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$40 Stihl saw repair, tune and cut.

Gaudaost

Gaudaost

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Tuesday last week I saw a non running Stihl 020 avp on market place for $40 Australian dollars.

Considering that I’d pay that for the old school badge alone, I went for it.

I got it home and had a proper look.

The bad:

1). Front handle was destroyed
2). The carb was full of aluminum oxide, water and varnished fuel.
3). Air leak from the intake manifold
4). No chain-break mechanism
5) Inlet needle seat corroded and leaking
6). High speed check ball leaking

The good:

1). Piston and cylinder are great
2). Excellent compression
3). Good strong spark, clean points and working condenser.

Fixes implemented:

1). New carb kit
2). I milled the needle seat
3). Installed a used but better than the current inlet needle.
4). Installed a used but better than the current fuel filter
5. Gapped points
6). Made a new handle bar from aluminium tubing
7). Cable tied the intake manifold around the flange to remove air leak.

All in it cost $14 Australian dollars to repair it.

I tuned and cut with it today and considering the condition of the carb, it runs well!

Here is a 2 minute video of me tuning then cutting with it for the first time

 
Mad Professor

Mad Professor

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Tom, how do you mill the needle seat?

For points, the Snap-On man used to carry "flex-stones". Best thing IMHO for dressing points.

A length of plastic flexible strip, infused with aluminum oxide. Could be had with various grits/thickness/size.

Worked at a motorcycle dealership back when cycles had points, sometimes 3-4 of them. I had to time each cylinder, with a dial gauge, in sparky hole, using a ohm meter on the points.

Dirtbike days. We always had a matchbook cover to gap points. Set timing using a cigarette rolling paper. When the paper would slip, points opened. Only works with good/clean/even points. That method always had timing +/- 1-2 degrees when checked with a light.

I have LOTS of old engines that still run points. Favorite is an old Ford 9N tractor. It's 6V + ground electric. Starts right up to plow snow, when temperatures are ~ 0 oF, that's minus a bit oC

Have fun with the little saw. @lone wolf here is 020/200 guru here
 
Gaudaost

Gaudaost

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Tom, how do you mill the needle seat?

For points, the Snap-On man used to carry "flex-stones". Best thing IMHO for dressing points.

A length of plastic flexible strip, infused with aluminum oxide. Could be had with various grits/thickness/size.

Worked at a motorcycle dealership back when cycles had points, sometimes 3-4 of them. I had to time each cylinder, with a dial gauge, in sparky hole, using a ohm meter on the points.

Dirtbike days. We always had a matchbook cover to gap points. Set timing using a cigarette rolling paper. When the paper would slip, points opened. Only works with good/clean/even points. That method always had timing +/- 1-2 degrees when checked with a light.

I have LOTS of old engines that still run points. Favorite is an old Ford 9N tractor. It's 6V + ground electric. Starts right up to plow snow, when temperatures are ~ 0 oF, that's minus a bit oC

Have fun with the little saw. @lone wolf here is 020/200 guru here
Fantastic stuff mate! I milled it on my drill press using a 4 mm HSS mill just twisting it by hand a couple times :)

thanks for the points cleaning info!!
 
Gaudaost

Gaudaost

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Nice score!!
I wouldn't have thought about milling a needle seat like that, pretty clever.
Great advice from the wise Yoda - @trains

In fact, I took a picture of him diagnosing and repairing a saw all via telepathy - he doesn’t even lift a spanner now days.

8D416F92-5A58-4122-85A6-887B118353A9.jpeg

Joking aside, yes it was his suggestion and it worked very well.
 
trains

trains

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Thanks Tom,
Been fun teaching and helping someone who is interested in learning, and is not afraid to ask any question, as I say, the only stupid question is the one you dont ask.

I am always learning, I cant know everything, but even with my experience, I have asked many questions here, eg, one on using jb weld, as I had not used it before, so wanted to get an idea of what I was working with to make a good repair, got some good helpful advice, and planned accordingly, and made an effective repair.

One of the great things about this forum, is the depth of experience you can learn from that others bring.

Ok since were messing about with yoda memes ;)

oldschoolairmix.jpg
 
Gaudaost

Gaudaost

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Tomorrow, did you use a conduit bender for the handle bar, or do you have access to a real pipe bender?
Hahah I wish I photographed it before putting it on the saw and covering it. It didn’t look great (understatement), but feels like OEM with the thick rubber taking out my imperfections hehe.
I used heat and a vice - a work of art it’s not, functional it very much is! (Why am I still talking like Yoda?!)

A0A6CF43-A525-4D27-B725-4D22A8C745B7.jpeg 3045E137-5E2C-4AD5-922A-B19AF56AB229.jpeg
 
Bfletch

Bfletch

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Hahah I wish I photographed it before putting it on the saw and covering it. It didn’t look great (understatement), but feels like OEM with the thick rubber taking out my imperfections hehe.
I used heat and a vice - a work of art it’s not, functional it very much is! (Why am I still talking like Yoda?!)

View attachment 869902
Looks better than the Wallabies on the pitch!
 
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