The Descriptive Process

catbuster

catbuster

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HyGard is good stuff, John Deere has good reason to be proud of it. The hydraulic oil in bulk we had on hand at the shop was Mobil ISO 46, and it worked very well for us. I think Case HyTran is probably the best oil available, and it’s in the $100/5 gallon price

On the ORB Walsh surprisingly kept very little on site, but what they kept was Cat Hydo, which was about $100/5 gallon pail. Kokosing built their temporary shop facility at CVG with an intermodal tank full of hydraulic oil. I was blown away, but I was blown away by a lot of things on that site.
 
NorthernMaverick

NorthernMaverick

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The War Dept, has informed me that a flock of Camp Robbers (grey jays) has found the neighborhood... Guess I have to start locking the doors on the crummy and log truck... and keep all my TP, lighters, spare gloves under lock and key...
I kind of missed the joke. Im not from the PNW, is there a way to explain?
 
rwoods

rwoods

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I am told those high dollar branded oils are chock full of vitamins and minerals not found in the generic stuff. I read they are better for clutches and brakes among other things. I run Hy-Gard in my tractor. At the end of the day, the dozer isn't mine and they were happy with Mag 1. I guess that some oil is better than no oil.

Ron
 
northmanlogging

northmanlogging

The gyppo's gyppo
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western washington
I kind of missed the joke. Im not from the PNW, is there a way to explain?
ironically they were stealing the semi feral cats food this morning...

the story is that Grey Jays "camp robbers" are the ghosts of dead loggers, they are mischievous, fearless, and will pick up anything that looks even remotely valuable and hide it from you, not necessarily in their nest, just where you will never ever find it, there is almost always a group of 3 or more 2 to create mayhem, 1 for a look out, if there is more then 3 there is almost always a leader (the real trouble maker)

They are not large birds, littel bigger then a standard robin, soft grey with white patches and in winter have an almost fuzzy appearance, they are friendly even in the wildest of wildernesses, which is just a trick to get close to you and steal your gloves. The will work with "blue" jays i.e. Steller's Jays, but probably only as a long game con to get their vote and take over their feeding spots.
 
catbuster

catbuster

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I am told those high dollar branded oils are chock full of vitamins and minerals not found in the generic stuff. I read they are better for clutches and brakes among other things. I run Hy-Gard in my tractor. At the end of the day, the dozer isn't mine and they were happy with Mag 1. I guess that some oil is better than no oil.

Ron

HyTran & HyGard are meant specifically to be easy on clutches in powershift transmissions, the neighbor at home smoked the clutch packs in his 4240 and 4450 running cheap oil through the 12/4 transmissions in them. He went back to HyGard afterwards.

Hydo is great if you like extended service intervals and is easy on clutches and brakes in powershift dozers. I believe Cat recommends a different oil for transmissions (TDTO?) but you know how that goes-good 10W sometimes is just good 10W. They have a great guide on what oil to use where and when that’s available as a free PDF.

The Mobil AW46/SAE 10 treated us well, but it was also a fairly expensive oil. It helped that I could get it through the same supplier I got Delvac, Super-Moly and diesel through. I think when, or maybe if, I get going again I’ll probably stick with OEM, but I’ll probably run exclusively Caterpillar & Case, which makes life a lot easier.
 
NorthernMaverick

NorthernMaverick

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ironically they were stealing the semi feral cats food this morning...

the story is that Grey Jays "camp robbers" are the ghosts of dead loggers, they are mischievous, fearless, and will pick up anything that looks even remotely valuable and hide it from you, not necessarily in their nest, just where you will never ever find it, there is almost always a group of 3 or more 2 to create mayhem, 1 for a look out, if there is more then 3 there is almost always a leader (the real trouble maker)

They are not large birds, littel bigger then a standard robin, soft grey with white patches and in winter have an almost fuzzy appearance, they are friendly even in the wildest of wildernesses, which is just a trick to get close to you and steal your gloves. The will work with "blue" jays i.e. Steller's Jays, but probably only as a long game con to get their vote and take over their feeding spots.
Got it. Couldn't figure locking the truck from a bird, but now I get the ghost logger reference. 👍
 
rwoods

rwoods

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Interesting Day at the Range.

I cut out two more shooting lanes today. For every tree marked to be cut there seem to be at least one unmarked large dead tree that could fall within the lane. I ran several tanks through the 500i.

One day, I will learn that when something doesn't quite make sense you should stop and check things a bit before proceeding. I was trying to fell a 15" beech that had wrapped itself around a large red oak and the two were growing over each other. I cut it at shoulder height and tried to pop it free with wedges. O got it to move but it wouldn't fall. I then cut a slot between the two so I could get a choker around it, thinking I could bump it free with a couple of tugs with the pickup. Nope. I then cut the hinge completely free. Still very little action beyond sliding my truck off the road. As I was backing up to relieve the tension I hear a loud crack. Now why would it be cracking when the tension is being relieved. Don't know, but what the heck I relieve a little more tension. Another loud crack, but no movement in the tree. So I get out to investigate. T'wasn't the tree cracking. It was my rear tail lights against a small tree. Probably $100 thrown away. Swapped the truck for the dozer and took care of things.

