Project Saw Questions

Courage

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Hey guys, I have two more questions for you all. First, I would like to learn more about working on saws. I learn best hands on, so I thought that maybe I should get a non running saw to rebuild. Does that seem like a good idea? Is rebuilding a saw something that is reasonable for a beginner to learn to do through YouTube University and of course forums like this one for if I get stumped? I found a pretty nice looking 036 Pro for sale for $300 obo that doesn't run. He says that he took it to a shop and they told him that the cylinder and piston is scratched. "I used to be able to run it but now I can’t start it but seams to have good compression" is what he told me when I messaged him. Does that seem like a good deal? I've heard of some guys just honying the original cylinder and then putting a new piston and rings on which doesn't look to hard. I know that none of you would know for sure, but does that sound like what this saw needs? Here's a link to it with some pictures. https://spokane.craigslist.org/grd/d/rathdrum-stihl-pro-036-chainsaw/7423736279.html
Now onto my second question... What are good prices for non running, good condition saws that are common? The ones that I have seen so far have been an 026 Pro ($75 which I tried to buy but sold first), MS250($50), and this 036Pro($300 obo). Are those good prices? If someone has a list of common saw and good non running prices I'd really appreciate it! I don't need that many saws, so I might flip a few... Like I have said before, I look at anything that is Stihl, Husky, or Jonsered (hopefully I spelled that one correctly 🤣). I'm not stuck on Stihl, but there just aren't that many other brands for sale in this area that aren't home owner models. I check Facebook marketplace and craigslist every day, and that's just what I have observed. I look forward to hearing from you all!
Courage
 

lostone

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While it's a good saw I wouldn't pay that for a saw that needs a new piston and cylinder. Different areas are going to determine the value of the saw but even in my area where there aren't many choices I still wouldn't pay more than $225 for it and that's only if the rest of the saw was in really good condition. As far as what's wrong with it well there's no real way anyone can say until you get your hands on it and do some testing or teardown on it.
 

irhunter

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Locally, I can get occasional project pro/semi-pro saws for $100, or less. Most need just a piston and rubber parts; some, only need the rubber parts.

I think the OP's idea of learning saw rebuilding by just buying a builder and having at it is a good idea. Watch a few vids, get the shop manual, buy a pressure/vac tester, ask a few questions here, rebuild saw.
 
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The 036 is way overpriced based on the description. Not sure I'd pay $300 for a running 036, if so that would be my limit.
I would have snagged a 026 that wasn't running for $75, if the chassis was in good shape. I'd pass on the MS250 as I don't like working on clamshell saws.
I'd suggest spending some time reading the "You Suck" as that will give you a better idea as to what people are finding and what price they are paying.
 

Yukon Stihl

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I would concentrate on the 024
by the sounds of it you need to buy a few tools if you are going to look at rebuilding a saw.
Put an add in your local paper clist looking for dead saws,you will end up with a bunch of free ones,and maybe a good saw or two,if really lucky you will be able to post in the suck thread.
 

J D

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It's really hard to estimate a saws value without a proper hands on, even if it's a runner... however if you know the piston is toast you'd want to factor in the cost of a decent replacement cylinder & piston & potentially seals or carb/intake if that was the cause.
I'd suggest getting to know your local small engine repairers, do the rounds & let them know what you're interested in tinkering with. You'll likely find you can get your hands on half a dozen cheap saws with interchangeable parts to play with & learn... if you're lucky you might find something decent that just needs more time than money spent on it. A box of doughnuts or pack of bickies tends to go a long way ;)
 

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