Remote control tree removal

Philbert

Philbert

Chainsaw Enthusiast
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Nov 25, 2006
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18,415
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Minnesota
When you say that you work alone on these removals, does that mean that you don't even have a ground crew to spot or to keep people away? How about cleaning up the limbs, leaves, and trunks once on the ground - who limbs/bucks/loads/chips them?

Thanks.

Philbert
 
sgreanbeans

sgreanbeans

Treeaculterologist
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May 4, 2001
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iowa
I hear you brother. I was so happy Sunday when temps went to the upper 20s. I never work when it's below 15. It's just one problem after the other. I've run my remote control stump grinder from my cab, but I wouldn't do it with this.
Its pretty sad when ya get excited about upper 20's! 40's would be like a warm summer day at this point!
 
Gerasimek

Gerasimek

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When you say that you work alone on these removals, does that mean that you don't even have a ground crew to spot or to keep people away? How about cleaning up the limbs, leaves, and trunks once on the ground - who limbs/bucks/loads/chips them?

Thanks.

Philbert
When I'm on the job by myself and it's a normal size tree, I'm usually chatting with whoever's watching outside the work zone. Seriously. I'm not kidding. When I need cleanup I hire a guy. If it's a tight area, he's there standing by the chipper watching as I bring the limbs down and feed them right into the chipper. Then he rakes up by the chipper (that's the only place that needs raked up) ,leaves and comes back with a dump truck, and I load the wood right into it. On some jobs the tree is never touched by hand and never touches the ground. Other services like me take the tree down while they're on another job. I text them when I'm done and they roll in and clean up. Limbs are stacked facing where the chipper will be and logs are in a pile. This way their guys are never idle. It enables them to bang out jobs like crazy. Normally, you have crane operator, climber or bucket guy, and a couple guys standing around waiting for limbs to get lowered. There are so many scenarios.
 
luckydad

luckydad

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When I'm on the job by myself and it's a normal size tree, I'm usually chatting with whoever's watching outside the work zone. Seriously. I'm not kidding. When I need cleanup I hire a guy. If it's a tight area, he's there standing by the chipper watching as I bring the limbs down and feed them right into the chipper. Then he rakes up by the chipper (that's the only place that needs raked up) ,leaves and comes back with a dump truck, and I load the wood right into it. On some jobs the tree is never touched by hand and never touches the ground. Other services like me take the tree down while they're on another job. I text them when I'm done and they roll in and clean up. Limbs are stacked facing where the chipper will be and logs are in a pile. This way their guys are never idle. It enables them to bang out jobs like crazy. Normally, you have crane operator, climber or bucket guy, and a couple guys standing around waiting for limbs to get lowered. There are so many scenarios.
How do you get your Kboom and your chip truck/chipper to the job all by your self ??
 
mattfr12

mattfr12

The Bulldog
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Nov 24, 2007
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Pennsylvania
We use a geirking grapple I think I spelled it wrong. we been messing with this idea for about a year. We can do around 1100 pounds at 70ft.

There are limitations! We have been screwing with this and are now in the process of mounting a fpv camera somewhere near the saw head so we can see what we are grabing. And to also match up cuts to get the full use of the bar.

Total rig cost would be around 190k with saw head.

This will never replace a bucket or climber in all scenarios. It works best on vertical lead trees. The more horizontal the limb the more a pain in the ass.

The one we are gonna be doing some screwing around with requires 4 circuits and need no modification to be added to most kbooms and cranes that can already run a rotating grapple.

on a cut and leave job it doesn't shine for me. Some removals are faster. It shines for smaller operations with less employees as in alot instances I can put a tree on the ground 50% faster by climbing.

Tight removals tho it kicks ass. Keep in mind most removals you will be done around 15- 60ft of height left depending in size of wood.
 
Gerasimek

Gerasimek

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Jan 20, 2008
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Western PA
We use a geirking grapple I think I spelled it wrong. we been messing with this idea for about a year. We can do around 1100 pounds at 70ft.

There are limitations! We have been screwing with this and are now in the process of mounting a fpv camera somewhere near the saw head so we can see what we are grabing. And to also match up cuts to get the full use of the bar.

Total rig cost would be around 190k with saw head.

This will never replace a bucket or climber in all scenarios. It works best on vertical lead trees. The more horizontal the limb the more a pain in the ass.

The one we are gonna be doing some screwing around with requires 4 circuits and need no modification to be added to most kbooms and cranes that can already run a rotating grapple.

on a cut and leave job it doesn't shine for me. Some removals are faster. It shines for smaller operations with less employees as in alot instances I can put a tree on the ground 50% faster by climbing.

Tight removals tho it kicks ass. Keep in mind most removals you will be done around 15- 60ft of height left depending in size of wood.

After reading your post, I am very glad that I bought the Mecanil!
I've done trees of all shapes and sizes and the only trees that it doesn't work well on are super thick trees like pines. (It works on tall skinny pines or pines with multiple leads, just not super thick ones).
Do you do cut and leave jobs by yourself or do you have an employee there with you in case something happens while you're aloft, for safety?
I have to ask, do you have a jib? It makes a huge difference. I ran my Mecanil on a smaller crane without a jib for the first year and decided a jib would be ideal. I was right. I love my new setup.
 
