What You Should Do If You Get Hurt in the Woods When Alone

Huskybill

Huskybill

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
May 21, 2018
Messages
7,399
Location
Northeast
Cody threw a 32" chain yesterday that wrapped around his leg and hurt him enough to knock him to his knees. He was wearing wrap around chaps but the chain hit him on the back of his thigh. He immediately grabbed his leg and then checked his hands. No blood, just a strange bruise. He was a long ways from help.

I seen two Mack trucks, one trying to pull the other out of the plumbers trench at a new house. One was going in the wrong direction, snapped 3/8” chain. It whipped up and over the cab broke the windshield, landed on to the hood, each chain half link was imbedded in the steel cab and fiberglass nose. Probably the same bruise on skin.
 
  • Like
Reactions: TBS
2dogs

2dogs

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Sep 2, 2007
Messages
8,007
Location
Santa Cruz CA
A couple of good sources for med gear are Chinook Medical and LA Police Gear. The latter always has stuff on sale. If you are a business you will have to make sure your kits meet state and federal standards.
We have discussed this many times before but while you need (in my opinion) a large trauma kit in the crummy you should have a small pouch on your person with an Israeli dressing, a tourniquet, and a bite stick at all times. Mine is on my chaps belt but I also have a pouch on my Dolmar that is visible to everyone with the same items. I also stuff a couple cleansing wipes, band aids, Benadryl and Ibuprofen.
 
Huskybill

Huskybill

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
May 21, 2018
Messages
7,399
Location
Northeast
I operated with no cell phones were available at that time. Never thought about getting hurt. As time went on with experience, as I had close calls, I felled trees when I had people with me. I bucked them up and cut tops alone if I had too. Like I said before the first aid kit was in the truck with hospital heavy gause tape, steri strips, alcohol pads, rolls of gause, extra large pads, everything I needed if I got cut.

I think about it know on some jobs I was pretty deep in the forest. No one would hear me scream, I wonder if I could do s o s on a chain saw?
 
holeycow

holeycow

Dirt, Air, Water, Sun; Seeds.
Joined
Sep 9, 2011
Messages
4,456
Location
Canada
Helicopter used to drop us off in the morning and pick us up at the end of the day at a predetermined location. No communication with anyone. We made plans and stuck to the plan. IF we had radios, they were always dead at the end of the day. The first two-ways I ever used were "Marconi" brand...
 
Ted Jenkins

Ted Jenkins

Firewood by TJ
Joined
Apr 18, 2016
Messages
3,275
Location
Twin Peaks
There are many situations where you are just SOL. I am completely aware of that. For most part one can not carry all the stuff that one might need in a serious situation. I depend on duct tape which can close up a wound and stop bleeding. In many situations seconds count so you need to be programmed for the what if. Bleeding is not some thing that means a lot to me. Slipping on a wet log while breaking pelvis hip or? Not being able to crawl to the pickup or camp is a concern. I try to keep my SW emergency radio near. It will get out almost no matter what. It does have many channels and some emergency frequencies. It has a range of about 25 watt and 35 miles. The best first aid is your head. Even when I am anxious or in a hurry I have learned all work stops. I sit down and think about how little work will get done when I have to go to the ER room. Thanks
 
2dogs

2dogs

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Sep 2, 2007
Messages
8,007
Location
Santa Cruz CA
I was working with the inmate crew two weeks ago thinning a narrow strip between the road above and the trail below. The ground was steep and slippery but fairly open where we were. The sawyer was cutting a 6" fir that was leaning side hill, the puller was still passing the last tree to the chain. Another crew member tried to push the falling tree uphill but it was too heavy and fell towards him. Rather than let it go he kept pushing until the tree tore off the stump with the saw running and headed straight for his stomach! The saw stopped maybe 6" away from him! By the time I yelled it was all over and the crew was ready to chain the tree up to the road. I called the captain over and briefed him which made him check where the first aid kit was. It was back at the bus 200 yards back uphill! I grabbed mine and hung it on a stump above the road!
I "always" carry at least an Israeli dressing but this time I was marking trees and had my vest on. I had nothing on me if the crew member got cut. Times like this call for an operational pause. Bring everyone in and spend two minutes calling attention to OUR mistake.
 
