Problems with smoke from neighbor's burn pit

LoveStihlQuality

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their not going to,,and they have already proved it.. and from what you said,,the old man is pw...you do what you want,,but id burn that hateful female...shes do a good lesson in humility...seeing her hauled off to jail,,id laugh as she was driven away....probably has gotten her snide way all her life...as one said,,shes a wack job..and I wouldn't put it past her,,to burn your bldg. to the ground.....to bad you don't have a lot of vids,,and the accompanying sound........just her loud mouth,,would land her in the pokey,,for threatening you.....
If she went to jail, doubt her husband would bail her out

LoveStihlQuality
 

Streblerm

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Another quiet week. I haven't seen the dude around for a couple weeks. Maybe he got smart and realized nothing was good enough to put up with that kind of crazy. The trash is building up around the house. That's fine with me as long as they aren't burning it.

I wonder if the last time the police were there they might've said something like "next time we are called out here someone is going to jail and it likely won't be the guys at the business next door."

Other than them moving this is about the best possible outcome. I hope things stay quiet.
 
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OP as a bee keeper my self I will tell you that those can be removed by a experienced bee keeper not killed. The method is called a trap out some times a cut out, it does take a bit of time to do the job.
Basically you find the bees entrance and set up a cone they will be able to come out of their hive but can't for some strange reason find the way back in. You set a hive close for them to use at night which will get fuller and fuller every day.



I my self use a 5 frame nuc box rather than a 10 frame hive and change the nuc as it fills up. After a while when no bees are bringing any more food into the hive the queen will some times come out but most times she just starves to death. Once no more bees are coming out you can take the set up down and plug the entrance they used to get in the building.



Now a good bee keeper will charge for this, you have to do the set up and change the hives out from time to time. Equipment is tied up in the operation.

My self if they are not bothering any one and you are not forced to get rid of the bees due to some state, county or city law I would leave then alone.
Good luck with your problem I feel for you and all the stress of having to deal with that type of person/people.

:D Al

If the queen starves to death, how is the hive viable? Sorry for the derail.
 

alleyyooper

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No they do not flock to the new queen and hive. In fact I will not even install a queen in the catch hive for at least a week depending on the weather.
The workers only go to the catch hive because they can not find the opening to the tree, building/home.
that is why you set the catch hive so close to the entrance of where the bees are you want to trap out.
Also keep in mind a worker bee only lives about 6 weeks in the summer because they wear out their wings.

:D Al
 

CentaurG2

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If the queen starves to death, how is the hive viable? Sorry for the derail.
Honey bees are chemically driven by pheromones. If a queen dies, the worker bees will literally build a new one. They will also build queens if they feel the hive has gotten too big. The new queen will take off with about half the hive workers (swarm) and settle in whatever shelter they can find.
 
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Honey bees are chemically driven by pheromones. If a queen dies, the worker bees will literally build a new one. They will also build queens if they feel the hive has gotten too big. The new queen will take off with about half the hive workers (swarm) and settle in whatever shelter they can find.
Kinda sounds like chainsaw forums ;)
 

alleyyooper

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The swarm first of the year from a hive. The workers make up queen cells many of them. It takes nearly a month for the egg in the queen cell to develop, about 10 days before the cell hatches the workers stop feeding the old queen as much food to slim her down for flight. Yes the first swarm from a hive is lead by the OLD queen. After swarms will have a new young queen in them. Since the old queen has not flown since her last mating flight she tires quickly and will land some place. the workers and drones will cluster around her to protect her. Scouts are then sent out to find a new suitable home. Once a scout returns and tells of their findings a group is sent to check it out also. The group returns and tells yes they have found a new home so they fly off to the location. This can take from a couple of hours to several days and some times they never do find a suitable home and will build the comb where ever they are all summer.





If you see one of these do not spray it or kill it. Do a goggle search for a bee keeper in your state to call and come get them.
My grand daughter will tell you they are pretty harmless if left alone.



Sorry I did not mean to side track your post. I was just wanting to point out there is a way to remove the bees from your building. I also wanted to clear up false information others have posted.

:D Al
 
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I threw you a like for the data even though I would never let kids close to that!

At least real bees don't go back to the old hive to spread defication around before they get "zapped" lol. Sorry had to say it.
 

unclemoustache

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Had a swarm of honeybees in a tree that a local tree service cut down. It took a lot of phone calls, but I was able to track down a bee guy to come and get them. The log was loaded (carefully) onto my trailer, and sat there for a few days until the bee guy could come with his truck. We cut the log small enough so we could get it onto his truck, and he hauled it all away. He left it in a field until it was warm enough and plants were up enough to move them to the boxes. I should call him up and ask how that went. Hopefully the hive survived all that.
 

Streblerm

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The hive remains undisturbed. I'm certain that the day the neighbors were freaked the hive was swarming. It was one of the first really warm days in spring. Before the neighbor incident I was inclined to let them alone, now even more so.

A little update. Apparently they have taken my advice about not burning during business hours but the FD is not nearly as flexible as I am. There was a blurb on the local police blotter about a " house fire" next to our shop. Well, their's is the only house near us. There were flames two stories high. The house is still standing so I can only assume they had a big old trash fire that the FD came and put out.
 

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