Gerasimek

Gerasimek

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How do you get your Kboom and your chip truck/chipper to the job all by your self ??
Magic!
No, I said when I need clean up I call in my 1 awesome employee. I have plenty of work to keep him busy but I'm starting to do more work for other services. I decided to help him start his own business so he and I can both earn more money. I won't have to pay workers comp or worry about keeping him busy. I do less physical labor. I have more freedom to enjoy my life. You see where all this is going? It's about being truly 'self' employed. It's freedom. Less headaches. Self reliance. It's working out for me.
 
Gerasimek

Gerasimek

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Mattfr12,
After seeing your website I see you don't have a jib. Your kboom is similar in size to the one I used to own. Having a jib allows you to get the full potential out of your grapplesaw. It allows you to grab where you want instead of where you can.
I live an hour and a half North of you. If you ever want to stop and see mine, your welcome to.
 
Gerasimek

Gerasimek

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Western PA
We are using a truck with fly jib on it to test the truck.
I went from using a 40' kboom to a 95' with the fly jib and it eliminated any height restriction while also opening up many scenarios with its side reach. I seldom use my mini loader any more because I can reach 84' out. You'll love it.
 

ATH

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Saw one of these leaving Tiffin Palfinger today. Pulled out right in front of me. When they got into a left turn lane at the next light up, I pulled up next to them in the straight lane checking out the saw head/grapple sitting on the flatbed... Smaller unit than I expected it to be. I don't remember the numbers on the crane.
 
Gerasimek

Gerasimek

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Saw one of these leaving Tiffin Palfinger today. Pulled out right in front of me. When they got into a left turn lane at the next light up, I pulled up next to them in the straight lane checking out the saw head/grapple sitting on the flatbed... Smaller unit than I expected it to be. I don't remember the numbers on the crane.
There are now 15 tree-meks built by Tiffin in operation around the country and several more in production. They're going to be everywhere in a few years. Check them out on Instagram. (#treemek, #palfleet)
 
WillyStDruid

WillyStDruid

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Madison, WI
In the event that you were so greedy and impatient as to cut off a piece that was too big, you could simply open the grapple and let it go.
I've done some trees that were growing in an area where I could just grab, cut, and let go ,not having to worry about how they fell.
Most often I grab, cut, and set the piece either on the deck of the chipper (if it's a limb) or right into a truck bed (if it's a chunk of wood. I even feed the chipper with it. No ropes, no dragging limbs, no mini loader or machine to move logs, no dents in the yard, and the only area that needs raked up is where you're chipping. You can't imagine the time saved. It's why I have only 1 guy, that used to be my employee, cleaning up. I subcontract his little business and I don't have to pay workman's comp. All he owns is a truck, chipper, and a rake.
The thing on the bed is a man basket. It stows in a custom made bracket (which I can remove from the bed if I need space to haul anything up to 14'). I sold my 75' elevator so I needed to have some means of getting myself up for certain situations that the grapplesaw doesn't like (pruning and thick bushy trees like pines). Every piece of equipment has limitations but the grapplesaw has only a couple and having the basket covers them. I seldom use the basket.
Those were good questions.

Any video of the bucket in action?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
robertdk

robertdk

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Jelling
There are now 15 tree-meks built by Tiffin in operation around the country and several more in production. They're going to be everywhere in a few years. Check them out on Instagram. (#treemek, #palfleet)

Hi Glenn Gerasimek

This treemek operation means that opreators have to look up skyhigh a relatively great part of their workday bending their necks in a un-natural way. I know people in forest busniesses (forest rangers inspecting treetops) that have discus prolapses in the neck region probably from overuse of this bodypart. Do you have some experience with this or some thoughts in relation to 'treemek' work.?
 
Gerasimek

Gerasimek

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Hi Glenn Gerasimek

This treemek operation means that opreators have to look up skyhigh a relatively great part of their workday bending their necks in a un-natural way. I know people in forest busniesses (forest rangers inspecting treetops) that have discus prolapses in the neck region probably from overuse of this bodypart. Do you have some experience with this or some thoughts in relation to 'treemek' work.?
That's a good question.
As with any type of work there is risk of injury from posture and overuse. 99% of the guys that have called me to inquire about the tree-mek have injuries from climbing.
Sure, I have to look up. It's rarely straight up and it's usually only for the very top of the tree, though. It's better to work on an angle and stand further away and better yet, to stand on a roof (if you're working near one.
As with everything, it's all about limiting your time doing one thing and finding other activities that counter the effects of that thing.
I'm glad you asked that question as that is one of the main reasons that I pursued the tree-mek. Your health is everything and the effects of climbing and bucket work, no matter how you do it, will catch up with you even if you never have a mishap or accident.
 
Gerasimek

Gerasimek

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There are now 15 tree-meks built by Tiffin in operation around the country and several more in production. They're going to be everywhere in a few years. Check them out on Instagram. (#treemek, #palfleet)
There are now just under 50 tree-meks that have been built by Tiffin Palfleet in operation all over the US.
It's happening even faster than I thought it would.
It's like when man first saw a rifle and dropped his bow. (Is that a good analogy, or what?)
 
Gerasimek

Gerasimek

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Hi Glenn Gerasimek

This treemek operation means that opreators have to look up skyhigh a relatively great part of their workday bending their necks in a un-natural way. I know people in forest busniesses (forest rangers inspecting treetops) that have discus prolapses in the neck region probably from overuse of this bodypart. Do you have some experience with this or some thoughts in relation to 'treemek' work.?
Also, the tree-mek has afforded me many luxuries, the most important being time. Time to do things other than work. Another thing it has afforded me is energy after work to use that time.
 
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