Proper file size for a chain dosent work

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chuckinnc

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Have 2 saws I bought new, the manual says:
62 link, 3/8" pitch, 0.05" gauge. use 5/32 file
But I cant sharpen the chains, the file seems to fit ok into the curve or hook but barely touches to top of the teeth where the cutting edge is, am I missing something, shouldnt a round file sharpen the top/lip not just the curved part.
 

cscltd

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about 20% of file should be above cutter, however if you are not using a file guide the file may not stay at that height and may be below the top as file will rest on bottom of cutter
 
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Have 2 saws I bought new, the manual says:
62 link, 3/8" pitch, 0.05" gauge. use 5/32 file
But I cant sharpen the chains, the file seems to fit ok into the curve or hook but barely touches to top of the teeth where the cutting edge is, am I missing something, shouldnt a round file sharpen the top/lip not just the curved part.
5/32" file is for 3/8 picco/lo pro

For regular 3/8 use 7/32" , or 13/64" if Stihl chain

What saw are you using?
 

thenne1713

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Have 2 saws I bought new, the manual says:
62 link, 3/8" pitch, 0.05" gauge. use 5/32 file
But I cant sharpen the chains, the file seems to fit ok into the curve or hook but barely touches to top of the teeth where the cutting edge is, am I missing something, shouldnt a round file sharpen the top/lip not just the curved part.
FIRST= CHAIN SIZE? 3/8" or (3/8-LP= Low Profile= pico). MOST HOMEOWNER SAWS are LP chain. 3/8= 7/32 file, 325= 3/16 file and 3/8LP= 5/32" file, BUT 2nd = (Minimum) YOU NEED A FILE GUIDE. File snaps into it to keep 20% of file above top of cutter, then you need SMALL FLAT FILE AND DEPTH GAGE TOOL (You can (usually) get ALL in WM Garden area for $5-$10/each) or BEST= 2-IN1-FILE that files CUTTER AND DEPTH GAGE AT THE SAME TIME/ SAME STROKE IF YOU APPLY PROPER PRESSURE. VERIFY YOUR CHAIN SIZE AND FILE? https://www.ebay.com/itm/3636061376...1291&msclkid=7946dc7963b31976ea18bdf6381ece0f
 

peteduncan

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Have 2 saws I bought new, the manual says:
62 link, 3/8" pitch, 0.05" gauge. use 5/32 file
But I cant sharpen the chains, the file seems to fit ok into the curve or hook but barely touches to top of the teeth where the cutting edge is, am I missing something, shouldnt a round file sharpen the top/lip not just the curved part.
I have to agree with the others who mention the benefit of file guides, although I resisted them for a long time. I used to always sharpen freehand, with the appropriately sized file, but with mixed results. I eventually decided that I was sometimes filing the tooth gullet with too much downward pressure. That can lead to undercutting the tooth edge. If the file is working too far BELOW the cutting edge, then it is not sharpening the edge.

Since I started using a file guide, which keeps the file at the proper depth, I get better and more consistent results. The flat plates of the guide slide over the chain tooth, holding the file at a better height for sharpening the tooth edge. I use the Oregon file guide (25894), but I haven't tried any of the other types out there.
 

TheJollyLogger

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for a new chain filer I have to say that semi new Stihl filer is absolutely the best way to get great results. I always freehand, but that is a skill that takes a lot of time to master, and I had the benefit of having a grinder to true it back up when needed. For a homeowner I really like that stihl system.
 

Cynfawr

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Second vote for the Stihl combi files, they really simplify the process. Easiest way to do a decent job in the field.
 

thenne1713

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Have 2 saws I bought new, the manual says:
62 link, 3/8" pitch, 0.05" gauge. use 5/32 file
But I cant sharpen the chains, the file seems to fit ok into the curve or hook but barely touches to top of the teeth where the cutting edge is, am I missing something, shouldnt a round file sharpen the top/lip not just the curved part.
FYI, FREEHAND sharpening is Tough for most, even experienced, and EASY to mess up; the simplest jigs raise/ hold the file to the recommended 20% (1/5) of file ABOVE the top of the cutter.
 

MesquiteFreak

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I have tried and hate the 5/32 file, it's week and flimsy. Bucking billy ray on one of his youtube videos he said he uses 3/16 file for the 3/8 low pro chain and always has and to try it. Since I started using the 3/16 file I have been doing a great job filing in My opinion. If you go to.his home page on youtube you can go to playlist and he has a whole play list dedicated to chain filing. Remember GET THE GULLET and to get a raker gauge and the best way to learn is to get that file cuttin metal and gain experience. I haven't been handle filing that long, I have never used a file guide but check the cutters angles. I have a great time doing, i feel confident enough to touch up my chain at work and I haven't had a chain that cuts crooked yet. Good luck give the 3/16
 

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You should be worried about cutting yourself on a freshly sharpened chain, simply put if this is not a concern your not going to get good results.
You can file all you want out of the side plate but if your corner isn't sharp it won't make a difference.
The stihl file guides are well designed for the novice chain sharpeners. If you dirt, rock ,or find metal in a tree the guides are very useful to restore a chain back to sharp.
 

Huskybill

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Have 2 saws I bought new, the manual says:
62 link, 3/8" pitch, 0.05" gauge. use 5/32 file
But I cant sharpen the chains, the file seems to fit ok into the curve or hook but barely touches to top of the teeth where the cutting edge is, am I missing something, shouldnt a round file sharpen the top/lip not just the curved part.
I do the gullet with the smaller size file first free hand.. Then I use the file n guide next doing the upper edge cutter.
 

Huskybill

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On new chain say 3/8” the 7/32” file won’t fit, go smaller till the file fits then file the gullet under the cutting to the top of the link above the rivet.
 

thenne1713

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Thanks, I need to buy a guide, I have 2 Greenworks 80 volt 18" chainsaws. The chain & file info was from their manual
Proper FILE position on the cutting edge is 10% of file ABOVE THE CUTTER top, and the DEPTH GAGE 0.025" BELOW. The battery saws would use 3/8-LP chain, or the SHORT bar 8"-12" saw might use the 1/4"/.25 chain like the pole pruners, and the low-voltage battery saws (12-24-volt?). and if YOU THINK YOU CAN freehand depth and end up w/ 0.025 and not be herky-jerky and dangerous, you mighta had too many beers and be the redneck that shows grinding depth gages on youtube freehand w/ a side grinder? LOL :) (I repeat) get the 2 in 1 :)
 

Philbert

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6DCFB0DB-357C-42B1-B1C7-D387FAC821DC.jpeg

This is Oregon’s recommendation. Using the specified diameter file, at this height, produces the recommended top plate cutting bevel (red line).

Guides that support the file in this position, from above or below, will provide more consistent cutters for most users.

If someone intentionally desires a different angle, that is their choice, but they ought to produce it consistently on each cutter.

Some guys get obsessed with the gullets. They need to be maintained, but it is the top plate edge, and side plate edge (along with the corner where they meet) that do the cutting.

The depth gauge determines how much of those edges will actually bite into the wood.

Philbert
 

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