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Dynamic Kernmantle Rope?

Discussion in 'Arborist 101' started by Canyon Angler, Sep 8, 2007.

  1. Canyon Angler

    Canyon Angler ArboristSite Operative

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    I get the feeling that arbortists tend to not like stretchy kernmantle rope for climbing.

    Is that correct, and if yes, why?

    I mean, I understand the concept that "unlike rock climbers we plan NOT to fall," but if there's ANY chance of falling, why would you not prefer a rope with a little stretch to it?

    Sorry if this is a dumb question but thanks for any answers.

    Jeff
     
  2. rbtree

    rbtree Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Dynamic kernmantle has way more than a "little" stretch! It's about 6-7% at bodyweight. Since we are on and off our rope constantly, we want a line with 1-2.5% stretch like our semi static lines. And during normal work, we don't let more a couple feet of slack be in the system.

    (Free) Lead rock climbing is totally different. A climber is only on his line when on rappel or while falling.
     
  3. Grace Tree

    Grace Tree Impossible Access

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    I picked up some NE kernmantle cheap and planned on using it for long pitch access but after using it a few times I found the bounce disconcerting and stopped using it. I've used and abused it for a utility line for the past couple years and it shows almost no wear.
    Phil
     
  4. RedlineIt

    RedlineIt AboristSite Guru

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    There are safety reasons for not wanting stretchy rope, like positioning over electrical power lines, or a glass greenhouse, close work with other pointy hazards.

    But one key factor is that we arborists often do not gain access to to the tree by climbing the tree, we install our ropes in the tree and then climb our ropes.

    Ever try footlocking 60' of dynamic? Don't bother.

    Another thing would be limbwalking a brittle species out to the end of the branch. You need your rope tied in as high as you can, and only feed yourself just enough slack so the you can make traction with your feet. At the very end you may go hand over hand, feeding (or gathering) slack in the tiniest bits. The wavering of your Tie In Point (TIP) becomes a factor, a good gust of wind can change things in the wrong direction, put more of less of your weight where you want it (Don't crack that spindly limb!) The last thing you want at that point is anything but static rope.

    Finally, the way we climb, the chance of a fall is almost never vertical, it is against the chance of a swing. Thus we employ a lanyard or a second TIP in strategic positions to arrest this possibility.

    Does this answer your question?


    RedlineIt
     
  5. Canyon Angler

    Canyon Angler ArboristSite Operative

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    Wow, great reply RI! Moly mackerel! :bowdown: I just read it a 2nd time and yes it answers my question! :cheers:
     

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