Redgap

Redgap

ArboristSite Operative
Joined
Jun 12, 2012
Messages
112
Location
Minnesota and Idaho
I was doing some clearing by myself on some land out in the boonies, but a buddy said he’d be down from his cabin shortly after I got there. “Shortly after”...about 45 minutes later...a tree rolled over on my foot (another long story) and right up against my shin so I couldn’t sit up straight. Another couple inches and I’d have had some broken bones. My saw had been rolled over but was still running, and I hooked it with my cruiser axe and pulled it over, but I couldn’t get a shot at the tree without getting too close to my leg. Got my cell phone out and tried to call my buddy without success. Tried to call another cabin neighbor but the service was spotty. Finally he replied to a text, but he was miles away. I kept hoping someone would drive by on the remote gravel road slowly enough to see me. Eventually he called my buddy, and he and a neighbor couple showed up. Then more lessons. I told them to grab my spare saw (always bring one), but before the neighbor could start sawing me out, my buddy grabbed a chunk of wood and a stout branch to try to lever the tree off me...but would’ve levered it toward me...which would’ve crushed my foot and shin!! Finally the tree got cut, i got up and walked it off to make sure no bones were broken, and I cleaned off my scrapes. Afterward I wondered if I could’ve worked my knife out of my pocket and scraped enough dirt out from under my boot to wriggle loose. But among other lessons, no more falling trees by myself anymore.
 
super rube

super rube

ArboristSite Lurker
Joined
Jan 25, 2021
Messages
19
Location
south carolina
Although I'm not an expert on the subject, I just wanted to discuss a few things about it.
First of all, keep your cool and if you still got two legs and a heart beat, you'll probably be ok.
You can lose alot of blood and still live.
Finding the trail out can be the biggest problem, that's why snow is a good thing as you can sometimes follow your back trail.
When hurt you'll have mega adrenalin, so use that to your advantage and when and if you find help, be chipper and laugh a bit, that will help the first responder to act fast and not freak out.
Saw injuries are mostly just superficial, so keep your cool then too.
Most injuries are not life threatening and those that are will be read about in the news.
Once again, keep your cool and enjoy the adrenalin rush and the warm feeling of the blood.
John
Once I was a logger with my grandpa. Smartest logger I’ve ever known. I quit when he retired. He always said that was good we quit before someone got seriously hurt or killed. He would never let me run a chain saw by myself or anyone else for that matter. I heard some good advice bout the first aid kit and stuff. But a buddy or family member would be a big help if an accident happened. Remember when out in the woods cell phones don’t always work. But a buddy might get in range to call for help. Better safe than sorry. Wood or logs can sometimes wait til another day.
 
2dogs

2dogs

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Sep 2, 2007
Messages
8,007
Location
Santa Cruz CA
Has anyone gotten into any spring yellowjacket nest yet? The crew hit a small one yesterday and only one got hit. Unfortunately most of the little demons went up inside his pant leg. He didn't use a strap to keep the pants tight to the boots and he didn't lace his boots properly so they were loose at the top. They went down into his boots on both feet where they stung three or four times on each foot. I gave him a sting eraser which really helped but he suffered for awhile.
 
Ted Jenkins

Ted Jenkins

Firewood by TJ
Joined
Apr 18, 2016
Messages
3,275
Location
Twin Peaks
A few summmers ago I rose about 4 AM and went over to an area about 600 yds from my camp in my pickup. About 4:30 to 5 AM I was cutting making progress even though it was not very bright. During the night we had about 2 or 3" of snow. There were a couple blankets that I had wrapped around some ice chests to keep the sun off of them. I noticed that the blackets were soaking wet so I threw them over the side boards of my pickup and kept cutting. Around 8 AM I felt something crawling around on my hands and arms then I got stung. I knew that my hands would swell so time was important. I reeled around seeing that the blankets were covered with bees so ran away from the pickup a few hundred feet to figure what was next. I had some first aid stuff at my camp so that was helpful. Seeing that we had quite dry weather I should have known to not attract bees. I eventually got my sling shot and shot a line over the blankets to pull them to a place they would not bother me. I retrieved the blankets when it was dark which were dry by then. Quite a close call. Yes I had my radios but still a few terrifying moments. Thanks
 

Latest posts

Top