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tree pruning

Alice Schear

Alice Schear

New Member
Joined
Apr 17, 2001
Messages
2
I had a Chinese pistachio tree planted in our front yard in Dallas about 2 1/2 yers ago. Last Spring it grew a proportionately long vertical branch. We cut it so that the tree would have more of a rounded shape and hopefully fill in a little more. I think it has filled in since then, but this year about five long vertical branches have grown up above the main "ball" of the tree. I'm wondering if I should cut those long branches off this year and continue to do that every year as long as it grows like that. Before we boought the tree, we read that it had a nice "regular habit." I never read that it needed to be pruned as it grew. But, now as I see the way it is growing, I'm afraid it won't have a nice shape unless I help it along. I just don't want to be unnecessarily be keeping it small.
I'd really appreciate anyone sharing their expertise in this area. Thank you.
 
Darin

Darin

The Big Kahuna
Staff member
Joined
Mar 29, 2001
Messages
4,782
Location
Littleton, Colorado, United States
Alice,
The main "ball" you are talking about. Are you talking about the root ball (suckers are coming up) or the framework of the tree (main branches). I wouldnt hold the tree back from growing personally, but as it grows you can continue to make it the shape you want. I would only try to do this in the dormat season. Cutting off major branches of the tree will put major stress on it.
Darin
 
Alice Schear

Alice Schear

New Member
Joined
Apr 17, 2001
Messages
2
Darin,
I thought about it later, and was afraid my choice of the word "ball" might be confusing. I mean the main branches of the tree, not the roots.
Are you saying that if I want to manage the shape of the tree that I should do some trimming in the late Fall?
Alice
 
Darin

Darin

The Big Kahuna
Staff member
Joined
Mar 29, 2001
Messages
4,782
Location
Littleton, Colorado, United States
Pruning can be important to commercial growers in order to shape the trees for mechanical harvesting, but less so for the home orchardist. The trees should be trained to a modified central leader with 4 or 5 main scaffold limbs branching about 4 ft. from the ground. After initial training, little pruning is needed except to remove interfering branches. Heavy pruning reduces yield. Winter is actually best for pruning.
Hope this helps
Darin
 
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