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Need a couple confirmations and recommendations

The Satch

The Satch

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Located in western Washington, Wife and I bought this house a little over a year ago, and I have 5 trees to ask about, the first 4 I am planning on removing, especially if my thoughts are confirmed here.

First up, not sure what these two are, but it looks to me like they didn't survive the winter as they barely leafed out at all:



This one is a cherry, the fruits are small, pits are large, and fruit is bitter, but the real downside is some previous owner planted it over the septic drain field, so in the interest of avoiding any further or possible damage, I believe it needs to be removed. The picture is terrible (its also the tree in back of the first picture, inside the chicken run), but it is about 10" diameter, and 20 feet tall at the moment:


I believe this one is an alaskan cedar, and I do like it quite a bit, but it is within 2 feet of my foundation. Unless you guys tell me otherwise, I'm planning on removing it:


And lastly, I have this gigantic holy tree, I'm not sure if I should be doing anything with it as far as pruning, it has been left to its own devices for some time. It's about 8 feet from the foundation, so I believe its fine from that standpoint, but I'm not really sure what to do with it:


I appreciate any opinions and advice offered, thanks for looking
 
The Satch

The Satch

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I think I must have formatted my post poorly to get no replies. The first two trees I have removed. My main questions are as follows:

1. Am I right in thinking the cherry tree in the 3rd picture could damage my septic drain field?

2. I would love to be able to keep the Alaskan Cedar, but is it too close to my foundation?
 

ATH

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It the Alaskan weeping cedar's branches aren't too close to the house, I don't think there is a problem. Trees don't damage foundations....they find cracks (usually from poor construction) and exploit those. If the foundation is cracked, it needs fixed tree or no tree...

I would think that you don't want the cherry roots in the leech field...
 
TNTreeHugger

TNTreeHugger

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Is your holly tree a single leader, or a clump/multi-trunk? hard to tell how big it is from that photo, but I have a gigantic American holly about 12' from the farmhouse. It's massive and I don't think ever should have been allowed to get this big, this close to the house. A couple of the main trunks are leaning towards the house, one almost over the peak. The squirrels love it; nest in it and use it to get to the roof of the house.
One year during a a bad ice storm, the top third of one of the trunks came crashing down and brushed the front of the house.

My opinion? Yours is too close to the house to let grow unchecked. I would either cut it down now, or trim around the bottom, up to about 4' and keep it trimmed to shape.
They are beautiful trees, imo.
Here's my monster... it's probably 100 years old, or close to it.

Btw, a MAJOR concern is all the leaves it drops in the spring - they pile up like crazy and even the animals refuse to walk in that part of the yard for the sharp-pointy leaves. Hard to rake, seem to never decompose, just make a mess. DSC01574.JPG DSC01576.JPG DSC01582.JPG DSC01586.JPG
 
The Satch

The Satch

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Joined
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Messages
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It the Alaskan weeping cedar's branches aren't too close to the house, I don't think there is a problem. Trees don't damage foundations....they find cracks (usually from poor construction) and exploit those. If the foundation is cracked, it needs fixed tree or no tree...

I would think that you don't want the cherry roots in the leech field...
Thats good news about the cedar, as we love that tree. The cherry tree is a bummer, I had been reading that they are shallow rooted, so I was hoping to keep it as it provides good shade and eagle protection for my chickens, but the septic field is more important than that.

Is your holly tree a single leader, or a clump/multi-trunk? hard to tell how big it is from that photo, but I have a gigantic American holly about 12' from the farmhouse. It's massive and I don't think ever should have been allowed to get this big, this close to the house. A couple of the main trunks are leaning towards the house, one almost over the peak. The squirrels love it; nest in it and use it to get to the roof of the house.
One year during a a bad ice storm, the top third of one of the trunks came crashing down and brushed the front of the house.

My opinion? Yours is too close to the house to let grow unchecked. I would either cut it down now, or trim around the bottom, up to about 4' and keep it trimmed to shape.
They are beautiful trees, imo.
Here's my monster... it's probably 100 years old, or close to it.

Btw, a MAJOR concern is all the leaves it drops in the spring - they pile up like crazy and even the animals refuse to walk in that part of the yard for the sharp-pointy leaves. Hard to rake, seem to never decompose, just make a mess.

That holly you have is HUGE! Mine isn't anywhere near that big. It comes up about a foot, then splits into two 6" diameter trunks. It's about 20 feet tall right now, and the drip line is maybe 8 foot diameter, nowhere near as large as yours. If I am understanding you correctly, you would continue to let it grow upwards, but ensure it is maintained in a pleasing shape and for access around the base?
 
TNTreeHugger

TNTreeHugger

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Thats good news about the cedar, as we love that tree. The cherry tree is a bummer, I had been reading that they are shallow rooted, so I was hoping to keep it as it provides good shade and eagle protection for my chickens, but the septic field is more important than that.




That holly you have is HUGE! Mine isn't anywhere near that big. It comes up about a foot, then splits into two 6" diameter trunks. It's about 20 feet tall right now, and the drip line is maybe 8 foot diameter, nowhere near as large as yours. If I am understanding you correctly, you would continue to let it grow upwards, but ensure it is maintained in a pleasing shape and for access around the base?
First, let me make it clear I am NOT a professional arborist, I'm just offering my opinion as a homeowner who has a giant American holly.
If you can shear it and keep it in control, I would think it would be okay for quite a while... but it will get bigger.
I always think about tree removal down the line, should it be necessary, and how complicated it would be (expensive) to have a tree removed.
After I posted earlier, I found a google image of large sheared hollies. They look nice, but do you want something that large that close to your house?
Hollies825WFront.jpg

I can't tell you what's best in your situation. I would suggest maybe have a professional arborist come out and look at it.
 
The Satch

The Satch

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I'm not sure at the moment if we want the tree or not, my wife is leaning away from keeping it, but nothing is certain right now. Removal would be simple, I would do it myself, its not something I can see spending extra money to get removed. I can just fell it into my back yard and use the tractor to remove the stump if we decide against keeping it.
 
TNTreeHugger

TNTreeHugger

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I'm not sure at the moment if we want the tree or not, my wife is leaning away from keeping it, but nothing is certain right now. Removal would be simple, I would do it myself, its not something I can see spending extra money to get removed. I can just fell it into my back yard and use the tractor to remove the stump if we decide against keeping it.
Well, if you can take it down yourself if you ever need/want to, and there's room to do it, I would just shape it up and leave it be as long as it's not posing a problem.
At least until it get's too close to the house.
 
Jason Douglas

Jason Douglas

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Oct 23, 2016
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Columbus
Is your holly tree a single leader, or a clump/multi-trunk? hard to tell how big it is from that photo, but I have a gigantic American holly about 12' from the farmhouse. It's massive and I don't think ever should have been allowed to get this big, this close to the house. A couple of the main trunks are leaning towards the house, one almost over the peak. The squirrels love it; nest in it and use it to get to the roof of the house.
One year during a a bad ice storm, the top third of one of the trunks came crashing down and brushed the front of the house.

My opinion? Yours is too close to the house to let grow unchecked. I would either cut it down now, or trim around the bottom, up to about 4' and keep it trimmed to shape.
They are beautiful trees, imo.
Here's my monster... it's probably 100 years old, or close to it.

Btw, a MAJOR concern is all the leaves it drops in the spring - they pile up like crazy and even the animals refuse to walk in that part of the yard for the sharp-pointy leaves. Hard to rake, seem to never decompose, just make a mess. View attachment 739190 View attachment 739191 View attachment 739192 View attachment 739193
That's a big effing holly...
 
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