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Jonsered 2150

Discussion in 'Chainsaw' started by Smith1000, Mar 13, 2008.

  1. Smith1000

    Smith1000 New Member

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    I have had this saw for a number of years and have experienced some problems with it now and then. It has had some work and the guy at the chainsaw store said he never would have sold me this particular saw(I bought it elsewhere). He said there are a couple of problem areas, one being the oiler and another, the clutch. I recently put a new bar on it and a sharp chain. Recently, it cuts well at first-only briefly, but then begins to smoke the chain and it will cut nothing. Does this sound like a bad oiler? or could there be another reason/issue. I have been using a cheap Craftsman, which has been reliable and, remarkably will cut a lot of wood without much trouble. I would kind of like to get this Jonsered going again. Thanks.
     
  2. HUSKYMAN

    HUSKYMAN Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Sounds like you are getting the chain in the dirt. The oiler is easy to check, just point the bar at some concrete or a piece of wood and hit the throttle, the oil should spray out. Also you should see oil on the drive tangs.

    If the hain is dull the oiler is not the problem, its the operator and/or is sharpening skills.

    There is nothing wrong with the 2150, its a good saw
     
  3. 2000ssm6

    2000ssm6 Stihl User

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    +1, sounds like the operator.

    If your dealer or "saw guy" can't check to see if the oiler is working then you need to find another repair shop. Is your bar getting clogged with crap and not letting the oiler oil? Check between your rails for gunk/buildup and clean as needed. Spend more time sharpening chains also, it's easy.:)
     
  4. PB

    PB Addicted to ArboristSite

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    What everyone said above. Check the bar and make sure there is no blockage in the oil holes.
     
  5. extraspecialman

    extraspecialman Banned

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    I agree with the others,but there are some other things to consider.Does the saw have a sprocket nose or hard nose bar?A hard nose bar needs the chain run fairly loose.Also if its a sprocket nose ,make sure the chain,bar, and sprocket pitch are all the same.As in .325 or 3/8.Id say if the pitch was wrong on any you would have done broke the chain or stripped the sprocket,but its worth checkin into.Run the saw wide open with no load for a few seconds with a lighter weight motor oil like 10w40 or so,if the chain is wet its oiling.That saw should have an adjustable oiler on it,try turnin it all the way up.If its not oiling ,try checkin the filter in the oil tank,and make sure the oil line aint kinked.Hope this helps.
     
  6. mountainlake

    mountainlake Addicted to ArboristSite

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    So he runs his Jonsered in the ground and not his craftman, any logic to that? Think not. I'd check out the oiler. Steve
     
  7. SawTroll

    SawTroll Information Collector

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    Yes, I agree!
     
  8. Smith1000

    Smith1000 New Member

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    Thanks for the replies. There are good suggestions and some things I will check. I think it may be the oiler. I will take a closer look at the bar and the oiler holes. I haven't had the nose in the dirt. Blockage of the oiler holes is possibility. The shop I use is very good, but I have not run the saw by yet for them to look over.

    I have a new bar on it and will compare it closely to the old bar. There may be a problem there.
     
  9. geofore

    geofore Addicted to ArboristSite

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    blockage/oiler

    The blockage is most of the time in the dirt in the rails that doesn't clear out on it's own. A tiny screwdriver or an old credit card will clear the rails but one thing none of the new guys seem to do is empty the oil tank and rinse it out with a little fuel. Yes, the tank itself will collect sawdust and should be rinsed out once or twice a year. Last, once in a great while, the oiler will give out but that takes some doing to replace. Cleaning your saw after you use it makes a lot of difference in how well it works and how long it will last.
    Compressed air works to blow out the dust but do it outside and wear glasses as it sends dust and dirt everywhere. While you have the bar and side covers off blow out the fins on the engine they cool better that way. while you have the cover off also blow out the chain break so the dust doesn't build up in the spring. Remember to unlock the break when you try to put the covers back on. The biggest mistake is the break is locked and you can't get the cover to come off or go back on. You would not believe the look on the homeowners faces when they being me a saw they can't put back together, they hear the "click" and it dawns on them:dizzy: the break was engaged.
     
  10. SawTroll

    SawTroll Information Collector

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    Attention Smith.....

    ........very good post!
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2008
  11. spike60

    spike60 ArboristSite.com Sponsor

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    An actual oil pump failure on this saw is extremely rare. We sell lots of them and their cousins the Husky 350. I'm pretty sure the same pump is also used in the 2153/346XP pro models as well, but I haven't checked. I know of no problems with the clutch other than the occasional broken or worn out clutch spring.

    What we have sometimes seen on these saws is an oil pump drive gear failure. This almost exclusively happens in the winter, the problem caused by using summer weight bar oil when it gets very cold. In some ways, the plastic drive gear acts like a shear pin in a snow blower and protects the oil pump.

    The proper way to check an oil problem is to start "upstream" and run the saw without the bar and chain and see if it's pumping oil. That will tell you which direction you need to go.

    What is your oil consumption vs gas consumption? If you go through a whole tank of fuel, but use very little oil then I'd bet it is the oil drive gear, assuming the tank is clean. One last question is: are you actually using bar oil, or waste oil? Sediment in waste oil can screw up an oil pump.

    And I agree with whoever it was that suggested your dealer doesn't really know what he's doing.:(
     
    CharlieG likes this.

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