its also called Tulip tree or yellow poplar.
This tree also looks like this picture in spring .
I guess because of all the storms we have had in the last few years I feared it might fall on the house but from what I read if the winds are strong enough to uproot this tree its going to destroy the home anyway.
I probably will just let it be. Hasn't fell in 48 years so why worry now.
 

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threeputt

threeputt

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Your Tulip tree looks fine from here. $1200 is a great price to take it down, although pricing certainly varies with location.

I would not remove it unless there is a specific reason to do so.
Thanks, I will just leave it be, I think :)
 
kenmbz

kenmbz

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I have quite a few of these.
When they have a problem, it is usually obvious.
Only one I had to take out had a lightening strike.
When cut, only a little bit of the struck side was weak. Probably would have stood for another decade or more.
Most of mine are in the 50+ year range, so they age well.
 
threeputt

threeputt

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I have quite a few of these.
When they have a problem, it is usually obvious.
Only one I had to take out had a lightening strike.
When cut, only a little bit of the struck side was weak. Probably would have stood for another decade or more.
Most of mine are in the 50+ year range, so they age well.
That makes me feel much better, for now :)
 
Dangerous

Dangerous

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Its at little over 9 foot around at the base which would make around 3 foot in diameter I think. I thought I typed in poplar but I really didn't check after I posted but anyway it was corrected.
I have pictures of our back yard made 35 years ago and it was indeed large then. I have always called it a poplar . After I posted I see its also called Tulip tree or yellow poplar.
This tree also looks like this picture in spring .
I guess because of all the storms we have had in the last few years I feared it might fall on the house but from what I read if the winds are strong enough to uproot this tree its going to destroy the home anyway.
I probably will just let it be. Hasn't fell in 48 years so why worry now.
Check with the Insurance Company that insures your house . If it drops on your house be sure that the insurance company will pay for temporary housing and repairs to the house. If the tree is 1/3 dead it’s on the way out if it’ sheds Widow maker branches limbs it’s a hazard I would remove it . If you can sleep and are not afraid of it let it be.
Be sure the insurance will cover if it falls on the house.
Good Luck.
 

AKoz

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And to make it more confusing it is part of the Magnolia family of trees.
I have lots of these on my 4 acres in NJ.

I have never had an otherwise healthy looking one break off at the lower truck and fall over, nor have I seen one uproot, so I would say keep it. What does seem to happen is the wind may shear off the top if it sticks way above the surround canopies. In that case the top tends to fall near the trunk, so even that should not be an issue for your house. After this happens a new leader is established and the tree does fine.

The main reason I take some down is they grow faster and taller than many other trees and thus win the race for sunlight. I cut some down because they shade out other desirable trees. The trick is to decide early on whether you like where one is because they grow so fast that in 10 - 20 years, dropping it yourself is no small matter depending if it close to something valuable. I wish I had heeded this advice many years ago.

They are thought of as pest and disease resistant and I agree with that. But one problem I have with them is that they can get infested with aphids. The aphid feeds on the leaves and excretes what aphids excrete. The trees' health does not seem to be threatened but this excrement leaves like a black soot type coating under the trees. It is unsightly on cars and walks . The excrement also is a challenge for plants growing under it. Most plants under an infested tree don't die but they do seem to struggle. The aphid can be treated with pesticides but I have too many trees to bother. Even so they are a desirable tree.
 
threeputt

threeputt

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Check with the Insurance Company that insures your house . If it drops on your house be sure that the insurance company will pay for temporary housing and repairs to the house. If the tree is 1/3 dead it’s on the way out if it’ sheds Widow maker branches limbs it’s a hazard I would remove it . If you can sleep and are not afraid of it let it be.
Be sure the insurance will cover if it falls on the house.
Good Luck.
I will check with Insurance tomorrow. I am 99% sure the insurance would cover it though. We had straight line winds last year that took a few limbs off this tree and they ended up on the other side of the house but never any fall for no reason. Its just been on my mind and I have noticed how tall it is when I come in the driveway. I am still thinking about getting it cut. I may see if I can get someone who knows more than me to take a look soon.
 
Billhook

Billhook

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My father planted a lot of Poplar here in the UK in 1960s, when there was a grant from the government to help the match industry Bryant and May. He told me that when the Millenium came round I would be a rich man.
When it did come round most people had packed up smoking and those that still did used butane lighters.
So I had a lot of trees looking for a home. A chance meeting with a guy from Oregon came up with a story of a Church there made of poplar that was 120 years old and still going strong, built in log cabin style.
I contacted Dan Franklin from Woodenways and went on a course and the result is shown in two pictures here, number one and number three with the swans on the lake.
The cabin was built in 2001 and we put the base a couple of feet off the ground set on six large sandstone boulders as poplar on the ground rots in no time. So twenty years later and no sign of rot. Cut the floor and rafters with a Lucas Mill but the 40 poplar logs were put together with the old full scribe method, using old tools, mainly axes and draw knives and scribers.
Not a nail in the walls.
My father was always thinking of my future bless him and the other things he planted were a load of pine trees for pit props in the coal mining industry, of which the was still a fair amount in the `1950s, but come the Millenium,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,!!
I do not think that there is one pit left here today. But planning for the future with tree planting is very fickle.
 
Urbicide

Urbicide

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Never inform the insurance company about a potential problem on your property.
I agree. If a tree falls during a storm, it is considered an act of God. If you are inquiring about a specific potential problem tree, then that takes God out of the equation. It makes you liable, since you are aware of a potential issue that existed & did not act upon it before hand. If you have a neighbor with a potentially hazardous tree, & the tree falls on your fence, car, house, etc., that falls under the Act of God, & you and your own insurance company have to deal with it. However, if your neighbor is made ware of the fact, & fails to act accordingly, then they are on the hook. For this, you would have to be able to prove that they were informed, in court if necessary. Of course, if they don't have insurance, they probably won't have the cash, & you will end up having to file a claim with your own insurance provider.
 
Dangerous

Dangerous

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I agree. If a tree falls during a storm, it is considered an act of God. If you are inquiring about a specific potential problem tree, then that takes God out of the equation. It makes you liable, since you are aware of a potential issue that existed & did not act upon it before hand. If you have a neighbor with a potentially hazardous tree, & the tree falls on your fence, car, house, etc., that falls under the Act of God, & you and your own insurance company have to deal with it. However, if your neighbor is made ware of the fact, & fails to act accordingly, then they are on the hook. For this, you would have to be able to prove that they were informed, in court if necessary. Of course, if they don't have insurance, they probably won't have the cash, & you will end up having to file a claim with your own insurance provider.
Often the insurance seller is an Independant agent and will answer general questions after all you are his customer he can give his candid opinion.
But to contact the insurance company proper might be a mistake as others have pointed out.
 
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lwmibc

lwmibc

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Had one near the house on the place I owned from 1976 to 2004 in the Fraser Valley in BC; never gave it a second thought as to it being dangerous, a solid well-rooted tree. It was fairly mature when I bought the place, dated from around 1953 from the lot survey history. It's still there and doing just fine, last I checked.

https://plants.ces.ncsu.edu › plants › liriodendron-tulipifera
 
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