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American Elm??

Discussion in 'Firewood, Heating and Wood Burning Equipment' started by FerrisDiesel, Jan 19, 2009.

  1. FerrisDiesel

    FerrisDiesel ArboristSite Lurker

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    Is this considered a hardwood??? and if so would people buy it if I split it and sold it???
     
  2. CentaurG2

    CentaurG2 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Yup.. any tree that loses its leaves in the winter is technically considered a hardwood. Now I am just an old yankee, but if you are going to try and pay your mortgage with split elm, I wish you the best of luck!!
     
  3. tomtrees58

    tomtrees58 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    :monkey:
    :monkey: :jaw drop: are you kidding tom trees
     
  4. Crofter

    Crofter Addicted to ArboristSite

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    It is good wood but I dont know what regulations your way regarding Dutch Elm Disease. You earn your money splitting that stuff and if there is any dead wood it tends to be a bit smelly in the house if I remember. It is nearly all gone from around here with the blight except the very odd new tree that seems to be making a spotty comeback.
     
  5. Butch(OH)

    Butch(OH) Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Cant answer either of your questions with authority but white Elm is one of my favorite firewoods. I think it is considered hardwood and lots of it is sold around these parts. Has decent burning and coaling qualities but the best thing is it has no comprason for cutting quality. All of them around here die from Dutch Elm D before they are much over 16". We let them stand a year and when you cut them down the entire tree is put in the truck, no bark, no branches, no brush to mess with. Splitting is another matter, nobody who splits by hand has much good to say about Elm.
     
  6. Butch(OH)

    Butch(OH) Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Wow! that is rapid fire response from the ole board eh? I started my slow typing when there was no responces and three others are in before me, LOL
     
  7. Lloyd H

    Lloyd H ArboristSite Operative

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    elm

    Butch is right on this one, Cleanest firewood to work with if you let it stand dead till all the bark and little stufff falls off. Plus if you have an adversion to falling wait around a little longer and it falls over by itself, albeit in its own chosen direction.
     
  8. bore_pig

    bore_pig AboristSite Guru

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    It will stink a bit when brought in the house. Especially if it gets a little wet before being brought inside.
     
  9. Lloyd H

    Lloyd H ArboristSite Operative

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    stinky elm

    Around here its sometimes called pi ss Elm, maybe its the smell that resulted in the name.
     
  10. AOD

    AOD Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Gotta let Elm dry and get really seasoned, then it doesn't smell when it is burning. I have a big American elm log in my backyard, probably 20" across at the base. Also, try splitting it with a maul, you'll be in for a surprise!
     
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  11. bore_pig

    bore_pig AboristSite Guru

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    :agree2::fart:
     
  12. forestryworks

    forestryworks Addicted to ArboristSite

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    elm needs a good two years to become "seasoned"...

    try finding some old blowdown if you own property
     
  13. outdoorlivin247

    outdoorlivin247 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    To qoute my dad "burns good in my stove"...
     
  14. Rookie1

    Rookie1 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Youll bust a nut tryingto hand split. I borrow my BIL's hyd.splitter when one comes down in my yard. I love the way it burns and if I had my way thats all Id burn. But sorry I wont pay for any.:)
     
  15. farmermike

    farmermike ArboristSite Operative

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    American elm burns real nice. Not quite as good as red elm but close. Gotta get it before the branches start falling off, other wise I wont touch it. It gets punky real fast. Splits hard, but not different than red elm. Stringy and miserable. Haven't really noticed a bad smell, but haven't paid much attention to it either.
     
  16. Ole Farmerbuck

    Ole Farmerbuck Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I've been selling over 30 cords of elm per year for the last 3 years around this little town. Maybe 3500 people. No complaints yet.$85 per 1/3 cord....i do ok.
     
  17. outdoorlivin247

    outdoorlivin247 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Does not smell any worse than Red Oak...If you are selling to the open fire place guy, I can see them not wanting it, but in an air tight stove it is great wood...The reason IMO is does smoke quite a bit more than most wood...
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2009
  18. jcappe

    jcappe AboristSite Guru

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    It's a good firewood, I've been cussing it the last two days though as I just got done splitting a truck load of it.
     
  19. thejdman04

    thejdman04 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    It burns real well.
     
  20. forestryworks

    forestryworks Addicted to ArboristSite

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    :laugh:
     

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