Later in the day I have three marked trees to fall and one large dying poplar. The 500i runs out of fuel. Fuel is back at the truck so I get my favorite old McCulloch to finish the job. Next to last tree was one of those you could fairly easily fall any direction. I picked my preferred direction. Anyway, I was too slow on the draw with a wedge during the back cut and a slight puff of wind sending the tree backwards pinching my saw. Don't know why I made such a huge mistake - maybe fatigue or too lackadaisical because it was an easy tree. Given the nature of red oak, I didn't stand around. At a safe distance without any brilliant ideas for a rescue, I contemplated the eminent painful demise of my favorite MAC. In a few minutes the oak started a small chair on the face side. Within 15 minutes, it finished the job falling sideways and spinning in the air while taking by saw for a ride to the ground. Then with a big bounce the tree slammed to the ground again just inches from the power head. Fortunately, the MAC survived. The Stihl bar suffered almost a foot long pinch of the top rail.
IMG_6573.JPGIMG_6577.JPGIMG_6579.JPG
I haven't had but one big chair before - also red oak. It was on the back side as is typical. That was over 40 years ago.

Best part of the day was I didn't get hurt.

Ron
 
Gologit

Gologit

Completely retired...life is good.
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May 19, 2005
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16,384
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In the Redwoods.
Interesting Day at the Range.

I cut out two more shooting lanes today. For every tree marked to be cut there seem to be at least one unmarked large dead tree that could fall within the lane. I ran several tanks through the 500i.

One day, I will learn that when something doesn't quite make sense you should stop and check things a bit before proceeding. I was trying to fell a 15" beech that had wrapped itself around a large red oak and the two were growing over each other. I cut it at shoulder height and tried to pop it free with wedges. O got it to move but it wouldn't fall. I then cut a slot between the two so I could get a choker around it, thinking I could bump it free with a couple of tugs with the pickup. Nope. I then cut the hinge completely free. Still very little action beyond sliding my truck off the road. As I was backing up to relieve the tension I hear a loud crack. Now why would it be cracking when the tension is being relieved. Don't know, but what the heck I relieve a little more tension. Another loud crack, but no movement in the tree. So I get out to investigate. T'wasn't the tree cracking. It was my rear tail lights against a small tree. Probably $100 thrown away. Swapped the truck for the dozer and took care of things.

Later in the day I have three marked trees to fall and one large dying poplar. The 500i runs out of fuel. Fuel is back at the truck so I get my favorite old McCulloch to finish the job. Next to last tree was one of those you could fairly easily fall any direction. I picked my preferred direction. Anyway, I was too slow on the draw with a wedge during the back cut and a slight puff of wind sending the tree backwards pinching my saw. Don't know why I made such a huge mistake - maybe fatigue or too lackadaisical because it was an easy tree. Given the nature of red oak, I didn't stand around. At a safe distance without any brilliant ideas for a rescue, I contemplated the eminent painful demise of my favorite MAC. In a few minutes the oak started a small chair on the face side. Within 15 minutes, it finished the job falling sideways and spinning in the air while taking by saw for a ride to the ground. Then with a big bounce the tree slammed to the ground again just inches from the power head. Fortunately, the MAC survived. The Stihl bar suffered almost a foot long pinch of the top rail.
View attachment 944480View attachment 944478View attachment 944479
I haven't had but one big chair before - also red oak. It was on the back side as is typical. That was over 40 years ago.

Best part of the day was I didn't get hurt.

Ron
Some times the only thing that goes right is walking back in your own house at night on your own two feet.
Some times that's enough.
 
rwoods

rwoods

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Some times the only thing that goes right is walking back in your own house at night on your own two feet.
Some times that's enough.
Probably why circumstances let me into a white collar career. The odds of me lasting long working in the woods whether cutting or operating machinery don't seem too good. Between falling debris and flipping a machine just to name two hazards, I likely would not be around to talk about it. I am given to understand that you spent a long career doing both so you know well that just a moment of inattention with either can kill you.

Every close call gets me to thinking I should just quit while I can, but the lure keeps pulling me back for another round.

Ron
 

rwoods

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First Impressions ...

Tonight, my wife and I went to a nearby city to purchase a Christmas tree from the Boy Scouts. We made our selection and the adult in charge yelled to a young man, "Get over here! That thing ain't going to trim itself!" After seeing the boy struggle to crank the saw with the switch off, I stood back and pointed from a distance what branches to remove. Then I noticed him doing an undercut on a pinkie size branch before severing it from the top and I found myself thinking the boy has got some real potential.

HAPPY HOLIDAYS!
Ron
 
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